H. Rept. 107-308 - 107th Congress (2001-2002)
November 30, 2001

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House Report 107-308 - MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND RELATED AGENCIES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2002, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES




[House Report 107-308]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



107th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    107-308

======================================================================



 
MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND RELATED 
  AGENCIES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2002, AND FOR OTHER 
  PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

   November 30 (legislative day, November 29), 2001.--Ordered to be 
                                printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Rogers of Kentucky, from the committee of conference, submitted the 
                               following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 2299]

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 
2299) ``making appropriations for the Department of 
Transportation and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2002, and for other purposes'', having met, after 
full and free conference, have agreed to recommend and do 
recommend to their respective Houses as follows:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate, and agree to the same with an 
amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment, insert:
That the following sums are appropriated, out of any money in 
the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Department of 
Transportation and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2002, and for other purposes, namely:

                                TITLE I

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                        OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

                         Salaries and Expenses

    For necessary expenses of the Office of the Secretary, 
$67,778,000, of which not to exceed $1,929,000 shall be 
available for the immediate Office of the Secretary; not to 
exceed $619,000 shall be available for the immediate Office of 
the Deputy Secretary; not to exceed $13,355,000 shall be 
available for the Office of the General Counsel; not to exceed 
$3,058,000 shall be for the Office of the Assistant Secretary 
for Policy; not to exceed $7,421,000 shall be available for the 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Aviation and 
International Affairs; not to exceed $7,728,000 shall be 
available for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Budget 
and Programs; not to exceed $2,282,000 shall be available for 
the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Government Affairs; 
not to exceed $19,250,000 shall be available for the Office of 
the Assistant Secretary for Administration; not to exceed 
$1,723,000 shall be available for the Office of Public Affairs; 
not to exceed $1,204,000 shall be available for the Office of 
the Executive Secretariat; not to exceed $507,000 shall be 
available for the Board of Contract Appeals; not to exceed 
$1,240,000 shall be available for the Office of Small and 
Disadvantaged Business Utilization; not to exceed $1,321,000 
shall be available for the Office of Intelligence and Security; 
not to exceed $6,141,000 shall be available for the Office of 
the Chief Information Officer: Provided, That not to exceed 
$60,000 shall be for allocation within the Department for 
official reception and representation expenses as the Secretary 
may determine: Provided further, That notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, excluding fees authorized in Public Law 107-
71, there may be credited to this appropriation up to 
$2,500,000 in funds received in user fees: Provided further, 
That the Secretary of Transportation is authorized to transfer 
funds appropriated for any office of the Office of the 
Secretary to any other office of the Office of the Secretary: 
Provided further, That no appropriation for any office shall be 
increased or decreased by more than 7 percent by all such 
transfers: Provided further, That any such transfer shall be 
submitted for approval to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations.

                         Office of Civil Rights

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Civil Rights, 
$8,500,000.

                 Transportation Security Administration

    For necessary expenses of the Transportation Security 
Administration related to providing civil aviation security 
services pursuant to Public Law 107-71, $1,250,000,000, to 
remain available until expended: Provided, That, security 
service fees authorized under 49 U.S.C. 44940 shall be credited 
to this appropriation as offsetting collections and used for 
providing civil aviation security services authorized by that 
section: Provided further, That the sum herein appropriated 
from the General Fund shall be reduced as such offsetting 
collections are received during fiscal year 2002 so as to 
result in a final fiscal year appropriation from the General 
Fund estimated at not more than $0.

           Transportation Planning, Research, and Development

    For necessary expenses for conducting transportation 
planning, research, systems development, development 
activities, and making grants, to remain available until 
expended, $11,993,000.

              Transportation Administrative Service Center

    Necessary expenses for operating costs and capital outlays 
of the Transportation Administrative Service Center, not to 
exceed $125,323,000, shall be paid from appropriations made 
available to the Department of Transportation: Provided, That 
such services shall be provided on a competitive basis to 
entities within the Department of Transportation: Provided 
further, That the above limitation on operating expenses shall 
not apply to non-DOT entities: Provided further, That no funds 
appropriated in this Act to an agency of the Department shall 
be transferred to the Transportation Administrative Service 
Center without the approval of the agency modal administrator: 
Provided further, That no assessments may be levied against any 
program, budget activity, subactivity or project funded by this 
Act unless notice of such assessments and the basis therefor 
are presented to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations and are approved by such Committees.

               Minority Business Resource Center Program

    For the cost of guaranteed loans, $500,000, as authorized 
by 49 U.S.C. 332: Provided, That such costs, including the cost 
of modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974: Provided further, That 
these funds are available to subsidize total loan principal, 
any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to exceed 
$18,367,000. In addition, for administrative expenses to carry 
out the guaranteed loan program, $400,000.

                       Minority Business Outreach

    For necessary expenses of Minority Business Resource Center 
outreach activities, $3,000,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2003: Provided, That notwithstanding 49 U.S.C. 
332, these funds may be used for business opportunities related 
to any mode of transportation.

                        Payments to Air Carriers


                    (airport and airway trust fund)


    In addition to funds made available from any other source 
to carry out the essential air service program under 49 U.S.C. 
41731 through 41742, to be derived from the Airport and Airway 
Trust Fund, $13,000,000, to remain available until expended.

                              COAST GUARD

                           Operating Expenses

    For necessary expenses for the operation and maintenance of 
the Coast Guard, not otherwise provided for; purchase of not to 
exceed five passenger motor vehicles for replacement only; 
payments pursuant to section 156 of Public Law 97-377, as 
amended (42 U.S.C. 402 note), and section 229(b) of the Social 
Security Act (42 U.S.C. 429(b)); and recreation and welfare, 
$3,382,000,000, of which $440,000,000 shall be available for 
defense-related activities; and of which $24,945,000 shall be 
derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund: Provided, That 
none of the funds appropriated in this or any other Act shall 
be available for pay of administrative expenses in connection 
with shipping commissioners in the United States: Provided 
further, That none of the funds provided in this Act shall be 
available for expenses incurred for yacht documentation under 
46 U.S.C. 12109, except to the extent fees are collected from 
yacht owners and credited to this appropriation: Provided 
further, That of the amounts made available under this heading, 
not less than $14,541,000 shall be used solely to increase 
staffing at Search and Rescue stations, surf stations and 
command centers, increase the training and experience level of 
individuals serving in said stations through targeted retention 
efforts, revise personnel policies and expand training 
programs, and to modernize and improve the quantity and quality 
of personal safety equipment, including survival suits, for 
personnel assigned to said stations: Provided further, That the 
Department of Transportation Inspector General shall audit and 
certify to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
that the funding described in the preceding proviso is being 
used solely to supplement and not supplant the Coast Guard's 
level of effort in this area in fiscal year 2001.

              Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements

    For necessary expenses of acquisition, construction, 
renovation, and improvement of aids to navigation, shore 
facilities, vessels, and aircraft, including equipment related 
thereto, $636,354,000, of which $20,000,000 shall be derived 
from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund; of which $89,640,000 
shall be available to acquire, repair, renovate or improve 
vessels, small boats and related equipment, to remain available 
until September 30, 2006; $9,500,000 shall be available to 
acquire new aircraft and increase aviation capability, to 
remain available until September 30, 2004; $79,293,000 shall be 
available for other equipment, to remain available until 
September 30, 2004; $73,100,000 shall be available for shore 
facilities and aids to navigation facilities, to remain 
available until September 30, 2004; $64,631,000 shall be 
available for personnel compensation and benefits and related 
costs, to remain available until September 30, 2003; and 
$320,190,000 shall be available for the Integrated Deepwater 
Systems program, to remain available until September 30, 2006: 
Provided, That the Commandant of the Coast Guard is authorized 
to dispose of surplus real property, by sale or lease, and the 
proceeds shall be credited to this appropriation as offsetting 
collections and made available only for the National Distress 
and Response System Modernization program, to remain available 
for obligation until September 30, 2004: Provided further, That 
none of the funds provided under this heading may be obligated 
or expended for the Integrated Deepwater Systems (IDS) system 
integration contract until the Secretary or Deputy Secretary of 
Transportation and the Director, Office of Management and 
Budget jointly certify to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations that funding for the IDS program for fiscal 
years 2003 through 2007, funding for the National Distress and 
Response System Modernization program to allow for full 
deployment of said system by 2006, and funding for other 
essential search and rescue procurements, are fully funded in 
the Coast Guard Capital Investment Plan and within the Office 
of Management and Budget's budgetary projections for the Coast 
Guard for those years: Provided further, That none of the funds 
provided under this heading may be obligated or expended for 
the Integrated Deepwater Systems (IDS) integration contract 
until the Secretary or Deputy Secretary of Transportation and 
the Director, Office of Management and Budget jointly approve a 
contingency procurement strategy for the recapitalization of 
assets and capabilities envisioned in the IDS: Provided 
further, That upon initial submission to the Congress of the 
fiscal year 2003 President's budget, the Secretary of 
Transportation shall transmit to the Congress a comprehensive 
capital investment plan for the United States Coast Guard which 
includes funding for each budget line item for fiscal years 
2003 through 2007, with total funding for each year of the plan 
constrained to the funding targets for those years as estimated 
and approved by the Office of Management and Budget: Provided 
further, That the amount herein appropriated shall be reduced 
by $100,000 per day for each day after initial submission of 
the President's budget that the plan has not been submitted to 
the Congress: Provided further, That the Director, Office of 
Management and Budget shall submit the budget request for the 
IDS integration contract delineating sub-headings which include 
the following: systems integrator, ship construction, aircraft, 
equipment, and communications, providing specific assets and 
costs under each sub-heading.

                Environmental Compliance and Restoration

    For necessary expenses to carry out the Coast Guard's 
environmental compliance and restoration functions under 
chapter 19 of title 14, United States Code, $16,927,000, to 
remain available until expended.

                         Alteration of Bridges

    For necessary expenses for alteration or removal of 
obstructive bridges, $15,466,000, to remain available until 
expended.

                              Retired Pay

    For retired pay, including the payment of obligations 
therefor otherwise chargeable to lapsed appropriations for this 
purpose, payments under the Retired Serviceman's Family 
Protection and Survivor Benefits Plans, payment for career 
status bonuses under the National Defense Authorization Act, 
and for payments for medical care of retired personnel and 
their dependents under the Dependents Medical Care Act (10 
U.S.C. ch. 55), $876,346,000.

                            Reserve Training


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For all necessary expenses of the Coast Guard Reserve, as 
authorized by law; maintenance and operation of facilities; and 
supplies, equipment, and services, $83,194,000: Provided, That 
no more than $25,800,000 of funds made available under this 
heading may be transferred to Coast Guard ``Operating 
expenses'' or otherwise made available to reimburse the Coast 
Guard for financial support of the Coast Guard Reserve: 
Provided further, That none of the funds in this Act may be 
used by the Coast Guard to assess direct charges on the Coast 
Guard Reserves for items or activities which were not so 
charged during fiscal year 1997.

              Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation

    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for 
applied scientific research, development, test, and evaluation; 
maintenance, rehabilitation, lease and operation of facilities 
and equipment, as authorized by law, $20,222,000, to remain 
available until expended, of which $3,492,000 shall be derived 
from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund: Provided, That there 
may be credited to and used for the purposes of this 
appropriation funds received from State and local governments, 
other public authorities, private sources, and foreign 
countries, for expenses incurred for research, development, 
testing, and evaluation.

                    FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION

                               Operations

    For necessary expenses of the Federal Aviation 
Administration, not otherwise provided for, including 
operations and research activities related to commercial space 
transportation, administrative expenses for research and 
development, establishment of air navigation facilities, the 
operation (including leasing) and maintenance of aircraft, 
subsidizing the cost of aeronautical charts and maps sold to 
the public, lease or purchase of passenger motor vehicles for 
replacement only, in addition to amounts made available by 
Public Law 104-264, $6,886,000,000, of which $5,773,519,000 
shall be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust Fund, of 
which not to exceed $5,452,871,000 shall be available for air 
traffic services program activities; not to exceed $768,769,000 
shall be available for aviation regulation and certification 
program activities; not to exceed $150,154,000 shall be 
available for civil aviation security program activities; not 
to exceed $195,799,000 shall be available for research and 
acquisition program activities; not to exceed $12,456,000 shall 
be available for commercial space transportation program 
activities; not to exceed $50,284,000 shall be available for 
financial services program activities; not to exceed 
$69,516,000 shall be available for human resources program 
activities; not to exceed $85,943,000 shall be available for 
regional coordination program activities; and not to exceed 
$109,208,000 shall be available for staff offices: Provided, 
That none of the funds in this Act shall be available for the 
Federal Aviation Administration to finalize or implement any 
regulation that would promulgate new aviation user fees not 
specifically authorized by law after the date of the enactment 
of this Act: Provided further, That there may be credited to 
this appropriation funds received from States, counties, 
municipalities, foreign authorities, other public authorities, 
and private sources, for expenses incurred in the provision of 
agency services, including receipts for the maintenance and 
operation of air navigation facilities, and for issuance, 
renewal or modification of certificates, including airman, 
aircraft, and repair station certificates, or for tests related 
thereto, or for processing major repair or alteration forms: 
Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this 
heading, not less than $6,000,000 shall be for the contract 
tower cost-sharing program: Provided further, That funds may be 
used to enter into a grant agreement with a nonprofit standard-
setting organization to assist in the development of aviation 
safety standards: Provided further, That none of the funds in 
this Act shall be available for new applicants for the second 
career training program: Provided further, That none of the 
funds in this Act shall be available for paying premium pay 
under 5 U.S.C. 5546(a) to any Federal Aviation Administration 
employee unless such employee actually performed work during 
the time corresponding to such premium pay: Provided further, 
That none of the funds in this Act may be obligated or expended 
to operate a manned auxiliary flight service station in the 
contiguous United States: Provided further, That none of the 
funds in this Act for aeronautical charting and cartography are 
available for activities conducted by, or coordinated through, 
the Transportation Administrative Service Center.

                        Facilities and Equipment


                    (airport and airway trust fund)


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for 
acquisition, establishment, and improvement by contract or 
purchase, and hire of air navigation and experimental 
facilities and equipment as authorized under part A of subtitle 
VII of title 49, United States Code, including initial 
acquisition of necessary sites by lease or grant; engineering 
and service testing, including construction of test facilities 
and acquisition of necessary sites by lease or grant; 
construction and furnishing of quarters and related 
accommodations for officers and employees of the Federal 
Aviation Administration stationed at remote localities where 
such accommodations are not available; and the purchase, lease, 
or transfer of aircraft from funds available under this 
heading; to be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust Fund, 
$2,914,000,000, of which $2,536,900,000 shall remain available 
until September 30, 2004, and of which $377,100,000 shall 
remain available until September 30, 2002: Provided, That there 
may be credited to this appropriation funds received from 
States, counties, municipalities, other public authorities, and 
private sources, for expenses incurred in the establishment and 
modernization of air navigation facilities: Provided further, 
That upon initial submission to the Congress of the fiscal year 
2003 President's budget, the Secretary of Transportation shall 
transmit to the Congress a comprehensive capital investment 
plan for the Federal Aviation Administration which includes 
funding for each budget line item for fiscal years 2003 through 
2007, with total funding for each year of the plan constrained 
to the funding targets for those years as estimated and 
approved by the Office of Management and Budget: Provided 
further, That the amount herein appropriated shall be reduced 
by $100,000 per day for each day after initial submission of 
the President's budget that the plan has not been submitted to 
the Congress.

                        Facilities and Equipment


                    (airport and airway trust fund)


                              (rescission)


    Of the available balances under this heading, $15,000,000 
are rescinded.

                 Research, Engineering, and Development


                    (airport and airway trust fund)


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for 
research, engineering, and development, as authorized under 
part A of subtitle VII of title 49, United States Code, 
including construction of experimental facilities and 
acquisition of necessary sites by lease or grant, $195,000,000, 
to be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust Fund and to 
remain available until September 30, 2004: Provided, That there 
may be credited to this appropriation funds received from 
States, counties, municipalities, other public authorities, and 
private sources, for expenses incurred for research, 
engineering, and development.

                       Grants-in-Aid for Airports


                (liquidation of contract authorization)


                      (limitation on obligations)


                    (airport and airway trust fund)


    For liquidation of obligations incurred for grants-in-aid 
for airport planning and development, and noise compatibility 
planning and programs as authorized under subchapter I of 
chapter 471 and subchapter I of chapter 475 of title 49, United 
States Code, and under other law authorizing such obligations; 
for procurement, installation, and commissioning of runway 
incursion prevention devices and systems at airports of such 
title; for implementation of section 203 of Public Law 106-181; 
and for inspection activities and administration of airport 
safety programs, including those related to airport operating 
certificates under section 44706 of title 49, United States 
Code, $1,800,000,000, to be derived from the Airport and Airway 
Trust Fund and to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That none of the funds under this heading shall be available 
for the planning or execution of programs the obligations for 
which are in excess of $3,300,000,000 in fiscal year 2002, 
notwithstanding section 47117(h) of title 49, United States 
Code: Provided further, That notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, not more than $57,050,000 of funds limited 
under this heading shall be obligated for administration and 
not less than $20,000,000 shall be for the Small Community Air 
Service Development Pilot Program.

                       Grants-in-Aid for Airports


                    (airport and airway trust fund)


                 (rescission of contract authorization)


    Of the unobligated balances authorized under 49 U.S.C. 
48103, as amended, $301,720,000 are rescinded.

                   Aviation Insurance Revolving Fund

    The Secretary of Transportation is hereby authorized to 
make such expenditures and investments, within the limits of 
funds available pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 44307, and in accordance 
with section 104 of the Government Corporation Control Act, as 
amended (31 U.S.C. 9104), as may be necessary in carrying out 
the program for aviation insurance activities under chapter 443 
of title 49, United States Code.

                     FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION

                 Limitation on Administrative Expenses

    Necessary expenses for administration and operation of the 
Federal Highway Administration, not to exceed $311,000,000, 
shall be paid in accordance with law from appropriations made 
available by this Act to the Federal Highway Administration 
together with advances and reimbursements received by the 
Federal Highway Administration: Provided, That of the funds 
available under section 104(a)(1)(A) of title 23, United States 
Code: $7,500,000 shall be available for ``Child Passenger 
Protection Education Grants'' under section 2003(b) of Public 
Law 105-178, as amended; $4,000,000 shall be available for 
motor carrier safety research; $841,000 shall be available for 
the motor carrier crash data improvement program; $6,000,000 
shall be available for the nationwide differential global 
positioning system program; and $1,500,000 for environmental 
streamlining activities.

                          Federal-Aid Highways


                      (limitation on obligations)


                          (highway trust fund)


    None of the funds in this Act shall be available for the 
implementation or execution of programs, the obligations for 
which are in excess of $31,799,104,000 for Federal-aid highways 
and highway safety construction programs for fiscal year 2002: 
Provided, That within the $31,799,104,000 obligation limitation 
on Federal-aid highways and highway safety construction 
programs, not more than $447,500,000 shall be available for the 
implementation or execution of programs for transportation 
research (sections 502, 503, 504, 506, 507, and 508 of title 
23, United States Code, as amended; section 5505 of title 49, 
United States Code, as amended; and sections 5112 and 5204-5209 
of Public Law 105-178) for fiscal year 2002: Provided further, 
That this limitation on transportation research programs shall 
not apply to any funds authorized under section 110 of title 
23, United States Code, and allocated to these programs, or to 
any authority previously made available for obligation: 
Provided further, That within the $225,000,000 obligation 
limitation on Intelligent Transportation Systems, the following 
sums shall be made available for Intelligent Transportation 
System projects that are designed to achieve the goals and 
purposes set forth in section 5203 of the Intelligent 
Transportation Systems Act of 1998 (subtitle C of title V of 
Public Law 105-178; 112 Stat. 453; 23 U.S.C. 502 note) in the 
following specified areas:
            Alameda-Contra Costa, California, $500,000;
            Alaska statewide; $2,500,000;
            Alexandria, Virginia, $750,000;
            Arizona statewide EMS, $500,000;
            Army trail road traffic signal coordination 
        project, Illinois, $300,000;
            Atlanta smart corridors, Georgia, $1,000,000;
            Austin, Texas, $125,000;
            Automated crash notification, UAB, Alabama, 
        $2,500,000;
            Bay County Area wide traffic signal system, 
        Florida, $500,000;
            Beaver County transit mobility manager, 
        Pennsylvania, $800,000;
            Brownsville, Texas, $250,000;
            Carbondale technology transfer center, 
        Pennsylvania, $1,000,000;
            Cargo mate logistics and intermodal management, New 
        York, $1,250,000;
            Central Ohio, $1,500,000;
            Chattanooga, Tennessee, $2,000,000;
            Chinatown intermodal transportation center, 
        California, $1,750,000;
            Clark County, Washington, $1,000,000;
            Commercial vehicle information systems and 
        networks, New York, $450,000;
            Dayton, Ohio, $1,250,000;
            Detroit, Michigan (airport), $1,500,000;
            Durham, Wake Counties, North Carolina, $500,000;
            Eastern Kentucky rural highway information, 
        $2,000,000;
            Fargo, North Dakota, $1,000,000;
            Forsyth, Guilford Counties, North Carolina, 
        $1,000,000;
            Genesee County, Michigan, $1,000,000;
            Great Lakes, Michigan, $1,500,000;
            Guidestar, Minnesota, $6,000,000;
            Harrison County, Mississippi, $500,000;
            Hawaii statewide, $1,000,000;
            Hoosier SAFE-T, Indiana, $2,000,000;
            Houma, Louisiana, $1,000,000;
            I-90 connector testbed, New York, $1,000,000;
            Illinois statewide, $2,000,000;
            Inglewood, California, $500,000;
            Integrated transportation management system, 
        Delaware statewide, $2,000,000;
            Iowa statewide, $562,000;
            Jackson Metropolitan, Mississippi, $500,000;
            James Madison University, Virginia, $1,500,000;
            Kansas City, Kansas, $500,000;
            Kittitas County workzone traffic safety system, 
        Washington, $450,000;
            Lansing, Michigan, $750,000;
            Las Vegas, Nevada, $1,450,000;
            Lexington, Kentucky, $750,000;
            Libertyville traffic management center, Illinois, 
        $760,000;
            Long Island rail road grade crossing deployment, 
        New York, $1,000,000;
            Macomb, Michigan (border crossing), $1,000,000;
            Maine statewide (rural), $500,000;
            Maryland statewide, $1,000,000;
            Miami-Dade, Florida, $1,000,000;
            Monterey-Salinas, California, $750,000;
            Montgomery County ECC & TMC, Maryland, $1,000,000;
            Moscow, Idaho, $1,000,000;
            Nebraska statewide, $4,000,000;
            New York statewide information exchange systems, 
        New York, $500,000;
            New York, New Jersey, Connecticut (TRANSCOM), 
        $2,500,000;
            North Greenbush, New York, $1,000,000;
            Oklahoma statewide, $3,000,000;
            Oxford, Mississippi, $500,000;
            Pennsylvania statewide (turnpike), $500,000;
            Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, $1,033,000;
            Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Drexel), $1,500,000;
            Pioneer Valley, Massachusetts, $1,500,000;
            Port of Long Beach, California, $500,000;
            Port of Tacoma trucker congestion notification 
        system, Washington, $200,000;
            Roadside animal detection test-bed, Montana, 
        $500,000;
            Rochester-Genesse, New York, $800,000;
            Rutland, Vermont, $750,000;
            Sacramento, California, $3,000,000;
            San Diego joint transportation operations center, 
        California, $1,500,000;
            San Francisco central control communications, 
        California, $250,000;
            Santa Anita, California, $300,000;
            Santa Teresa, New Mexico, $750,000;
            Shreveport, Louisiana, $750,000;
            Silicon Valley transportation management center, 
        California, $700,000;
            South Carolina DOT, $3,000,000;
            Southeast Corridor, Colorado, $7,000,000;
            Southern Nevada (bus), $1,100,000;
            Spillway road incident management system, 
        Mississippi, $600,000;
            St. Louis, Missouri, $1,000,000;
            Statewide transportation operations center, 
        Kentucky, $2,000,000;
            Superior, I-39 corridor, Wisconsin, $2,500,000;
            Texas statewide, $2,000,000;
            Travel network, South Dakota, $2,325,000;
            University of Arizona ATLAS Center, Arizona, 
        $500,000;
            Utah Statewide, $560,000;
            Vermont statewide (rural), $1,500,000;
            Washington statewide, $4,500,000;
            Washington, D.C. metropolitan region, $2,000,000;
            Wayne County road information management system, 
        Michigan, $1,500,000;
            Wichita, Kansas, $1,200,000;
            Wisconsin communications network, $310,000;
            Wisconsin statewide, $1,000,000;
            Yakima County adverse weather operations, 
        Washington, $475,000:
Provided further, That, notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, funds authorized under section 110 of title 23, United 
States Code, for fiscal year 2002 shall be apportioned to the 
States in accordance with the distribution set forth in section 
110(b)(4)(A) and (B) of title 23, United States Code, except 
that before such apportionments are made, $35,565,651 shall be 
set aside for the program authorized under section 
1101(a)(8)(A) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st 
Century, as amended, and section 204 of title 23, United States 
Code; $31,815,091 shall be set aside for the program authorized 
under section 1101(a)(8)(B) of the Transportation Equity Act 
for the 21st Century, as amended, and section 204 of title 23, 
United States Code; $21,339,391 shall be set aside for the 
program authorized under section 1101(a)(8)(C) of the 
Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, as amended, and 
section 204 of title 23, United States Code; $2,586,593 shall 
be set aside for the program authorized under section 
1101(a)(8)(D) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st 
Century, as amended, and section 204 of title 23, United States 
Code; $25,579,000 shall be set aside for the program authorized 
under section 129(c) of title 23, United States Code, and 
section 1064 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation 
Efficiency Act of 1991, as amended; $352,256,000 shall be set 
aside for the programs authorized under sections 1118 and 1119 
of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, as 
amended; $3,348,128 shall be set aside for the program 
authorized under section 1101(a)(11) of the Transportation 
Equity Act for the 21st Century, as amended and section 162 of 
title 23, United States Code; $76,025,000 shall be set aside 
for the program authorized under section 118(c) of title 23, 
United States Code; $62,450,000 shall be set aside for the 
program authorized under section 144(g) of title 23, United 
States Code; $251,092,600 shall be set aside for the program 
authorized under section 1221 of the Transportation Equity Act 
for the 21st Century, as amended; $10,000,000 shall be set 
aside for the program authorized under section 502(e) of title 
23, United States Code; $56,300,000 shall be available for 
border infrastructure improvements; $45,122,600 shall be 
available for allocation by the Secretary for public lands 
highways; and $23,896,000 shall be set aside and transferred to 
the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration as authorized 
by section 102 of Public Law 106-159: Provided further, That, 
of the funds to be apportioned to each State under section 110 
for fiscal year 2002, the Secretary shall ensure that such 
funds are apportioned for the programs authorized under 
sections 1101(a)(1), 1101(a)(2), 1101(a)(3), 1101(a)(4), and 
1101(a)(5) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st 
Century, as amended, in the same ratio that each State is 
apportioned funds for such programs in fiscal year 2002 but for 
this section.

                          Federal-Aid Highways


                (liquidation of contract authorization)


                          (highway trust fund)


    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for carrying 
out the provisions of title 23, United States Code, that are 
attributable to Federal-aid highways, including the National 
Scenic and Recreational Highway as authorized by 23 U.S.C. 148, 
not otherwise provided, including reimbursement for sums 
expended pursuant to the provisions of 23 U.S.C. 308, 
$30,000,000,000 or so much thereof as may be available in and 
derived from the Highway Trust Fund, to remain available until 
expended.

                 Appalachian Development Highway System

    For necessary expenses for the Appalachian Development 
Highway System as authorized under Section 1069(y) of Public 
Law 102-240, as amended, $200,000,000, to remain available 
until expended.

                       State Infrastructure Banks


                              (rescission)


    Of the funds made available for State Infrastructure Banks 
in Public Law 104-205, $5,750,000 are rescinded.

              FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION


                          motor carrier safety


                 limitation on administrative expenses


                    (including rescission of funds)


    For necessary expenses for administration of motor carrier 
safety programs and motor carrier safety research, pursuant to 
section 104(a)(1)(B) of title 23, United States Code, not to 
exceed $110,000,000 shall be paid in accordance with law from 
appropriations made available by this Act and from any 
available take-down balances to the Federal Motor Carrier 
Safety Administration, together with advances and 
reimbursements received by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration: Provided, That such amounts shall be available 
to carry out the functions and operations of the Federal Motor 
Carrier Safety Administration.
    Of the unobligated balances authorized under 23 U.S.C. 
104(a)(1)(B), $6,665,342 are rescinded.

                 National Motor Carrier Safety Program


                (liquidation of contract authorization)


                      (limitation on obligations)


                          (highway trust fund)


    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for payment of 
obligations incurred in carrying out 49 U.S.C. 31102, 31106 and 
31309, $205,896,000, to be derived from the Highway Trust Fund 
and to remain available until expended: Provided, That none of 
the funds in this Act shall be available for the implementation 
or execution of programs the obligations for which are in 
excess of $182,000,000 for ``Motor Carrier Safety Grants'', and 
``Information Systems'': Provided further, That notwithstanding 
any other provision of law, of the $23,896,000 provided under 
23 U.S.C. 110, $18,000,000 shall be for border State grants and 
$4,837,000 shall be for State commercial driver's license 
program improvements.

             NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

                        Operations and Research

    For expenses necessary to discharge the functions of the 
Secretary, with respect to traffic and highway safety under 
chapter 301 of title 49, United States Code, and part C of 
subtitle VI of title 49, United States Code, $127,780,000, of 
which $95,835,000 shall remain available until September 30, 
2004: Provided, That none of the funds appropriated by this Act 
may be obligated or expended to plan, finalize, or implement 
any rulemaking to add to section 575.104 of title 49 of the 
Code of Federal Regulations any requirement pertaining to a 
grading standard that is different from the three grading 
standards (treadwear, traction, and temperature resistance) 
already in effect.

                        Operations and Research


                (liquidation of contract authorization)


                      (limitation on obligations)


                          (highway trust fund)


            (including rescission of contract authorization)


    For payment of obligations incurred in carrying out the 
provisions of 23 U.S.C. 403, to remain available until 
expended, $72,000,000, to be derived from the Highway Trust 
Fund: Provided, That none of the funds in this Act shall be 
available for the planning or execution of programs the total 
obligations for which, in fiscal year 2002, are in excess of 
$72,000,000 for programs authorized under 23 U.S.C. 403.
    Of the unobligated balances authorized under 23 U.S.C. 403, 
$1,516,000 are rescinded.

                        National Driver Register


                          (highway trust fund)


    For expenses necessary to discharge the functions of the 
Secretary with respect to the National Driver Register under 
chapter 303 of title 49, United States Code, $2,000,000, to be 
derived from the Highway Trust Fund, and to remain available 
until expended.

                     Highway Traffic Safety Grants


                (liquidation of contract authorization)


                      (limitation on obligations)


                          (highway trust fund)


    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for payment of 
obligations incurred in carrying out the provisions of 23 
U.S.C. 402, 405, 410, and 411 to remain available until 
expended, $223,000,000, to be derived from the Highway Trust 
Fund: Provided, That none of the funds in this Act shall be 
available for the planning or execution of programs the total 
obligations for which, in fiscal year 2002, are in excess of 
$223,000,000 for programs authorized under 23 U.S.C. 402, 405, 
410, and 411 of which $160,000,000 shall be for ``Highway 
Safety Programs'' under 23 U.S.C. 402, $15,000,000 shall be for 
``Occupant Protection Incentive Grants'' under 23 U.S.C. 405, 
$38,000,000 shall be for ``Alcohol-Impaired Driving 
Countermeasures Grants'' under 23 U.S.C. 410, and $10,000,000 
shall be for the ``State Highway Safety Data Grants'' under 23 
U.S.C. 411: Provided further, That none of these funds shall be 
used for construction, rehabilitation, or remodeling costs, or 
for office furnishings and fixtures for State, local, or 
private buildings or structures: Provided further, That not to 
exceed $8,000,000 of the funds made available for section 402, 
not to exceed $750,000 of the funds made available for section 
405, not to exceed $1,900,000 of the funds made available for 
section 410, and not to exceed $500,000 of the funds made 
available for section 411 shall be available to NHTSA for 
administering highway safety grants under chapter 4 of title 
23, United States Code: Provided further, That not to exceed 
$500,000 of the funds made available for section 410 ``Alcohol-
Impaired Driving Countermeasures Grants'' shall be available 
for technical assistance to the States.

                    FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION

                         Safety and Operations

    For necessary expenses of the Federal Railroad 
Administration, not otherwise provided for, $110,857,000, of 
which $6,509,000 shall remain available until expended.

                   Railroad Research and Development

    For necessary expenses for railroad research and 
development, $29,000,000, to remain available until expended.

            Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Program

    The Secretary of Transportation is authorized to issue to 
the Secretary of the Treasury notes or other obligations 
pursuant to section 512 of the Railroad Revitalization and 
Regulatory Reform Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-210), as amended, 
in such amounts and at such times as may be necessary to pay 
any amounts required pursuant to the guarantee of the principal 
amount of obligations under sections 511 through 513 of such 
Act, such authority to exist as long as any such guaranteed 
obligation is outstanding: Provided, That pursuant to section 
502 of such Act, as amended, no new direct loans or loan 
guarantee commitments shall be made using Federal funds for the 
credit risk premium during fiscal year 2002.

                    Next Generation High-Speed Rail

    For necessary expenses for the Next Generation High-Speed 
Rail program as authorized under 49 U.S.C. 26101 and 26102, 
$32,300,000, to remain available until expended.

                     Alaska Railroad Rehabilitation

    To enable the Secretary of Transportation to make grants to 
the Alaska Railroad, $20,000,000 shall be for capital 
rehabilitation and improvements benefiting its passenger 
operations, to remain available until expended.

     Capital Grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation

    For necessary expenses of capital improvements of the 
National Railroad Passenger Corporation as authorized by 49 
U.S.C. 24104(a), $521,476,000, to remain available until 
expended.

                     FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION

                        Administrative Expenses

    For necessary administrative expenses of the Federal 
Transit Administration's programs authorized by chapter 53 of 
title 49, United States Code, $13,400,000: Provided, That no 
more than $67,000,000 of budget authority shall be available 
for these purposes: Provided further, That of the funds in this 
Act available for the execution of contracts under section 
5327(c) of title 49, United States Code, $2,000,000 shall be 
reimbursed to the Department of Transportation's Office of 
Inspector General for costs associated with audits and 
investigations of transit-related issues, including reviews of 
new fixed guideway systems: Provided further, That not to 
exceed $2,600,000 for the National transit database shall 
remain available until expended.

                             Formula Grants


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5307, 5308, 
5310, 5311, 5327, and section 3038 of Public Law 105-178, 
$718,400,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That no more than $3,592,000,000 of budget authority shall be 
available for these purposes: Provided further, That, 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, of the funds 
provided under this heading, $5,000,000 shall be available for 
grants for the costs of planning, delivery, and temporary use 
of transit vehicles for special transportation needs and 
construction of temporary transportation facilities for the 
VIII Paralympiad for the Disabled, to be held in Salt Lake 
City, Utah: Provided further, That in allocating the funds 
designated in the preceding proviso, the Secretary shall make 
grants only to the Utah Department of Transportation, and such 
grants shall not be subject to any local share requirement or 
limitation on operating assistance under this Act or the 
Federal Transit Act, as amended: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding section 3008 of Public Law 105-178 and 49 
U.S.C. 5309(m)(3)(C), $50,000,000 of the funds to carry out 49 
U.S.C. 5308 shall be transferred to and merged with funding 
provided for the replacement, rehabilitation, and purchase of 
buses and related equipment and the construction of bus-related 
facilities under ``Federal Transit Administration, Capital 
investment grants''.

                   University Transportation Research

    For necessary expenses to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5505, 
$1,200,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
no more than $6,000,000 of budget authority shall be available 
for these purposes.

                     Transit Planning and Research

    For necessary expenses to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5303, 5304, 
5305, 5311(b)(2), 5312, 5313(a), 5314, 5315, and 5322, 
$23,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
no more than $116,000,000 of budget authority shall be 
available for these purposes: Provided further, That $5,250,000 
is available to provide rural transportation assistance (49 
U.S.C. 5311(b)(2)), $4,000,000 is available to carry out 
programs under the National Transit Institute (49 U.S.C. 5315), 
$8,250,000 is available to carry out transit cooperative 
research programs (49 U.S.C. 5313(a)), $55,422,400 is available 
for metropolitan planning (49 U.S.C. 5303, 5304, and 5305), 
$11,577,600 is available for State planning (49 U.S.C. 
5313(b)); and $31,500,000 is available for the national 
planning and research program (49 U.S.C. 5314).

                      Trust Fund Share of Expenses


                (liquidation of contract authorization)


                          (highway trust fund)


    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for payment of 
obligations incurred in carrying out 49 U.S.C. 5303-5308, 5310-
5315, 5317(b), 5322, 5327, 5334, 5505, and sections 3037 and 
3038 of Public Law 105-178, $5,397,800,000, to remain available 
until expended, and to be derived from the Mass Transit Account 
of the Highway Trust Fund: Provided, That $2,873,600,000 shall 
be paid to the Federal Transit Administration's formula grants 
account: Provided further, That $93,000,000 shall be paid to 
the Federal Transit Administration's transit planning and 
research account: Provided further, That $53,600,000 shall be 
paid to the Federal Transit Administration's administrative 
expenses account: Provided further, That $4,800,000 shall be 
paid to the Federal Transit Administration's university 
transportation research account: Provided further, That 
$100,000,000 shall be paid to the Federal Transit 
Administration's job access and reverse commute grants program: 
Provided further, That $2,272,800,000 shall be paid to the 
Federal Transit Administration's capital investment grants 
account.

                       Capital Investment Grants


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5308, 5309, 
5318, and 5327, $568,200,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That no more than $2,841,000,000 of budget 
authority shall be available for these purposes: Provided 
further, That there shall be available for fixed guideway 
modernization, $1,136,400,000; there shall be available for the 
replacement, rehabilitation, and purchase of buses and related 
equipment and the construction of bus-related facilities, 
$568,200,000, together with $50,000,000 transferred from 
``Federal Transit Administration, Formula Grants''; and there 
shall be available for new fixed guideway systems 
$1,136,400,000, together with $1,488,840 of the funds made 
available under ``Federal Transit Administration, Capital 
investment grants'' in Public Law 105-277; to be available as 
follows:
            $10,296,000 for Alaska or Hawaii ferry projects;
            $1,000,000 for the Albuquerque, New Mexico, light 
        rail project;
            $25,000,000 for the Atlanta, Georgia, North line 
        extension project;
            $13,000,000 for the Baltimore, Maryland, central 
        light rail transit double track project;
            $1,500,000 for the Baltimore, Maryland, rail 
        transit project;
            $2,000,000 for the Birmingham, Alabama, transit 
        corridor project;
            $10,631,245 for the Boston, Massachusetts, South 
        Boston Piers transitway project;
            $500,000 for the Boston, Massachusetts, urban ring 
        transit project;
            $7,000,000 for the Charlotte, North Carolina, South 
        corridor light rail transit project;
            $32,750,000 for the Chicago, Illinois, Douglas 
        branch reconstruction project;
            $55,000,000 for the Chicago, Illinois, METRA 
        commuter rail and line extension projects;
            $3,000,000 for the Chicago, Illinois, Ravenswood 
        reconstruction project;
            $6,000,000 for the Cleveland, Ohio, Euclid corridor 
        transportation project;
            $70,000,000 for the Dallas, Texas, North Central 
        light rail transit extension project;
            $55,000,000 for the Denver, Colorado, Southeast 
        corridor light rail transit project;
            $192,492 for the Denver, Colorado, Southwest 
        corridor light rail transit project;
            $150,000 for the Des Moines, Iowa, DSM bus 
        feasibility project;
            $200,000 for the Dubuque, Iowa, light rail 
        feasibility project;
            $25,000,000 for the Dulles corridor, Virginia, bus 
        rapid transit project;
            $27,000,000 for the Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Tri-
        County commuter rail upgrades project;
            $2,000,000 for the Fort Worth, Texas, Trinity 
        railway express project;
            $750,000 for the Grand Rapids, Michigan, ITP metro 
        area, major corridor project;
            $12,000,000 for Honolulu, Hawaii, bus rapid transit 
        project;
            $10,000,000 for the Houston, Texas, Metro advanced 
        transit project;
            $300,000 for the Iowa, Metrolink light rail 
        feasibility project;
            $1,500,000 for the Johnson County, Kansas-Kansas 
        City, Missouri, I-35 commuter rail project;
            $2,000,000 for the Kenosha-Racine-Milwaukee, 
        Wisconsin, commuter rail extension project;
            $55,000,000 for the Largo, Maryland, metrorail 
        extension project;
            $2,000,000 for the Little Rock, Arkansas, river 
        rail project;
            $14,744,420 for the Long Island Rail Road, New 
        York, East Side access project;
            $9,289,557 for the Los Angeles, California, North 
        Hollywood extension project;
            $7,500,000 for the Los Angeles, California, East 
        Side corridor light rail transit project;
            $3,000,000 for the Lowell, Massachusetts-Nashua, 
        New Hampshire commuter rail extension project;
            $12,000,000 for the Maryland (MARC) commuter rail 
        improvements projects;
            $19,170,000 for the Memphis, Tennessee, Medical 
        center rail extension project;
            $5,000,000 for the Miami, Florida, South Miami-Dade 
        busway extension project;
            $10,000,000 for the Minneapolis-Rice, Minnesota, 
        Northstar corridor commuter rail project;
            $50,000,000 for the Minneapolis-St. Paul, 
        Minnesota, Hiawatha corridor light rail transit 
        project;
            $4,000,000 for the Nashville, Tennessee, East 
        corridor commuter rail project;
            $141,000,000 for the New Jersey Hudson-Bergen light 
        rail transit project;
            $15,000,000 for the New Orleans, Louisiana, Canal 
        Street car line project;
            $1,200,000 for the New Orleans, Louisiana, Desire 
        corridor streetcar project;
            $2,000,000 for the New York, New York, Second 
        Avenue subway project;
            $20,000,000 for the Newark-Elizabeth, New Jersey, 
        rail link project;
            $2,500,000 for the Northeast Indianapolis, Indiana, 
        downtown corridor project;
            $2,500,000 for the Northern Indiana South Shore 
        commuter rail project;
            $6,500,000 for the Oceanside-Escondido, California, 
        light rail extension project;
            $500,000 for the Ohio, Central Ohio North corridor 
        rail (COTA) project;
            $5,000,000 for the Pawtucket-TF Green, Rhode 
        Island, commuter rail and maintenance facility project;
            $9,000,000 for the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
        Schuykill Valley metro project;
            $10,000,000 for the Phoenix, Arizona, Central 
        Phoenix/East Valley corridor project;
            $8,000,000 for the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, North 
        Shore connector light rail transit project;
            $18,000,000 for the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, stage 
        II light rail transit reconstruction project;
            $64,000,000 for the Portland, Oregon, Interstate 
        MAX light rail transit extension project;
            $20,000,000 for the Puget Sound, Washington, RTA 
        Sounder commuter rail project;
            $9,000,000 for the Raleigh, North Carolina, 
        Triangle transit project;
            $328,000 for the Sacramento, California, light rail 
        transit extension project;
            $14,000,000 for the Salt Lake City, Utah, CBD to 
        University light rail transit project;
            $3,000,000 for the Salt Lake City, Utah, University 
        Medical Center light rail transit extension project;
            $60,000,000 for the San Diego, California, Mission 
        Valley East light rail transit extension project;
            $1,000,000 for the San Diego, California, Mid Coast 
        corridor project;
            $75,673,790 for the San Francisco, California, BART 
        extension to the airport project;
            $113,336 for the San Jose, California, Tasman West 
        light rail transit project;
            $40,000,000 for the San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tren 
        Urbano project;
            $1,700,000 for the Sioux City, Iowa, light rail 
        project;
            $28,000,000 for the St. Louis-St. Clair, Missouri, 
        metrolink extension project;
            $5,000,000 for the Stamford, Connecticut, urban 
        transitway project;
    $3,000,000 for the Stockton, California, Altamont commuter 
rail project;
            $3,000,000 for the Virginia Railway Express station 
        improvements project;
            $500,000 for the Washington County, Oregon, 
        Wilsonville to Beaverton commuter rail project;
            $2,500,000 for the Wasilla, Alaska, alternative 
        route project; and
            $400,000 for the Yosemite, California, area 
        regional transportation system project.

                 Job Access and Reverse Commute Grants

    Notwithstanding section 3037(l)(3) of Public Law 105-178, 
as amended, for necessary expenses to carry out section 3037 of 
the Federal Transit Act of 1998, $25,000,000, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That no more than 
$125,000,000 of budget authority shall be available for these 
purposes: Provided further, That up to $250,000 of the funds 
provided under this heading may be used by the Federal Transit 
Administration for technical assistance and support and 
performance reviews of the Job Access and Reverse Commute 
Grants program.

             SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

             Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation

    The Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation is hereby 
authorized to make such expenditures, within the limits of 
funds and borrowing authority available to the Corporation, and 
in accord with law, and to make such contracts and commitments 
without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by 
section 104 of the Government Corporation Control Act, as 
amended, as may be necessary in carrying out the programs set 
forth in the Corporation's budget for the current fiscal year.

                       Operations and Maintenance


                    (harbor maintenance trust fund)


    For necessary expenses for operations and maintenance of 
those portions of the Saint Lawrence Seaway operated and 
maintained by the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development 
Corporation, $13,345,000, to be derived from the Harbor 
Maintenance Trust Fund, pursuant to Public Law 99-662.

              RESEARCH AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS ADMINISTRATION

                     Research and Special Programs

    For expenses necessary to discharge the functions of the 
Research and Special Programs Administration, $37,279,000, of 
which $645,000 shall be derived from the Pipeline Safety Fund, 
and of which $2,170,000 shall remain available until September 
30, 2004: Provided, That up to $1,200,000 in fees collected 
under 49 U.S.C. 5108(g) shall be deposited in the general fund 
of the Treasury as offsetting receipts: Provided further, That 
there may be credited to this appropriation, to be available 
until expended, funds received from States, counties, 
municipalities, other public authorities, and private sources 
for expenses incurred for training, for reports publication and 
dissemination, and for travel expenses incurred in performance 
of hazardous materials exemptions and approvals functions.

                            Pipeline Safety


                         (pipeline safety fund)


                    (oil spill liability trust fund)


    For expenses necessary to conduct the functions of the 
pipeline safety program, for grants-in-aid to carry out a 
pipeline safety program, as authorized by 49 U.S.C. 60107, and 
to discharge the pipeline program responsibilities of the Oil 
Pollution Act of 1990, $58,250,000, of which $7,864,000 shall 
be derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund and shall 
remain available until September 30, 2004; of which $50,386,000 
shall be derived from the Pipeline Safety Fund, of which 
$30,828,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2004.

                     Emergency Preparedness Grants


                     (emergency preparedness fund)


    For necessary expenses to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5127(c), 
$200,000, to be derived from the Emergency Preparedness Fund, 
to remain available until September 30, 2004: Provided, That 
not more than $14,300,000 shall be made available for 
obligation in fiscal year 2002 from amounts made available by 
49 U.S.C. 5116(i) and 5127(d): Provided further, That none of 
the funds made available by 49 U.S.C. 5116(i) and 5127(d) shall 
be made available for obligation by individuals other than the 
Secretary of Transportation, or his designee.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

                         Salaries and Expenses

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
to carry out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, $50,614,000: Provided, That the Inspector 
General shall have all necessary authority, in carrying out the 
duties specified in the Inspector General Act, as amended (5 
U.S.C. App. 3) to investigate allegations of fraud, including 
false statements to the government (18 U.S.C. 1001), by any 
person or entity that is subject to regulation by the 
Department: Provided further, That the funds made available 
under this heading shall be used to investigate, pursuant to 
section 41712 of title 49, United States Code: (1) unfair or 
deceptive practices and unfair methods of competition by 
domestic and foreign air carriers and ticket agents; and (2) 
the compliance of domestic and foreign air carriers with 
respect to item (1) of this proviso.

                      SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD

                         Salaries and Expenses

    For necessary expenses of the Surface Transportation Board, 
including services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $18,457,000: 
Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, not 
to exceed $950,000 from fees established by the Chairman of the 
Surface Transportation Board shall be credited to this 
appropriation as offsetting collections and used for necessary 
and authorized expenses under this heading: Provided further, 
That the sum herein appropriated from the general fund shall be 
reduced on a dollar-for-dollar basis as such offsetting 
collections are received during fiscal year 2002, to result in 
a final appropriation from the general fund estimated at no 
more than $17,507,000.

                                TITLE II

                            RELATED AGENCIES

       ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD

                         Salaries and Expenses

    For expenses necessary for the Architectural and 
Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, as authorized by 
section 502 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 
$5,015,000: Provided, That, notwithstanding any other provision 
of law, there may be credited to this appropriation funds 
received for publications and training expenses.

                  NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD

                         Salaries and Expenses

    For necessary expenses of the National Transportation 
Safety Board, including hire of passenger motor vehicles and 
aircraft; services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates 
for individuals not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to 
the rate for a GS-15; uniforms, or allowances therefor, as 
authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5901-5902) $68,000,000, of which 
not to exceed $2,000 may be used for official reception and 
representation expenses.

                               TITLE III

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS


                     (including transfers of funds)


    Sec. 301. During the current fiscal year applicable 
appropriations to the Department of Transportation shall be 
available for maintenance and operation of aircraft; hire of 
passenger motor vehicles and aircraft; purchase of liability 
insurance for motor vehicles operating in foreign countries on 
official department business; and uniforms, or allowances 
therefor, as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5901-5902).
    Sec. 302. Such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 
2002 pay raises for programs funded in this Act shall be 
absorbed within the levels appropriated in this Act or previous 
appropriations Acts.
    Sec. 303. Appropriations contained in this Act for the 
Department of Transportation shall be available for services as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for individuals not 
to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the rate for an 
Executive Level IV.
    Sec. 304. None of the funds in this Act shall be available 
for salaries and expenses of more than 105 political and 
Presidential appointees in the Department of Transportation: 
Provided, That none of the personnel covered by this provision 
or political and Presidential appointees in an independent 
agency funded in this Act may be assigned on temporary detail 
outside the Department of Transportation or such independent 
agency except to the Office of Homeland Security.
    Sec. 305. None of the funds in this Act shall be used for 
the planning or execution of any program to pay the expenses 
of, or otherwise compensate, non-Federal parties intervening in 
regulatory or adjudicatory proceedings funded in this Act.
    Sec. 306. None of the funds appropriated in this Act shall 
remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year, 
nor may any be transferred to other appropriations, unless 
expressly so provided herein.
    Sec. 307. The expenditure of any appropriation under this 
Act for any consulting service through procurement contract 
pursuant to section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, shall 
be limited to those contracts where such expenditures are a 
matter of public record and available for public inspection, 
except where otherwise provided under existing law, or under 
existing Executive order issued pursuant to existing law.
    Sec. 308. None of the funds in this Act shall be used to 
implement section 404 of title 23, United States Code.
    Sec. 309. The limitations on obligations for the programs 
of the Federal Transit Administration shall not apply to any 
authority under 49 U.S.C. 5338, previously made available for 
obligation, or to any other authority previously made available 
for obligation.
    Sec. 310. (a) For fiscal year 2002, the Secretary of 
Transportation shall--
            (1) not distribute from the obligation limitation 
        for Federal-aid Highways amounts authorized for 
        administrative expenses and programs funded from the 
        administrative takedown authorized by section 
        104(a)(1)(A) of title 23, United States Code, for the 
        highway use tax evasion program, amounts provided under 
        section 110 of title 23, United States Code, and for 
        the Bureau of Transportation Statistics;
            (2) not distribute an amount from the obligation 
        limitation for Federal-aid Highways that is equal to 
        the unobligated balance of amounts made available from 
        the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit 
        Account) for Federal-aid highways and highway safety 
        programs for the previous fiscal year the funds for 
        which are allocated by the Secretary;
            (3) determine the ratio that--
                    (A) the obligation limitation for Federal-
                aid Highways less the aggregate of amounts not 
                distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2), bears 
                to
                    (B) the total of the sums authorized to be 
                appropriated for Federal-aid highways and 
                highway safety construction programs (other 
                than sums authorized to be appropriated for 
                sections set forth in paragraphs (1) through 
                (7) of subsection (b) and sums authorized to be 
                appropriated for section 105 of title 23, 
                United States Code, equal to the amount 
                referred to in subsection (b)(8)) for such 
                fiscal year less the aggregate of the amounts 
                not distributed under paragraph (1) of this 
                subsection;
            (4) distribute the obligation limitation for 
        Federal-aid Highways less the aggregate amounts not 
        distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2) of section 117 
        of title 23, United States Code (relating to high 
        priority projects program), section 201 of the 
        Appalachian Regional Development Act of 1965, the 
        Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge Authority Act of 1995, 
        and $2,000,000,000 for such fiscal year under section 
        105 of title 23, United States Code (relating to 
        minimum guarantee) so that the amount of obligation 
        authority available for each of such sections is equal 
        to the amount determined by multiplying the ratio 
        determined under paragraph (3) by the sums authorized 
        to be appropriated for such section (except in the case 
        of section 105, $2,000,000,000) for such fiscal year;
            (5) distribute the obligation limitation provided 
        for Federal-aid Highways less the aggregate amounts not 
        distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2) and amounts 
        distributed under paragraph (4) for each of the 
        programs that are allocated by the Secretary under 
        title 23, United States Code (other than activities to 
        which paragraph (1) applies and programs to which 
        paragraph (4) applies) by multiplying the ratio 
        determined under paragraph (3) by the sums authorized 
        to be appropriated for such program for such fiscal 
        year; and
            (6) distribute the obligation limitation provided 
        for Federal-aid Highways less the aggregate amounts not 
        distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2) and amounts 
        distributed under paragraphs (4) and (5) for Federal-
        aid highways and highway safety construction programs 
        (other than the minimum guarantee program, but only to 
        the extent that amounts apportioned for the minimum 
        guarantee program for such fiscal year exceed 
        $2,639,000,000, and the Appalachian development highway 
        system program) that are apportioned by the Secretary 
        under title 23, United States Code, in the ratio that--
                    (A) sums authorized to be appropriated for 
                such programs that are apportioned to each 
                State for such fiscal year, bear to
                    (B) the total of the sums authorized to be 
                appropriated for such programs that are 
                apportioned to all States for such fiscal year.
    (b) Exceptions From Obligation Limitation.--The obligation 
limitation for Federal-aid Highways shall not apply to 
obligations: (1) under section 125 of title 23, United States 
Code; (2) under section 147 of the Surface Transportation 
Assistance Act of 1978; (3) under section 9 of the Federal-Aid 
Highway Act of 1981; (4) under sections 131(b) and 131( j) of 
the Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 1982; (5) under 
sections 149(b) and 149(c) of the Surface Transportation and 
Uniform Relocation Assistance Act of 1987; (6) under sections 
1103 through 1108 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation 
Efficiency Act of 1991; (7) under section 157 of title 23, 
United States Code, as in effect on the day before the date of 
the enactment of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st 
Century; and (8) under section 105 of title 23, United States 
Code (but, only in an amount equal to $639,000,000 for such 
fiscal year).
    (c) Redistribution of Unused Obligation Authority.--
Notwithstanding subsection (a), the Secretary shall after 
August 1 for such fiscal year revise a distribution of the 
obligation limitation made available under subsection (a) if a 
State will not obligate the amount distributed during that 
fiscal year and redistribute sufficient amounts to those States 
able to obligate amounts in addition to those previously 
distributed during that fiscal year giving priority to those 
States having large unobligated balances of funds apportioned 
under sections 104 and 144 of title 23, United States Code, 
section 160 (as in effect on the day before the enactment of 
the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century) of title 
23, United States Code, and under section 1015 of the 
Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (105 
Stat. 1943-1945).
    (d) Applicability of Obligation Limitations to 
Transportation Research Programs.--The obligation limitation 
shall apply to transportation research programs carried out 
under chapter 5 of title 23, United States Code, except that 
obligation authority made available for such programs under 
such limitation shall remain available for a period of 3 fiscal 
years.
    (e) Redistribution of Certain Authorized Funds.--Not later 
than 30 days after the date of the distribution of obligation 
limitation under subsection (a), the Secretary shall distribute 
to the States any funds: (1) that are authorized to be 
appropriated for such fiscal year for Federal-aid highways 
programs (other than the program under section 160 of title 23, 
United States Code) and for carrying out subchapter I of 
chapter 311 of title 49, United States Code, and highway-
related programs under chapter 4 of title 23, United States 
Code; and (2) that the Secretary determines will not be 
allocated to the States, and will not be available for 
obligation, in such fiscal year due to the imposition of any 
obligation limitation for such fiscal year. Such distribution 
to the States shall be made in the same ratio as the 
distribution of obligation authority under subsection (a)(6). 
The funds so distributed shall be available for any purposes 
described in section 133(b) of title 23, United States Code.
    (f) Special Rule.--Obligation limitation distributed for a 
fiscal year under subsection (a)(4) of this section for a 
section set forth in subsection (a)(4) shall remain available 
until used and shall be in addition to the amount of any 
limitation imposed on obligations for Federal-aid highway and 
highway safety construction programs for future fiscal years.
    Sec. 311. (a) No recipient of funds made available in this 
Act shall disseminate personal information (as defined in 18 
U.S.C. 2725(3)) obtained by a State department of motor 
vehicles in connection with a motor vehicle record as defined 
in 18 U.S.C. 2725(1), except as provided in 18 U.S.C. 2721 for 
a use permitted under 18 U.S.C. 2721.
    (b) Notwithstanding subsection (a), the Secretary shall not 
withhold funds provided in this Act for any grantee if a State 
is in noncompliance with this provision.
    Sec. 312. None of the funds in this Act shall be available 
to plan, finalize, or implement regulations that would 
establish a vessel traffic safety fairway less than five miles 
wide between the Santa Barbara Traffic Separation Scheme and 
the San Francisco Traffic Separation Scheme.
    Sec. 313. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
airports may transfer, without consideration, to the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA) instrument landing systems (along 
with associated approach lighting equipment and runway visual 
range equipment) which conform to FAA design and performance 
specifications, the purchase of which was assisted by a Federal 
airport-aid program, airport development aid program or airport 
improvement program grant: Provided, That, the Federal Aviation 
Administration shall accept such equipment, which shall 
thereafter be operated and maintained by FAA in accordance with 
agency criteria.
    Sec. 314. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, and 
except for fixed guideway modernization projects, funds made 
available by this Act under ``Federal Transit Administration, 
Capital investment grants'' for projects specified in this Act 
or identified in reports accompanying this Act not obligated by 
September 30, 2004, and other recoveries, shall be made 
available for other projects under 49 U.S.C. 5309.
    Sec. 315. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any 
funds appropriated before October 1, 2001, under any section of 
chapter 53 of title 49, United States Code, that remain 
available for expenditure may be transferred to and 
administered under the most recent appropriation heading for 
any such section.
    Sec. 316. None of the funds in this Act may be used to 
compensate in excess of 335 technical staff-years under the 
federally funded research and development center contract 
between the Federal Aviation Administration and the Center for 
Advanced Aviation Systems Development during fiscal year 2002.
    Sec. 317. Funds received by the Federal Highway 
Administration, Federal Transit Administration, and Federal 
Railroad Administration from States, counties, municipalities, 
other public authorities, and private sources for expenses 
incurred for training may be credited respectively to the 
Federal Highway Administration's ``Federal-Aid Highways'' 
account, the Federal Transit Administration's ``Transit 
Planning and Research'' account, and to the Federal Railroad 
Administration's ``Safety and Operations'' account, except for 
State rail safety inspectors participating in training pursuant 
to 49 U.S.C. 20105.
    Sec. 318. Of the funds made available under section 
1101(a)(12) and section 1503 of Public Law 105-178, as amended, 
$52,973,000 are rescinded.
    Sec. 319. Beginning in fiscal year 2002 and thereafter, the 
Secretary may use up to 1 percent of the amounts made available 
to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5309 for oversight activities under 49 
U.S.C. 5327.
    Sec. 320. Funds made available for Alaska or Hawaii ferry 
boats or ferry terminal facilities pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 
5309(m)(2)(B) may be used to construct new vessels and 
facilities, or to improve existing vessels and facilities, 
including both the passenger and vehicle-related elements of 
such vessels and facilities, and for repair facilities: 
Provided, That not more than $3,000,000 of the funds made 
available pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 5309(m)(2)(B) may be used by 
the State of Hawaii to initiate and operate a passenger 
ferryboat services demonstration project to test the viability 
of different intra-island and inter-island ferry routes.
    Sec. 321. Notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, funds received by 
the Bureau of Transportation Statistics from the sale of data 
products, for necessary expenses incurred pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 
111 may be credited to the Federal-aid highways account for the 
purpose of reimbursing the Bureau for such expenses: Provided, 
That such funds shall be subject to the obligation limitation 
for Federal-aid highways and highway safety construction.
    Sec. 322. Section 3030(a) of the Transportation Equity Act 
for the 21st Century (Public Law 105-178) is amended by adding 
at the end, the following line: ``Washington County--
Wilsonville to Beaverton commuter rail.''.
    Sec. 323. Section 3030(b) of the Transportation Equity Act 
for the 21st Century (Public Law 105-178) is amended by adding 
at the end the following: ``Detroit, Michigan Metropolitan 
Airport rail project.''.
    Sec. 324. None of the funds in this Act may be obligated or 
expended for employee training which: (a) does not meet 
identified needs for knowledge, skills and abilities bearing 
directly upon the performance of official duties; (b) contains 
elements likely to induce high levels of emotional response or 
psychological stress in some participants; (c) does not require 
prior employee notification of the content and methods to be 
used in the training and written end of course evaluations; (d) 
contains any methods or content associated with religious or 
quasi-religious belief systems or ``new age'' belief systems as 
defined in Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Notice N-
915.022, dated September 2, 1988; (e) is offensive to, or 
designed to change, participants' personal values or lifestyle 
outside the workplace; or (f) includes content related to human 
immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome 
(HIV/AIDS) other than that necessary to make employees more 
aware of the medical ramifications of HIV/AIDS and the 
workplace rights of HIV-positive employees.
    Sec. 325. None of the funds in this Act shall, in the 
absence of express authorization by Congress, be used directly 
or indirectly to pay for any personal service, advertisement, 
telegraph, telephone, letter, printed or written material, 
radio, television, video presentation, electronic 
communications, or other device, intended or designed to 
influence in any manner a Member of Congress or of a State 
legislature to favor or oppose by vote or otherwise, any 
legislation or appropriation by Congress or a State legislature 
after the introduction of any bill or resolution in Congress 
proposing such legislation or appropriation, or after the 
introduction of any bill or resolution in a State legislature 
proposing such legislation or appropriation: Provided, That 
this shall not prevent officers or employees of the Department 
of Transportation or related agencies funded in this Act from 
communicating to Members of Congress or to Congress, on the 
request of any Member, or to members of State legislature, or 
to a State legislature, through the proper official channels, 
requests for legislation or appropriations which they deem 
necessary for the efficient conduct of business.
    Sec. 326. (a) In General.--None of the funds made available 
in this Act may be expended by an entity unless the entity 
agrees that in expending the funds the entity will comply with 
the Buy American Act (41 U.S.C. 10a-10c).
    (b) Sense of the Congress; Requirement Regarding Notice.--
            (1) Purchase of american-made equipment and 
        products.--In the case of any equipment or product that 
        may be authorized to be purchased with financial 
        assistance provided using funds made available in this 
        Act, it is the sense of the Congress that entities 
        receiving the assistance should, in expending the 
        assistance, purchase only American-made equipment and 
        products to the greatest extent practicable.
            (2) Notice to recipients of assistance.--In 
        providing financial assistance using funds made 
        available in this Act, the head of each Federal agency 
        shall provide to each recipient of the assistance a 
        notice describing the statement made in paragraph (1) 
        by the Congress.
    (c) Prohibition of Contracts With Persons Falsely Labeling 
Products as Made in America.--If it has been finally determined 
by a court or Federal agency that any person intentionally 
affixed a label bearing a ``Made in America'' inscription, or 
any inscription with the same meaning, to any product sold in 
or shipped to the United States that is not made in the United 
States, the person shall be ineligible to receive any contract 
or subcontract made with funds made available in this Act, 
pursuant to the debarment, suspension, and ineligibility 
procedures described in sections 9.400 through 9.409 of title 
48, Code of Federal Regulations.
    Sec. 327. Rebates, refunds, incentive payments, minor fees 
and other funds received by the Department from travel 
management centers, charge card programs, the subleasing of 
building space, and miscellaneous sources are to be credited to 
appropriations of the Department and allocated to elements of 
the Department using fair and equitable criteria and such funds 
shall be available until December 31, 2002.
    Sec. 328. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, rule 
or regulation, the Secretary of Transportation is authorized to 
allow the issuer of any preferred stock heretofore sold to the 
Department to redeem or repurchase such stock upon the payment 
to the Department of an amount determined by the Secretary.
    Sec. 329. For necessary expenses of the Amtrak Reform 
Council authorized under section 203 of Public Law 105-134, 
$225,000.
    Sec. 330. In addition to amounts otherwise made available 
in this Act, to enable the Secretary of Transportation to make 
grants for surface transportation projects, $144,000,000, to 
remain available until expended.
    Sec. 331. During fiscal year 2002, for providing support to 
the Department of Defense, the Coast Guard Yard and other Coast 
Guard specialized facilities designated by the Commandant shall 
qualify as components of the Department of Defense for 
competition and workload assignment purposes: Provided, That in 
addition, for purposes of entering into joint public-private 
partnerships and other cooperative arrangements for the 
performance of work, the Coast Guard Yard and other Coast Guard 
specialized facilities may enter into agreements or other 
arrangements, receive and retain funds from and pay funds to 
such public and private entities, and may accept contributions 
of funds, materials, services, and the use of facilities from 
such entities: Provided further, That amounts received under 
this section may be credited to appropriate Coast Guard 
accounts for fiscal year 2002.
    Sec. 332. None of the funds in this Act may be used to make 
a grant unless the Secretary of Transportation notifies the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations not less than 
three full business days before any discretionary grant award, 
letter of intent, or full funding grant agreement totaling 
$1,000,000 or more is announced by the department or its modal 
administrations from: (1) any discretionary grant program of 
the Federal Highway Administration other than the emergency 
relief program; (2) the airport improvement program of the 
Federal Aviation Administration; or (3) any program of the 
Federal Transit Administration other than the formula grants 
and fixed guideway modernization programs: Provided, That no 
notification shall involve funds that are not available for 
obligation.
    Sec. 333. (a) None of the funds made available in this Act 
shall be available for the design or construction of a light 
rail system in Houston, Texas.
    (b) Notwithstanding (a), amounts made available in this Act 
under the heading ``Federal Transit Administration, Capital 
investment grants'' for a Houston, Texas, Metro advanced 
transit plan project shall be available for obligation or 
expenditure subject to the following conditions:
            (1) Sufficient amounts shall be used for major 
        investment studies in 4 major corridors.
            (2) The Texas Department of Transportation shall 
        review and comment on the findings of the studies under 
        paragraph (1). Any comments by such department on such 
        findings shall be included in any final report on such 
        studies.
            (3) If a final report on the studies under 
        paragraph (1) is not available for at least the 1-month 
        period preceding the date of any referendum held by the 
        City of Houston, Texas, or by a county of Texas, 
        regarding approval of the issuance of bonds for funding 
        a light rail system in Houston, Texas, all information 
        developed by such studies regarding passenger and cost 
        estimates for such a system shall be made available to 
        the public at least one month before the date of the 
        referendum.
    Sec. 334. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be used for engineering work related to an additional runway at 
New Orleans International Airport.
    Sec. 335. None of the funds in this Act shall be used to 
pursue or adopt guidelines or regulations requiring airport 
sponsors to provide to the Federal Aviation Administration 
without cost building construction, maintenance, utilities and 
expenses, or space in airport sponsor-owned buildings for 
services relating to air traffic control, air navigation or 
weather reporting: Provided, That the prohibition of funds in 
this section does not apply to negotiations between the agency 
and airport sponsors to achieve agreement on ``below-market'' 
rates for these items or to grant assurances that require 
airport sponsors to provide land without cost to the FAA for 
air traffic control facilities.
    Sec. 336. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
whenever an allocation is made of the sums authorized to be 
appropriated for expenditure on the Federal lands highway 
program, and whenever an apportionment is made of the sums 
authorized to be appropriated for expenditure on the surface 
transportation program, the congestion mitigation and air 
quality improvement program, the National Highway System, the 
Interstate maintenance program, the bridge program, the 
Appalachian development highway system, and the minimum 
guarantee program, the Secretary of Transportation shall deduct 
a sum in such amount not to exceed two-fifths of 1 percent of 
all sums so made available, as the Secretary determines 
necessary, to administer the provisions of law to be financed 
from appropriations for motor carrier safety programs and motor 
carrier safety research. The sum so deducted shall remain 
available until expended: Provided, That any deduction by the 
Secretary of Transportation in accordance with this paragraph 
shall be deemed to be a deduction under section 104(a)(1)(B) of 
title 23, United States Code.
    Sec. 337. For an airport project that the Administrator of 
the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) determines will add 
critical airport capacity to the national air transportation 
system, the Administrator is authorized to accept funds from an 
airport sponsor, including entitlement funds provided under the 
``Grants-in-Aid for Airports'' program, for the FAA to hire 
additional staff or obtain the services of consultants: 
Provided, That the Administrator is authorized to accept and 
utilize such funds only for the purpose of facilitating the 
timely processing, review, and completion of environmental 
activities associated with such project.
    Sec. 338. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be used to further any efforts toward developing a new regional 
airport for southeast Louisiana until a comprehensive plan is 
submitted by a commission of stakeholders to the Administrator 
of the Federal Aviation Administration and that plan, as 
approved by the Administrator, is submitted to and approved by 
the Senate Committee on Appropriations and the House Committee 
on Appropriations.
    Sec. 339. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
States may use funds provided in this Act under Section 402 of 
title 23, United States Code, to produce and place highway 
safety public service messages in television, radio, cinema and 
print media, and on the Internet in accordance with guidance 
issued by the Secretary of Transportation: Provided, That any 
State that uses funds for such public service messages shall 
submit to the Secretary a report describing and assessing the 
effectiveness of the messages: Provided further, That 
$8,000,000 of the funds allocated for innovative seat belt 
projects under section 157 of title 23, United States Code, 
shall be used by the States, as directed by the National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administrator, to purchase advertising 
in broadcast or print media to publicize the States' seat belt 
enforcement efforts during one or more of the Operation ABC 
National Mobilizations: Provided further, That up to $2,000,000 
of the funds allocated for innovative seat belt projects under 
section 157 of title 23, United States Code, shall be used by 
the Administrator to evaluate the effectiveness of State seat 
belt programs that purchase advertising as provided by this 
section.
    Sec. 340. Item 1348 of the table contained in section 1602 
of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century is 
amended by striking ``Extend West Douglas Road'' and inserting 
``Construct Gastineau Channel Second Crossing to Douglas 
Island''.
    Sec. 341. None of the funds in this Act may be obligated 
for the Office of the Secretary of Transportation to approve 
assessments or reimbursable agreements pertaining to funds 
appropriated to the modal administrations in this Act, except 
for activities underway on the date of enactment of this Act, 
unless such assessments or agreements have completed the normal 
reprogramming process for Congressional notification.
    Sec. 342. Item 642 in the table contained in section 1602 
of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, relating 
to Washington, is amended by striking ``Construct passenger 
ferry facility to serve Southworth, Seattle'' and inserting 
``Passenger only ferry to serve Kitsap and King Counties to 
Seattle''.
    Sec. 343. Item 1793 in section 1602 of the Transportation 
Equity Act for the 21st Century, relating to Washington, is 
amended by striking ``Southworth Seattle Ferry'' and inserting 
``Passenger only ferry to serve Kitsap and King Counties to 
Seattle''.
    Sec. 344. Item 576 in the table contained in section 1602 
of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (112 
Stat. 278) is amended by striking ``Bull Shoals Lake Ferry in 
Taney County'' and inserting ``Construct the Missouri Center 
for Advanced Highway Safety (MOCAHS)''.
    Sec. 345. The transit station operated by the Washington 
Metropolitan Area Transit Authority located at Ronald Reagan 
Washington National Airport, and known as the National Airport 
Station, shall be known and designated as the ``Ronald Reagan 
Washington National Airport Station''. The Washington 
Metropolitan Area Transit Authority shall modify the signs at 
the transit station, and all maps, directories, documents, and 
other records published by the Authority, to reflect the 
redesignation.
    Sec. 346. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available in this Act may be made available to any person or 
entity convicted of violating the Buy American Act (41 U.S.C. 
10a-10c).
    Sec. 347. For fiscal year 2002, notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, historic covered bridges eligible for Federal 
assistance under section 1224 of the Transportation Equity Act 
for the 21st Century, as amended, may be funded from amounts 
set aside for the discretionary bridge program.
    Sec. 348. None of the funds provided in this Act or prior 
Appropriations Acts for Coast Guard ``Acquisition, 
construction, and improvements'' shall be available after the 
fifteenth day of any quarter of any fiscal year, unless the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard first submits a quarterly report 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on all 
major Coast Guard acquisition projects including projects 
executed for the Coast Guard by the United States Navy and 
vessel traffic service projects: Provided, That such reports 
shall include an acquisition schedule, estimated current and 
year funding requirements, and a schedule of anticipated 
obligations and outlays for each major acquisition project: 
Provided further, That such reports shall rate on a relative 
scale the cost risk, schedule risk, and technical risk 
associated with each acquisition project and include a table 
detailing unobligated balances to date and anticipated 
unobligated balances at the close of the fiscal year and the 
close of the following fiscal year should the Administration's 
pending budget request for the acquisition, construction, and 
improvements account be fully funded: Provided further, That 
such reports shall also provide abbreviated information on the 
status of shore facility construction and renovation projects: 
Provided further, That all information submitted in such 
reports shall be current as of the last day of the preceding 
quarter.
    Sec. 349. Funds provided in this Act for the Transportation 
Administrative Service Center (TASC) shall be reduced by 
$5,000,000, which limits fiscal year 2002 TASC obligational 
authority for elements of the Department of Transportation 
funded in this Act to no more than $120,323,000: Provided, That 
such reductions from the budget request shall be allocated by 
the Department of Transportation to each appropriations account 
in proportion to the amount included in each account for the 
Transportation Administrative Service Center.
    Sec. 350. Safety of Cross-Border Trucking Between United 
States and Mexico. (a) No funds limited or appropriated in this 
Act may be obligated or expended for the review or processing 
of an application by a Mexican motor carrier for authority to 
operate beyond United States municipalities and commercial 
zones on the United States-Mexico border until the Federal 
Motor Carrier Safety Administration--
            (1)(A) requires a safety examination of such motor 
        carrier to be performed before the carrier is granted 
        conditional operating authority to operate beyond 
        United States municipalities and commercial zones on 
        the United States-Mexico border;
            (B) requires the safety examination to include--
                    (i) verification of available performance 
                data and safety management programs;
                    (ii) verification of a drug and alcohol 
                testing program consistent with part 40 of 
                title 49, Code of Federal Regulations;
                    (iii) verification of that motor carrier's 
                system of compliance with hours-of-service 
                rules, including hours-of-service records;
                    (iv) verification of proof of insurance;
                    (v) a review of available data concerning 
                that motor carrier's safety history, and other 
                information necessary to determine the 
                carrier's preparedness to comply with Federal 
                Motor Carrier Safety rules and regulations and 
                Hazardous Materials rules and regulations;
                    (vi) an inspection of that Mexican motor 
                carrier's commercial vehicles to be used under 
                such operating authority, if any such 
                commercial vehicles have not received a decal 
                from the inspection required in subsection 
                (a)(5);
                    (vii) an evaluation of that motor carrier's 
                safety inspection, maintenance, and repair 
                facilities or management systems, including 
                verification of records of periodic vehicle 
                inspections;
                    (viii) verification of drivers' 
                qualifications, including a confirmation of the 
                validity of the Licencia de Federal de 
                Conductor of each driver of that motor carrier 
                who will be operating under such authority; and
                    (ix) an interview with officials of that 
                motor carrier to review safety management 
                controls and evaluate any written safety 
                oversight policies and practices.
            (C) requires that--
                    (i) Mexican motor carriers with three or 
                fewer commercial vehicles need not undergo on-
                site safety examination; however 50 percent of 
                all safety examinations of all Mexican motor 
                carriers shall be conducted onsite; and
                    (ii) such on-site inspections shall cover 
                at least 50 percent of estimated truck traffic 
                in any year.
            (2) requires a full safety compliance review of the 
        carrier consistent with the safety fitness evaluation 
        procedures set forth in part 385 of title 49, Code of 
        Federal Regulations, and gives the motor carrier a 
        satisfactory rating, before the carrier is granted 
        permanent operating authority to operate beyond United 
        States municipalities and commercial zones on the 
        United States-Mexico border, and requires that any such 
        safety compliance review take place within 18 months of 
        that motor carrier being granted conditional operating 
        authority, provided that;
                    (A) Mexican motor carriers with three or 
                fewer commercial vehicles need not undergo 
                onsite compliance review; however 50 percent of 
                all compliance reviews of all Mexican motor 
                carriers shall be conducted on-site; and
                    (B) any Mexican motor carrier with 4 or 
                more commercial vehicles that did not undergo 
                an on-site safety exam under (a)(1)(C), shall 
                undergo an on-site safety compliance review 
                under this section.
            (3) requires Federal and State inspectors to verify 
        electronically the status and validity of the license 
        of each driver of a Mexican motor carrier commercial 
        vehicle crossing the border;
                    (A) for every such vehicle carrying a 
                placardable quantity of hazardous materials;
                    (B) whenever the inspection required in 
                subsection (a)(5) is performed; and
                    (C) randomly for other Mexican motor 
                carrier commercial vehicles, but in no case 
                less than 50 percent of all other such 
                commercial vehicles.
            (4) gives a distinctive Department of 
        Transportation number to each Mexican motor carrier 
        operating beyond the commercial zone to assist 
        inspectors in enforcing motor carrier safety 
        regulations including hours-of-service rules under part 
        395 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations;
            (5) requires, with the exception of Mexican motor 
        carriers that have been granted permanent operating 
        authority for three consecutive years--
                    (A) inspections of all commercial vehicles 
                of Mexican motor carriers authorized, or 
                seeking authority to operate beyond United 
                States municipalities and commercial zones on 
                the United States-Mexico border that do not 
                display a valid Commercial Vehicle Safety 
                Alliance inspection decal, by certified 
                inspectors in accordance with the requirements 
                for a Level I Inspection under the criteria of 
                the North American Standard Inspection (as 
                defined in section 350.105 of title 49, Code of 
                Federal Regulations), including examination of 
                the driver, vehicle exterior and vehicle under-
                carriage;
                    (B) a Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance 
                decal to be affixed to each such commercial 
                vehicle upon completion of the inspection 
                required by clause (A) or a re-inspection if 
                the vehicle has met the criteria for the Level 
                I inspection; and
                    (C) that any such decal, when affixed, 
                expire at the end of a period of not more than 
                90 days, but nothing in this paragraph shall be 
                construed to preclude the Administration from 
                requiring reinspection of a vehicle bearing a 
                valid inspection decal or from requiring that 
                such a decal be removed when a certified 
                Federal or State inspector determines that such 
                a vehicle has a safety violation subsequent to 
                the inspection for which the decal was granted.
            (6) requires State inspectors who detect violations 
        of Federal motor carrier safety laws or regulations to 
        enforce them or notify Federal authorities of such 
        violations;
            (7)(A) equips all United States-Mexico commercial 
        border crossings with scales suitable for enforcement 
        action; equips 5 of the 10 such crossings that have the 
        highest volume of commercial vehicle traffic with 
        weigh-in-motion (WIM) systems; ensures that the 
        remaining 5 such border crossings are equipped within 
        12 months; requires inspectors to verify the weight of 
        each Mexican motor carrier commercial vehicle entering 
        the United States at said WIM equipped high volume 
        border crossings; and
            (B) initiates a study to determine which other 
        crossings should also be equipped with weigh-in-motion 
        systems;
            (8) the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 
        has implemented a policy to ensure that no Mexican 
        motor carrier will be granted authority to operate 
        beyond United States municipalities and commercial 
        zones on the United States-Mexico border unless that 
        carrier provides proof of valid insurance with an 
        insurance company licensed in the United States;
            (9) requires commercial vehicles operated by a 
        Mexican motor carrier to enter the United States only 
        at commercial border crossings where and when a 
        certified motor carrier safety inspector is on duty and 
        where adequate capacity exists to conduct a sufficient 
        number of meaningful vehicle safety inspections and to 
        accommodate vehicles placed out-of-service as a result 
        of said inspections.
            (10) publishes--
                    (A) interim final regulations under section 
                210(b) of the Motor Carrier Safety Improvement 
                Act of 1999 (49 U.S.C. 31144 nt.) that 
                establish minimum requirements for motor 
                carriers, including foreign motor carriers, to 
                ensure they are knowledgeable about Federal 
                safety standards, that may include the 
                administration of a proficiency examination;
                    (B) interim final regulations under section 
                31148 of title 49, United States Code, that 
                implement measures to improve training and 
                provide for the certification of motor carrier 
                safety auditors;
                    (C) a policy under sections 218(a) and (b) 
                of that Act (49 U.S.C. 31133 nt.) establishing 
                standards for the determination of the 
                appropriate number of Federal and State motor 
                carrier inspectors for the United States-Mexico 
                border;
                    (D) a policy under section 219(d) of that 
                Act (49 U.S.C. 14901 nt.) that prohibits 
                foreign motor carriers from leasing vehicles to 
                another carrier to transport products to the 
                United States while the lessor is subject to a 
                suspension, restriction, or limitation on its 
                right to operate in the United States; and
                    (E) a policy under section 219(a) of that 
                Act (49 U.S.C. 14901 nt.) that prohibits 
                foreign motor carriers from operating in the 
                United States that is found to have operated 
                illegally in the United States.
    (b) No vehicles owned or leased by a Mexican motor carrier 
and carrying hazardous materials in a placardable quantity may 
be permitted to operate beyond a United States municipality or 
commercial zone until the United States has completed an 
agreement with the Government of Mexico which ensures that 
drivers of such vehicles carrying such placardable quantities 
of hazardous materials meet substantially the same requirements 
as U.S. drivers carrying such materials.
    (c) No vehicles owned or leased by a Mexican motor carrier 
may be permitted to operate beyond United States municipalities 
and commercial zones under conditional or permanent operating 
authority granted by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration until--
            (1) the Department of Transportation Inspector 
        General conducts a comprehensive review of border 
        operations within 180 days of enactment to verify 
        that--
                    (A) all new inspector positions funded 
                under this Act have been filled and the 
                inspectors have been fully trained;
                    (B) each inspector conducting on-site 
                safety compliance reviews in Mexico consistent 
                with the safety fitness evaluation procedures 
                set forth in part 385 of title 49, Code of 
                Federal Regulations, is fully trained as a 
                safety specialist;
                    (C) the requirement of subparagraph (a)(2) 
                has not been met by transferring experienced 
                inspectors from other parts of the United 
                States to the United States-Mexico border, 
                undermining the level of inspection coverage 
                and safety elsewhere in the United States;
                    (D) the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
                Administration has implemented a policy to 
                ensure compliance with hours-of-service rules 
                under part 395 of title 49, Code of Federal 
                Regulations, by Mexican motor carriers seeking 
                authority to operate beyond United States 
                municipalities and commercial zones on the 
                United States-Mexico border;
                    (E) the information infrastructure of the 
                Mexican government is sufficiently accurate, 
                accessible, and integrated with that of U.S. 
                law enforcement authorities to allow U.S. 
                authorities to verify the status and validity 
                of licenses, vehicle registrations, operating 
                authority and insurance of Mexican motor 
                carriers while operating in the United States, 
                and that adequate telecommunications links 
                exist at all United States-Mexico border 
                crossings used by Mexican motor carrier 
                commercial vehicles, and in all mobile 
                enforcement units operating adjacent to the 
                border, to ensure that licenses, vehicle 
                registrations, operating authority and 
                insurance information can be easily and quickly 
                verified at border crossings or by mobile 
                enforcement units;
                    (F) there is adequate capacity at each 
                United States-Mexico border crossing used by 
                Mexican motor carrier commercial vehicles to 
                conduct a sufficient number of meaningful 
                vehicle safety inspections and to accommodate 
                vehicles placed out-of-service as a result of 
                said inspections;
                    (G) there is an accessible database 
                containing sufficiently comprehensive data to 
                allow safety monitoring of all Mexican motor 
                carriers that apply for authority to operate 
                commercial vehicles beyond United States 
                municipalities and commercial zones on the 
                United States-Mexico border and the drivers of 
                those vehicles; and
                    (H) measures are in place to enable U.S. 
                law enforcement authorities to ensure the 
                effective enforcement and monitoring of license 
                revocation and licensing procedures of Mexican 
                motor carriers.
            (2) The Secretary of Transportation certifies in 
        writing in a manner addressing the Inspector General's 
        findings in paragraphs (c)(1)(A) through (c)(1)(H) of 
        this section that the opening of the border does not 
        pose an unacceptable safety risk to the American 
        public.
    (d) The Department of Transportation Inspector General 
shall conduct another review using the criteria in (c)(1)(A) 
through (c)(1)(H) consistent with paragraph (c) of this 
section, 180 days after the first review is completed, and at 
least annually thereafter.
    (e) For purposes of this section, the term ``Mexican motor 
carrier'' shall be defined as a Mexico-domiciled motor carrier 
operating beyond United States municipalities and commercial 
zones on the United States-Mexico border.
    (f) In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this 
Act, to be derived from the Highway Trust Fund, there is hereby 
appropriated to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration, $25,866,000 for the salary, expense, and 
capital costs associated with the requirements of this section.
    Sec. 351. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for 
the purpose of calculating the non-federal contribution to the 
net project cost of the Regional Transportation Commission 
Resort Corridor Fixed Guideway Project in Clark County, Nevada, 
the Secretary of Transportation shall include all non-federal 
contributions (whether public or private) made on or after 
January 1, 2000 for engineering, final design, and construction 
of any element or phase of the project, including any fixed 
guideway project or segment connecting to that project, and 
also shall allow non-federal funds (whether public or private) 
expended on one element or phase of the project to be used to 
meet the non-federal share requirement of any element or phase 
of the project.
    Sec. 352. (a) Findings.--Congress makes the following 
findings:
            (1) The condition of highway, railway, and waterway 
        infrastructure across the Nation varies widely and is 
        in need of improvement and investment.
            (2) Thousands of tons of hazardous materials, 
        including a very small amount of high-level radioactive 
        material, are transported along the Nation's highways, 
        railways, and waterways each year.
            (3) The volume of hazardous material transport 
        increased by over one-third in the last 25 years and is 
        expected to continue to increase. Some propose 
        significantly increasing radioactive material 
        transport.
            (4) Approximately 261,000 people were evacuated 
        across the Nation because of rail-related incidents 
        involving hazardous materials between 1978 and 1995, 
        and during that period industry reported 8 
        transportation accidents involving the small volume of 
        high level radioactive waste transported during that 
        period.
            (5) The Federal Railroad Administration has 
        significantly decreased railroad inspections and has 
        allocated few resources since 1993 to assure the 
        structural integrity of railroad bridges. Train 
        derailments have increased by 18 percent over roughly 
        the same period.
            (6) The poor condition of highway, railway, and 
        waterway infrastructure, increases in the volume of 
        hazardous material transport, and proposed increases in 
        radioactive material transport increase the risk of 
        incidents involving such materials.
            (7) Measuring the risks of hazardous or radioactive 
        material incidents and preventing such incidents 
        requires specific information concerning the condition 
        and suitability of specific transportation routes 
        contemplated for such transport to inform and enable 
        investment in related infrastructure.
            (8) Mitigating the impact of hazardous and 
        radioactive material transportation incidents requires 
        skilled, localized, and well-equipped emergency 
        response personnel along all specifically identified 
        transportation routes.
            (9) Incidents involving hazardous or radioactive 
        material transport pose threats to the public health 
        and safety, the environment, and the economy.
    (b) Study.--The Secretary of Transportation shall, in 
consultation with the Comptroller General of the United States, 
conduct a study of the effects to public health and safety, the 
environment, and the economy associated with the transportation 
of hazardous and radioactive material.
    (c) Matters to be Addressed.--The study under subsection 
(b) shall address the following matters:
            (1) Whether the Federal Government conducts or 
        reviews individualized and detailed evaluations and 
        inspections of the condition and suitability of 
        specific transportation routes for the current, and any 
        anticipated or proposed, transport of hazardous and 
        radioactive material, including whether resources and 
        information are adequate to conduct such evaluations 
        and inspections.
            (2) The costs and time required to ensure adequate 
        inspection of specific transportation routes and 
        related infrastructure and to complete the 
        infrastructure improvements necessary to ensure the 
        safety of current, and any anticipated or proposed, 
        hazardous and radioactive material transport.
            (3) Whether emergency preparedness personnel, 
        emergency response personnel, and medical personnel are 
        adequately trained and equipped to promptly respond to 
        incidents along specific transportation routes for 
        current, anticipated, or proposed hazardous and 
        radioactive material transport.
            (4) The costs and time required to ensure that 
        emergency preparedness personnel, emergency response 
        personnel, and medical personnel are adequately trained 
        and equipped to promptly respond to incidents along 
        specific transportation routes for current, 
        anticipated, or proposed hazardous and radioactive 
        material transport.
            (5) The availability of, or requirements to, 
        establish governmental and commercial information 
        collection and dissemination systems adequate to 
        provide public and emergency responders in an 
        accessible manner, with timely, complete, specific, and 
        accurate information (including databases) concerning 
        actual, proposed, or anticipated shipments by highway, 
        railway, or waterway of hazardous and radioactive 
        materials, including incidents involving the 
        transportation of such materials by those means and the 
        public safety implications of such dissemination.
    (d) Deadline for Completion.--The study under subsection 
(b) shall be completed not later than six months after the date 
of the enactment of this Act.
    (e) Report.--Upon completion of the study under subsection 
(b), the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on the 
study.
    Sec. 353. In selecting projects to carry out using funds 
apportioned under section 110 of title 23, United States Code, 
the States of Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi shall give 
priority consideration to the following projects:
            (1) Improving Johnson Ferry Road from the 
        Chattahoochee River to Abernathy Road, including the 
        bridge over the Chattahoochee River, Georgia;
            (2) Widening Abernathy Road from 2 to 4 lanes from 
        Johnson Ferry Road to Roswell Road, Georgia;
            (3) Constructing approaches to the Patton Island 
        Bridge, Alabama; and
            (4) Planning, design, engineering, and construction 
        of an interchange on I-55, at approximately mile marker 
        114, and connector roads in Madison County, 
        Mississippi.
    Sec. 354. Section 355(a) of the National Highway System 
Designation Act of 1995 (109 Stat. 624) is amended by striking 
``has achieved'' and all that follows and inserting the 
following: ``has achieved a safety belt use rate of not less 
than 50 percent.''.
    Sec. 355. Not later than 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Transportation shall 
conduct a study and submit to Congress a report on the costs 
and benefits of constructing a third bridge across the 
Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tennessee, metropolitan area.
    Sec. 356. (a) Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) Section 345 of the National Highway System 
        Designation Act of 1995 authorizes limited relief to 
        drivers of certain types of commercial motor vehicles 
        from certain restrictions on maximum driving time and 
        on-duty time.
            (2) Subsection (c) of that section requires the 
        Secretary of Transportation to determine by rulemaking 
        proceedings that the exemptions granted are not in the 
        public interest and adversely affect the safety of 
        commercial motor vehicles.
            (3) Subsection (d) of that section requires the 
        Secretary of Transportation to monitor the safety 
        performance of drivers of commercial motor vehicles who 
        are subject to an exemption under section 345 and 
        report to Congress prior to the rulemaking proceedings.
    (b) It is the sense of Congress that the Secretary of 
Transportation should not take any action that would diminish 
or revoke any exemption in effect on the date of the enactment 
of this Act for drivers of vehicles under section 345 of the 
National Highway System Designation Act of 1995 (Public Law 
104-59; 109 Stat. 613; 49 U.S.C. 31136 note) unless the 
requirements of subsections (c) and (d) of such section are 
satisfied.
    Sec. 357. Point Retreat Light Station shall be transferred 
to the Alaska Lighthouse Association consistent with the terms 
and conditions of section 416(b)(2) of Public Law 105-383.
    Sec. 358. Priority Highway Projects, Minnesota. In 
selecting projects to carry out using funds apportioned under 
section 110 of title 23, United States Code, the State of 
Minnesota shall give priority consideration to the following 
projects:
            (1) The Southeast Main and Rail Relocation Project 
        in Moorhead, Minnesota.
            (2) Improving access to and from I-35 W at Lake 
        Street in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
    Sec. 359. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Secretary of Transportation shall approve the use of funds 
apportioned under paragraphs (1) and (3) of section 104(b) of 
title 23, United States Code, for construction of Type II noise 
barriers--
            (1) at the locations identified in section 358 of 
        the Department of Transportation and Related Agencies 
        Appropriations Act, 2000 (113 Stat. 1027);
            (2) on the west side of Interstate Route 285 from 
        Henderson Mill Road to Chamblee Tucker Road in DeKalb 
        County, Georgia;
            (3) on the east and west side of Interstate Route 
        85, extending from Virginia Avenue to Metropolitan 
        Parkway in Fulton County, Georgia;
            (4) on the east and west sides of Interstate 285 
        from the South Fulton Parkway/Interstate Route 85 
        interchange north to Interstate Route 20;
            (5) on the east side of Interstate Route 75 from 
        Howell Mill Road to West Paces Ferry Road in Fulton 
        County, Georgia;
            (6) on the east and west sides of Interstate Route 
        75 between Chastain Road and Georgia State Route 92 in 
        Cobb and Cherokee Counties, Georgia; and
            (7) on the south side of Interstate 95 in Bensalem 
        Township, between exit 25 and exit 26, Bucks County, 
        Pennsylvania.
    Sec. 360. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, of 
the funds apportioned to the State of Oklahoma under section 
110 of title 23, United States Code, for fiscal year 2001, the 
$4,300,000 specified under the heading ``Federal-Aid Highways 
(Limitation on Obligations)'' in the Department of 
Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001 
(Public Law 106-346) for reconstruction of U.S. 177 in the 
vicinity of Cimarron River, Oklahoma, shall be available 
instead only for the widening of U.S. 177 from SH-33 to 32nd 
Street in Stillwater, Oklahoma, and such amount shall be 
subject to the provisions of the last proviso under such 
heading.
    Sec. 361. Section 3030(d)(3) of the Transportation Equity 
Act for the 21st Century (Public Law 105-178) is amended by 
inserting at the end:
                    ``(D) Alabama State Docks intermodal 
                passenger and freight facility.''.
    Sec. 362. Section 1105(c) of the Intermodal Surface 
Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (105 Stat. 2032) is 
amended by adding at the end the following:
            ``(44) The Louisiana Highway 1 corridor from Grand 
        Isle, Louisiana, along Louisiana Highway 1, to the 
        intersection with United States Route 90.''.
    Sec. 363. Item 425 in the table contained in section 1602 
of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (112 
Stat. 272) is amended by striking ``Extend'' and all that 
follows through ``Parish'' and inserting the following: 
``Extend and improve Louisiana Route 42 from and along U.S. 61 
to I-10 in Ascension and East Baton Rouge Parishes''.
    Sec. 364. Items 111 and 1583 in the table contained in 
section 1602 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st 
Century (112 Stat. 261 and 315), relating to Kentucky, are each 
amended by inserting after ``Paducah'' the following: ``and 
other areas in the city of Paducah and McCracken County, 
Kentucky''.
    Sec. 365. (a) Section 1105(c)(3) of the Intermodal Surface 
Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-240), as 
amended, is hereby further amended by striking: ``then to a 
Kentucky Corridor centered on the cities of Pikeville, Jenkins, 
Hazard, London, Somerset, Columbia, Bowling Green, 
Hopkinsville, Benton, and Paducah'' and inserting: ``then to a 
Kentucky Corridor centered on the cities of Pikeville, Jenkins, 
Hazard, London, and Somerset; then, generally following the 
Louie B. Nunn Parkway corridor from Somerset to Columbia, to 
Glasgow, to I-65; then to Bowling Green, Hopkinsville, Benton, 
and Paducah''.
    (b) Section 1105(e)(5)(A) of the Intermodal Surface 
Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-240), as 
amended, is hereby further amended by inserting after 
``subsection (c)(1)'', the following: ``subsection (c)(3) 
(solely as it relates to the Kentucky Corridor),''.
    Sec. 366. Section 1105(c)(18) of the Intermodal Surface 
Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-240), as 
amended, is hereby further amended by adding:
                    ``(E) In Kentucky, the corridor shall 
                utilize the existing Purchase Parkway from the 
                Tennessee state line to Interstate 24.''.
    Sec. 367. Section 1105(e)(5)(B)(i) of the Intermodal 
Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-
240), as amended, is hereby further amended by adding: ``The 
Louie B. Nunn Parkway corridor referred to in subsection (c)(3) 
shall be designated as Interstate Route 66. A state having 
jurisdiction over any segment of routes and/or corridors 
referred to in subsections (c)(3) shall erect signs identifying 
such segment that is consistent with the criteria set forth in 
subsections (e)(5)(A)(i) and (e)(5)(A)(ii) as Interstate Route 
66. Notwithstanding the provisions of subsections (e)(5)(A)(i) 
and (e)(5)(A)(ii), or any other provisions of this Act, the 
Commonwealth of Kentucky shall erect signs, as approved by the 
Secretary, identifying the routes and/or corridors described in 
subsection (c)(3) for the Commonwealth, as segments of future 
Interstate Route 66. The Purchase Parkway corridor referred to 
in subsection (c)(18)(E) shall be designated as Interstate 
Route 69. A state having jurisdiction over any segment of 
routes and/or corridors referred to in subsections (c)(18) 
shall erect signs identifying such segment that is consistent 
with the criteria set forth in subsections (e)(5)(A)(i) and 
(e)(5)(A)(ii) as Interstate Route 69. Notwithstanding the 
provisions of subsections (e)(5)(A)(i) and (e)(5)(A)(ii), or 
any other provisions of this Act, the Commonwealth of Kentucky 
shall erect signs, as approved by the Secretary, identifying 
the routes and/or corridors described in subsection (c)(18) for 
the Commonwealth, as segments of future Interstate Route 69.''.
    Sec. 368. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any 
funds made available to the southern coalition for advanced 
transportation (SCAT) in the Department of Transportation and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000, Public Law 106-69, 
under Capital Investment Grants, or identified in the 
conference report accompanying the Department of Transportation 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001, Public Law 106-
346, that remain unobligated shall be transferred to Transit 
Planning and Research and made available to the electric 
transit vehicle institute (ETVI) in Tennessee for research 
administered under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 5312.
    Sec. 369. Chapter 9 of title II of the Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 2001 (Public Law 107-20) is amended by 
deleting the heading ``(Highway Trust Fund)'' under the heading 
``Federal-aid Highways''; and inserting in the body under the 
heading ``Federal-aid Highways'' after ``available'' the 
following: ``from the Highway Trust Fund (other than the mass 
transit account) or the general fund''; and striking ``103-
311'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``103-331''.
    Sec. 370. Notwithstanding the project descriptions 
contained in table item number 865 of section 1602 of Public 
Law 105-178, table item number 77 of section 1106(a) of Public 
Law 102-240 and section 1069(d) relating to the Riverside 
Expressway in Fairmont, West Virginia, amounts available under 
such provision shall be available to carry out any project 
eligible under title 23, United States Code, in the vicinity of 
Fairmont, West Virginia.
    Sec. 371. Item 71 in the table contained in section 1602 of 
the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, Public Law 
105-178, is amended by replacing ``restore First and Main 
Streets to two-way traffic'' with ``traffic safety and 
pedestrian improvements in downtown Miamisburg''.
    Sec. 372. Item 258 in the table under the heading ``Capital 
Investment Grants'' in title I of the Department of 
Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000 
(Public Law 106-69; 113 Stat. 1006) is amended by striking 
``Killington-Sherburne satellite bus facility'' and inserting 
``Marble Valley Regional Transit District buses''.
      Sec. 373. Of the funds available in item 73 of the table 
contained in section 1106(b) of the Intermodal Surface 
Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-240), 
$5,700,000 shall be available for construction of a parking 
facility for the inner harbor/redevelopment project in Buffalo, 
New York.
      Sec. 374. Of the funds available in item 630 of the table 
contained in section 1602 of the Transportation Equity Act for 
the 21st Century (Public Law 105-178) as amended by section 
1102 of chapter 11 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2001 
(Public Law 106-554) shall be available for the construction of 
a parking facility for the inner harbor/redevelopment project 
in Buffalo, New York.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Department of Transportation 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002''.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
                                   Harold Rogers,
                                   Frank R. Wolf,
                                   Tom DeLay,
                                   Sonny Callahan,
                                   Todd Tiahrt,
                                   Robert B. Aderholt,
                                   Kay Granger,
                                   Jo Ann Emerson,
                                   John E. Sweeney,
                                   Bill Young,
                                   Martin Olav Sabo,
                                   John W. Olver,
                                   Ed Pastor,
                                   Carolyn C. Kilpatrick,
                                   Jose E. Serrano,
                                   James E. Clyburn,
                                   David R. Obey,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Patty Murray,
                                   Robert C. Byrd,
                                   Barbara A. Mikulski,
                                   Harry Reid,
                                   Herb Kohl,
                                   Richard J. Durbin,
                                   Patrick Leahy,
                                   Daniel Inouye,
                                   Richard C. Shelby,
                                   Christopher Bond,
                                   Robert F. Bennett,
                                   Ben Nighthorse Campbell,
                                   Kay Bailey Hutchison,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.

        JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate at the conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 
2299) making appropriations for the Department of 
Transportation and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2002, and for other purposes, submit the 
following joint statement to the House of Representatives and 
the Senate in explanation of the effect of the action agreed 
upon by the managers and recommended in the accompanying 
conference report.
      The Senate deleted the entire House bill after the 
enacting clause and inserted the Senate bill. The conference 
agreement includes a revised bill.

                        Congressional Directives

      The conferees agree that Executive Branch propensities 
cannot substitute for Congress' own statements concerning the 
best evidence of Congressional intentions; that is, the 
official reports of the Congress. The committee of conference 
approves report language included by the House (House Report 
107-108) or the Senate (Senate Report 107-38 accompanying the 
companion measure S. 1178) that is not changed by the 
conference. The statement of the managers, while repeating some 
report language for emphasis, is not intended to negate the 
language referred to above unless expressly provided herein.

                     Program, Project, and Activity

      During fiscal year 2002, for the purposes of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 
99-177), as amended, with respect to funds provided for the 
Department of Transportation and related agencies, the terms 
``program, project, and activity'' shall mean any item for 
which a dollar amount is contained in an appropriations Act 
(including joint resolutions providing continuing 
appropriations) or accompanying reports of the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations, or accompanying conference 
reports and joint explanatory statements of the committee of 
conference. In addition, the reductions made pursuant to any 
sequestration order to funds appropriated for ``Federal 
Aviation Administration, Facilities and equipment'' and for 
``Coast Guard, Acquisition, construction, and improvements'' 
shall be applied equally to each ``budget item'' that is listed 
under said accounts in the budget justifications submitted to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations as modified 
by subsequent appropriations Acts and accompanying committee 
reports, conference reports, or joint explanatory statements of 
the committee of conference. The conferees recognize that 
adjustments to the above allocations may be required due to 
changing program requirements or priorities. The conferees 
expect any such adjustment, if required, to be accomplished 
only through the normal reprogramming process.

                                TITLE I

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                        Office of the Secretary

                         Salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement provides $67,778,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the office of the secretary instead of 
$68,446,000 as proposed by the House and $67,349,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. New bill language is included that 
specifies amounts by office, consistent with actions in prior 
years, and limits transfers among each office to no more than 7 
percent. The bill language specifies that any transfer shall be 
submitted for approval to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations. The following table summarizes the fiscal year 
2002 appropriation for each office:

Immediate office of the Secretary.............................$1,929,000
Immediate office of the Deputy Secretary......................   619,000
Office of the General Counsel.................................13,355,000
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy.................. 3,058,000
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Aviation and 
    International Affairs..................................... 7,421,000
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs..... 7,728,000
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Government Affairs...... 2,282,000
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration..........19,250,000
Office of Public Affairs...................................... 1,723,000
Executive Secretariat......................................... 1,204,000
Board of Contract Appeals.....................................   507,000
Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization........ 1,240,000
Office of Intelligence and Security........................... 1,321,000
Office of the Chief Information Officer....................... 6,141,000

      The conferees direct the office of the secretary to 
submit its congressional justification materials in support of 
the individual offices of the offices of the secretary at the 
same level of detail provided in the congressional 
justifications presented in fiscal year 2002.
      Bill language, as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate, allows the Department to spend up to $60,000 for 
official reception and representation activities.
      The conference agreement modifies bill language that was 
contained in both the House and the Senate bills that credits 
to this appropriation up to $2,500,000 in funds received in 
user fees by excluding fees authorized in Public Law 107-71.
      Aviation consumer hotline.--The conference agreement 
includes $720,000 for the Department's Aviation Consumer 
Protection Division's consumer hotline. The conferees note that 
a hotline for consumer complaints currently exists in the 
Office of the General Counsel. However, the phone line is 
understaffed, leaving many consumers frustrated when a phone 
recording is the only place to register a complaint. This can 
cause considerable hardship for individuals with disabilities 
who may have travel complaints that warrant immediate 
attention. The conferees direct that these funds are to be used 
to establish a 1-800 disability inquiry line that is staffed 
from 7:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m. each day.
      Study of air travel services.--The conferees are 
interested in the impact the joint entry of suppliers of air 
travel services into the market for direct distribution has had 
to date on consumers, airline competition, and ticket prices.
      Accordingly, the conferees request the Office of the 
Assistant Secretary for Aviation and International Affairs 
report on its monitoring efforts pursuant to the launch of the 
joint airline distribution ventures. The report should address, 
at a minimum, the following issues raised by the Department as 
potential concerns related to such ventures:
            Deviations from plans, policies, and procedures 
        initially proposed in the joint venture's business plan 
        and contained in its charter associate agreements;
            The extent to which the joint venture has adhered 
        to its commitment to not bias displays of fares or 
        services;
            The extent to which ties between the airline-owners 
        and the ``Most Favored Nation'' clause in the charter 
        agreement have resulted in monopolistic or other anti-
        competitive market behavior; and
            Whether airline-owners of the joint ventures or 
        charter associates have acted in an anti-competitive 
        manner by choosing not to distribute fares through 
        other online distribution outlets.
      The conferees request the Office of Aviation and 
International Affairs to submit its findings to the DOT 
Inspector General's office no later than April 1, 2002, for its 
evaluation and comment. The House and Senate Transportation 
Appropriations Subcommittees request the Inspector General to 
report on these findings no later than 90 days after receiving 
the findings from the Office of Aviation and International 
Affairs.
      Reorganization.--The conferees are aware that 
consideration is being given to a reorganization of functions 
and offices within the office of the secretary and the 
department is in the process of establishing the new 
Transportation Security Administration. The conferees expect 
that any transfer of functions or reorganization must be 
formally approved by the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations through the regular reprogramming process.
      Administrative directions.--The conferees direct the 
department to submit its annual congressional justifications 
for each modal administration to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations on the date on which the 
President's budget is delivered officially to Congress.
      Assessments.--The conferees direct that assessments 
charged by the office of the secretary to modal administrations 
should be for administrative activities, not policy 
initiatives. The conferees have seen violations of this 
direction in fiscal year 2001 and will not tolerate further 
problems.

                         Office of Civil Rights

      The conference agreement provides $8,500,000 for the 
office of civil rights as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate.

                 Transportation Security Administration

      The conference agreement provides $1,250,000,000 for the 
new multi-modal Transportation Security Administration for 
civil aviation security services pursuant to Public Law 107-71. 
Neither the House nor the Senate bill contained a similar 
appropriation. The bill language specifies that the security 
fees shall be credited to this appropriation as offsetting 
collections. The bill also specifies that the general fund 
appropriation shall be reduced, as fees are collected, to 
result in an anticipated final fiscal year appropriation of 
zero.

           Transportation Planning, Research, and Development

      The conference agreement provides $11,993,000 for 
transportation planning, research, and development instead of 
$5,193,000 as proposed by the House and $15,592,000 as proposed 
by the Senate. Adjustments to the budget request shall be 
available for the following activities:

Northeast advanced vehicle consortium...................      $2,600,000
WestStart's vehicular flywheel project in the Pacific 
    Northwest...........................................       1,000,000
International ferry service from Blaine, WA to White 
    Rock, B.C...........................................         200,000
North Dakota State University system planning and 
    resource management.................................         150,000
Auburn University, AL campus transit study..............         375,000
Bypass mail system computer software and hardware 
    upgrades in Alaska..................................       2,075,000
North Puget Sound intermodal center planning study......         400,000

              Transportation Administrative Service Center

      The conference agreement includes a limitation of 
$125,323,000 on activities of the transportation administration 
service center (TASC) as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate.
      Modal usage of TASC.--The conferees direct the 
department, in its fiscal year 2003 Congressional 
justifications for each modal administration, to account for 
increases and decreases in TASC billings based on planned usage 
requested or anticipated by the modes rather than TASC as 
proposed by the House.
      Information technology omnibus procurement (ITOP).--The 
conferees direct the DOT Inspector General to conduct a 
thorough review of the ITOP program and report findings to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 
February 15, 2002 as specified in the House report.

               Minority Business Resource Center Program

      The conference agreement provides an appropriation of 
$900,000 for the minority business resource center program and 
limits the loans to $18,367,000 as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate.

                       Minority Business Outreach

      The conference agreement provides a total of $3,000,000 
for minority business outreach as proposed by the House and the 
Senate. Language pertaining to funding availability, as 
proposed by the Senate, has been deleted.

                        Payments to Air Carriers

                    (Airport and Airway Trust Fund)

      The conference agreement provides $63,000,000 for 
payments to air carriers as proposed by the House instead of 
$50,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Of this total, 
$13,000,000 is in new appropriations and the remainder is to be 
derived from overflight user fees and, if necessary, 
unobligated balances from the facilities and equipment account 
of the Federal Aviation Administration. The conference 
agreement does not include a provision contained in the Senate 
bill that tightens the eligibility criteria for communities to 
receive essential air service subsidies.

                              Coast Guard

                           Operating Expenses

      The conference agreement provides $3,382,000,000 for 
Coast Guard operating expenses instead of $3,382,588,000 as 
proposed by the House and $3,427,588,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The agreement specifies that $440,000,000 of the total 
is available only for defense-related activities instead of 
$340,000,000 as proposed by the House and $695,000,000 proposed 
by the Senate. The agreement includes $24,945,000 to be derived 
from the oil spill liability trust fund as proposed by the 
House instead of $25,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Funding for search and rescue stations, surf stations, 
and command centers.--The conference agreement specifies that 
$14,541,000 is only for increased staffing, training, and 
personnel protective gear at search and rescue stations, surf 
stations, and command centers, instead of $13,541,000 proposed 
by the Senate. Further, the agreement includes language, 
proposed by the Senate, requiring the Inspector General to 
audit and certify that these funds are being used solely to 
supplement the fiscal year 2001 level of effort in this area. 
The conferees agree that these activities are in dire need of 
increased funding, and that the Coast Guard should give search 
and rescue a higher priority for funding in future budget 
submissions.
      Specific adjustments.--The following table summarizes the 
House and Senate's proposed adjustments to the Coast Guard's 
budget request and the final conference agreement:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Conference
                                                               House bill        Senate bill        agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Budget estimate...........................................    $3,382,838,000    $3,382,838,000    $3,382,838,000
  Changes to the budget estimate:
Minor IT projects (transfer from AC&I)....................        +1,000,000  ................        +1,000,000
SCBA (transfer from AC&I).................................        +1,000,000  ................  ................
Civilian pay raise (4.6%).................................        +4,000,000  ................  ................
Selective reenlistment bonuses............................        -3,000,000  ................  ................
Aviation career continuation pay..........................          -300,000  ................  ................
Clothing maintenance allowance............................          -300,000  ................  ................
Contract costs............................................        -3,000,000  ................        -4,000,000
Operating funds--``other activities''.....................        -4,000,000  ................        -4,000,000
Local notice to mariners..................................          -925,000  ................          -888,000
Human resources information system........................        -1,173,000  ................        -1,105,000
Marine transportation system..............................          -845,000  ................          -845,000
Ice operations............................................        -4,457,000  ................  ................
Search and rescue readiness...............................       +12,000,000        +8,000,000        +9,000,000
Pay and benefits shortfalls...............................  ................       +36,750,000  ................
Amount recommended........................................     3,382,838,000     3,427,588,000     3,382,000,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Aviation depot maintenance.--The conferees agree that the 
Coast Guard should work toward developing full and open 
competition for aviation depot maintenance services of C-130 
aircraft as soon as possible, but no later than fiscal year 
2003.
      Marine Fire and Safety Association.--The conferees remain 
supportive of efforts by the Marine Fire and Safety Association 
(MFSA) to provide specialized firefighting training and retain 
an oil spill response contingency plan for the Columbia River. 
The conferees direct the Secretary to provide $255,000 to 
continue efforts by the nonprofit organization comprised of 
numerous fire departments on both sides of the Columbia River. 
The funding will be utilized to provide specialized 
communications, firefighting training and equipment, and to 
implement the oil spill response contingency plan for the 
Columbia River.
      Lighthouse conveyances.--The conference agreement 
includes sufficient funding to complete the conveyance of 
several Coast Guard lighthouse properties and improvements, as 
authorized under Public Law 105-383, that have not been 
transferred. The conferees expect the Coast Guard to convey the 
remaining authorized lighthouse properties not later than the 
end of fiscal year 2002. If the Commandant determines, by June 
31, 2002, that the Coast Guard is unable to complete any of the 
conveyances in the coming fiscal year, the conferees direct the 
Commandant to submit a report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations within fifteen days of that 
decision explaining the reasons why each property has not been 
transferred and providing an estimated date of completion of 
that transfer.

              Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements

      The conference agreement includes $636,354,000 for 
acquisition, construction, and improvement programs of the 
Coast Guard instead of $600,000,000 as proposed by the House 
and $669,323,000 as proposed by the Senate. The bill specifies 
that $20,000,000 of total funding is to be derived from the oil 
spill liability trust fund, as proposed by the Senate, instead 
of $19,956,000 proposed by the House. Consistent with past 
years and the House and Senate bills, the conference agreement 
distributes funds in the bill by budget activity.
      A table showing the distribution of this appropriation by 
project as included in the fiscal year 2002 budget estimate, 
House bill, Senate bill, and the conference agreement follows:
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

      Integrated deepwater systems (IDS).--The conference 
agreement includes $320,190,000 for the integrated deepwater 
systems (IDS) program instead of $300,000,000 proposed by the 
House and $325,200,000 proposed by the Senate. The agreement 
includes language, proposed by the House and Senate, 
prohibiting obligation of funds for the IDS systems integration 
contract until (1) certification is received from the 
Department of Transportation and the Office of Management and 
Budget that the program is fully funded in fiscal year 2003-
2007 budget plans; (2) certification is received that the 
national distress and response system modernization program is 
funded to allow for full deployment by fiscal year 2006, and 
that other essential search and rescue procurements are fully 
funded; and (3) the Department of Transportation and Office of 
Management and Budget approve a contingency procurement 
strategy for assets and capabilities encompassed by the IDS 
program. Certification authorities for the Department of 
Transportation for the above items are the Secretary or Deputy 
Secretary, as proposed by the Senate, instead of the Secretary 
or his designee, as proposed by the House. Further, the bill 
includes language, proposed by the Senate, requiring future IDS 
budget submissions to be specified to a certain level of 
detail, and making funds available for obligation for five 
years, instead of three years as proposed by the House.
      Capital investment plan.--The bill includes language, 
proposed by the Senate, specifying a rescission of $100,000 per 
day for each day after initial submission of the fiscal year 
2003 President's budget that the Coast Guard capital investment 
plan has not been submitted to the Congress. A similar 
provision is included under Federal Aviation Administration, 
``Facilities and equipment''.
      41-foot utility boat replacement.--The conference 
agreement includes $12,000,000 to begin replacement of the 
existing 41-foot utility boat fleet, instead of $18,000,000 as 
proposed by the House. The conferees do not accept Coast Guard 
statements that a full year or more will be needed to develop 
requirements and specifications for this urgently-needed 
replacement vessel. The conferees urge the Coast Guard to 
streamline and expedite the requirements process so that 
contract award for this replacement project can take place by 
the end of fiscal year 2002. In the development of 
requirements, the Coast Guard is to actively involve, and 
consider the input of, field commanders and enlisted personnel 
who operate and maintain these boats in carrying out search and 
rescue missions.
      ATC glass technology.--The conferees agree that, of the 
funds provided for aviation parts and support, $1,000,000 is 
only for the application of ambient temperature-cured (ATC) 
glass technology to Coast Guard aircraft, as proposed by the 
House.
      National distress and response system modernization 
program (NDRSMP).--The conferees believe the Secretary or 
Deputy Secretary of Transportation and the Director of OMB 
should be attendant to the following milestones in assessing 
whether the national distress and response system modernization 
program (NDRSMP) will be fully deployed by fiscal year 2006. 
Not later than the end of fiscal year 2003, the Coast Guard 
should prove, at initial operating capability (IOC), the fully 
integrated technology of the NDRSMP at two of the 46 NDRSMP 
regions and complete low rate initial production at an 
additional four regions. IOC should include: (1) the capability 
to locate distressed vessels by identifying vessels through 
identification of the origin of the communications signal; (2) 
the ability to send and receive data among Coast Guard and 
other federal and state research and rescue assets; and (3) the 
compatibility with international communications standards under 
the International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea. The 
Coast Guard should also complete the following percentages of 
the NDRSMP by the end of the corresponding years shown below:
            Fiscal year 2004: 35 percent;
            Fiscal year 2005: 70 percent; and
            Fiscal year 2006: 100 percent.
      Coast Guard Marine Safety and Rescue Station, Chicago, 
IL.--The conference agreement includes $2,000,000 for Coast 
Guard participation in reconstruction of a joint-use Coast 
Guard Marine Safety and Rescue Station along the Chicago Lake 
Michigan shoreline. Specifically, the facility would house 
Coast Guard, City of Chicago, and State of Illinois equipment 
and personnel for the purposes of air/marine search and rescue, 
port security, research, and maritime safety. The conferees 
expect the Coast Guard to work with the City of Chicago and the 
State of Illinois to plan, fund, and construct this facility. 
The conferees intend for the Chicago Coast Guard Marine Safety 
and Rescue Station to complement the air search and rescue 
station in Waukegan, Illinois and the Coast Guard Marine Safety 
Office Chicago in Burr Ridge, Illinois.

              acquisition, construction, and improvements

                             (rescissions)

      The conference agreement deletes rescissions proposed by 
the Senate totaling $8,700,000. Funding in the programs 
proposed for rescission is no longer available.

                environmental compliance and restoration

      The conference agreement includes $16,927,000 for 
environmental compliance and restoration as proposed by both 
the House and Senate.

                         alteration of bridges

      The conference agreement includes $15,466,000 for 
alteration of bridges deemed hazardous to marine navigation as 
proposed by the House and Senate. The conference agreement 
distributes these funds as follows:
                                                              Conference
        Bridge and location                                    agreement
New Orleans, LA, Florida Avenue RR/HW Bridge..................$3,250,000
Brunswick, GA, Sidney Lanier Highway Bridge................... 1,600,000
Charleston, SC, Limehouse Bridge.............................. 1,100,000
Mobile, AL, Fourteen Mile Bridge.............................. 5,741,000
Morris, IL, EJ&E Railroad Bridge.............................. 1,525,000
Galveston, TX, Galveston Causeway.............................   500,000
Boston, MA, Chelsea Street Bridge............................. 1,750,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      15,466,000

      Millenium port selection.--In an effort to expand U.S. 
trade with Latin America and South America, the State of 
Louisiana has developed the Millenium Port Commission. Funds 
were provided in fiscal years 2000 and 2001 for federal support 
of this commission's activities. The conferees encourage the 
Millenium Port Commission, cooperating Louisiana ports, and the 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to complete a detailed feasibility 
analysis of all major options for the Millenium Port by January 
1, 2002.

                              retired pay

      The conference agreement includes $876,346,000 for Coast 
Guard retired pay as proposed by both the House and the Senate. 
This is scored as a mandatory program for federal budget 
purposes. The conference agreement includes language proposed 
by the Senate authorizing these funds for the payment of 
fifteen-year career status bonuses.

                            reserve training

                     (including transfer of funds)

      The conference agreement provides $83,194,000 for reserve 
training as proposed by the House and Senate. The agreement 
allows the Reserves to reimburse Coast Guard ``Operations'' up 
to $25,800,000 for Coast Guard support of Reserve activities, 
as proposed by the House and Senate.

              Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation

      The conference agreement provides $20,222,000 for Coast 
Guard research, development, test, and evaluation instead of 
$21,722,000 as proposed by the House and Senate. The conferees 
agree that within the funding provided, $500,000 is for the 
University of Maine Advanced Engineered Wood Composites 
Center's demonstration and evaluation of engineered wood 
composites at Coast Guard facilities, instead of $1,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Columbia River Aquatic Nuisance Species Initiative 
(CRANSI).--The conferees are concerned over threats that 
invasive, non-indigenous plants and animals pose to U.S. 
waterways and the economy. Within the funds provided, the 
conferees agree that $500,000 is for the Columbia River Aquatic 
Nuisance Species Initiative (CRANSI), at the Center for Lakes 
and Reservoirs at Portland State University, to support surveys 
of non-indigenous aquatic species in the Columbia River, as 
proposed by the Senate.

                    Federal Aviation Administration

                               operations

      The conference agreement provides $6,886,000,000 for 
operating expenses of the Federal Aviation Administration 
instead of $6,870,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$6,916,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. These funds are in 
addition to amounts made available as a mandatory appropriation 
of user fees in the Federal Aviation Administration 
Reauthorization Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-264). Of the total 
amount provided, $5,773,519,000 is to be derived from the 
airport and airway trust fund, consistent with Public Law 106-
181. The total funding provided is $341,765,000 (5.2 percent) 
above the fiscal year 2001 enacted level and is the maximum 
amount authorized. The bill specifies amounts by budget 
activity, as proposed by the House, continuing a practice 
initiated in fiscal year 2001.
      Aeronautical charting and cartography.--The conference 
agreement includes language proposed by the House prohibiting 
funds for any aeronautical charting and cartography activities 
conducted by, or coordinated through, the Transportation 
Administrative Service Center.
      User fees.--The conference agreement modifies language 
proposed by the House prohibiting funds to plan, finalize, or 
implement new user fees not specifically authorized by 
Congress. The agreement prohibits funds only for the 
finalization or implementation of new, unauthorized fees.
      Use of credit hours.--The conferees direct FAA to 
discontinue the granting of credit hours, or related benefits, 
in the settlement of union grievances until the OST office of 
general counsel, working with legal counsel of the FAA and OIG, 
determines in writing that such practice is consistent with the 
1998 collective bargaining agreement with the National Air 
Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) and other existing 
labor agreements. Once this determination is made, the 
Secretary is requested to make its finding available to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. The House 
proposed a prohibition on the granting of credit hours for the 
settlement of union grievances during fiscal year 2002.
      Travel policy.--The conferees do not agree with House 
direction prohibiting FAA from changing its travel policy 
regarding per diem payments for extended temporary duty 
assignments. The conferees understand that FAA has modified its 
travel policies to address findings of the DOT Inspector 
General in this area.
      Personnel reform.--The conferees direct the Administrator 
to report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, 
not later than January 15, 2002, on how the agency has 
implemented, and/or plans to implement, the Senate directive 
regarding personnel reform.
      Airspace redesign.--The conference agreement includes 
$12,500,000 for the New York/New Jersey airspace redesign, as 
proposed by the Senate, instead of $8,500,000 proposed by the 
House.
      Restoration of air traffic supervisors.--The conference 
agreement restores $5,000,000 of the proposed reductions in air 
traffic supervisor staffing included in the President's budget. 
The budget proposed a reduction of $5,400,000 due to planned 
expansion of the controller-in-charge (CIC) concept. In 
restoring these positions, the conferees agree with the 
position of the House that supervisory levels should not be 
reduced further at this time.
      National airspace system (NAS) handoff.--The conference 
agreement provides $7,600,000 in this appropriation and 
$51,006,100 in ``Facilities and equipment'' (F&E) for second 
year maintenance costs for newly commissioned equipment under 
the National airspace system (NAS) handoff program. The 
President's budget included $76,400,000 under F&E for this 
purpose. The conferees believe it is inconsistent with the 
principles of existing authorizing legislation to fund these 
costs under F&E. In all budget submissions through fiscal year 
2001, costs to operate and maintain such systems after the 
first year of operation were to transition to FAA's operating 
budget. However, due to operating budget pressures, this year 
the Administration proposed to shift the second year of such 
costs to the F&E appropriation. These are, in effect, operating 
costs transferred to a capital appropriation. While the 
conferees note that Public Law 106-181 significantly raised F&E 
funding, it did so with an understanding that those additional 
funds would be used for capital costs and not to cover 
shortfalls in a constrained operating budget. The conferees 
believe that FAA needs to live within its authorized funding 
levels for operations without program shifts of this nature.
      GPS non-precision approaches.--The conference agreement 
includes $5,000,000 to increase the number of GPS non-precision 
instrument approaches developed and published for airports that 
are not part 139 certificated, and to develop GPS routes to 
help supplement the current airway route system. These routes 
will provide important safety and other benefits to general 
aviation pilots, including increased access to currently 
inaccessible airports. In that regard, the conferees direct FAA 
to assure that the GPS instrument approaches provide the 
necessary procedural information known as LNAV/VNAV minima, to 
enable their use by pilots in obtaining guidance to the runway 
once the wide area augmentation system is in place.
      Aviation safety reporting system.--The conferees are 
aware that the NASA's aviation safety reporting system (ASRS) 
is a critical component of our aviation safety system. The 
success of ASRS lies in its ability to offer confidentiality 
and limited immunity to those who submit reports on 
unintentional violations of federal aviation regulations. The 
conferees direct the FAA to work to meet the goal of funding 
ASRS at $3,400,000 in fiscal year 2002.
      The following table compares the conference agreement to 
the levels proposed in the House and Senate bills by budget 
activity:
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                         Facilities and Equipment

                    (Airport and Airway Trust Fund)

      The conference agreement provides $2,914,000,000 for 
facilities and equipment as proposed by the House and the 
Senate. This is the level mandated by Public Law 106-181, and 
represents an increase of $257,235,000 (9.7 percent) above the 
fiscal year 2001 enacted level.
      Administration of potential shortfall due to EAS 
transfer.--Public Law 104-264 requires the FAA Administrator to 
cover any shortfall in funding for the essential air service 
program (below the mandatory amount of $50,000,000) out of any 
funds otherwise available to the Administrator. While P.L. 104-
264 authorized the collection of overflight user fees to cover 
these expenses, fee receipts have never equaled the mandatory 
appropriation level, and are not expected to do so in fiscal 
year 2002. The conferees agree that any shortfall due to 
transfer of funds to the essential air service program should 
be borne by unobligated balances from the ``Facilities and 
equipment'' appropriation, and should not be derived from 
programs, projects, or activities designated as items of 
special Congressional interest in Congressional reports or in 
the fiscal year 2002 base for reprogramming document. The 
Senate proposed up to $10,000,000 of any shortfall should be 
derived from ``Grants-in-aid for airports''.
      Capital investment plan.--The conference agreement 
includes a provision, proposed by the Senate, specifying a 
rescission of $100,000 per day for each day after initial 
submission of the fiscal year 2003 President's budget that the 
FAA's capital investment plan has not been submitted to the 
Congress. This is similar to a provision enacted for fiscal 
year 2001.
      The following table provides a breakdown of the House and 
Senate bills and the conference agreement by program:
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

      Advanced technology development and prototyping.--The 
conference agreement includes $55,991,000 for advanced 
technology development and prototyping. A comparison of the 
budget estimate to the House and Senate proposed levels and the 
conference agreement follows:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    House            Senate         Conference
                             Item                                recommended      recommended       agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Budget estimate..............................................      $36,634,000      $36,634,000      $36,634,000
Airport research.............................................       +7,547,000  ...............       +7,457,000
Concrete pavement research...................................  ...............       +2,000,000       +2,000,000
WAAS navigation..............................................  ...............       -5,700,000  ...............
ADS-B transfer...............................................  ...............       -2,800,000       -2,800,000
Juneau, AK weather research..................................       +5,000,000       +6,700,000       +6,700,000
Free flight phase 2 transfer.................................       +2,000,000  ...............  ...............
Separation standards study...................................       +1,000,000  ...............  ...............
Louisville, KY tech demo.....................................  ...............  ...............       +5,000,000
Fogeye demonstration.........................................  ...............  ...............       +1,000,000
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Total..................................................       52,181,000       36,834,000       55,991,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Concrete pavement research.--Funds provided for concrete 
pavement research are for airfield pavement improvement 
activities authorized under sections 905 and 743 of Public Law 
106-181.
      Louisville, KY technology demonstration.--The conference 
agreement includes $5,000,000 to initiate an operational 
demonstration integrating numerous advanced technologies being 
developed separately by the FAA into a single airport 
environment. Although FAA has been developing technologies 
under several programs, there has been limited testing of these 
concepts as an integrated system at individual airports. This 
demonstration will focus on the various operational impacts of 
integrating GPS-based technology, common ARTS, wake vortex 
alerting systems, and the application of improved area 
navigation procedures. Louisville International Airport is 
ideal for such a program due to its unique operating 
characteristics.
      Fogeye demonstration.--The conferees are aware of 
emerging technology, known as fogeye, which utilizes 
ultraviolet light to assist in low visibility landings and 
prevent runway incursions. The conference agreement includes 
$1,000,000 for further evaluation of this technology. In 
utilizing these funds, the FAA is encouraged to seek the full 
participation of an airline and airport sponsor to develop a 
plan for an operational demonstration of fogeye technology to 
demonstrate the effectiveness of the system at a commercial 
service airport.
      Local area augmentation system.--The conference agreement 
includes $43,109,700 for this program, $9,000,000 above the 
budget estimate, all of which is provided in budget activity 
one as proposed by the House. The conferees encourage FAA to 
consider installation of this system at Las Vegas-McCarran 
International Airport in Nevada once the systems are ready for 
production. The conferees continue to view the LAAS procurement 
as an opportunity for FAA to expedite the cost advantageous 
procurement of precision approach capability through an 
aggressive public-private cooperative acquisition strategy. The 
agreement provides the flexibility and resources to continue 
this innovative acquisition. The following milestones are 
anticipated in fiscal year 2002: (1) category I contract award 
by the fourth quarter; (2) category II/III integrity and 
continuity allocations between avionics and ground equipment 
determined; (3) finalization of the concept of operations 
required for fiscal year 2003 development of airport 
procedures; (4) integration of LAAS capabilities into a 
certifiable avionics receiver; and (5) development of a data 
collection plan and initiation of flight evaluations for 
development of complex LAAS approaches (e.g., curved, 
segmented, and offset). The FAA is directed to report quarterly 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations regarding 
the progress toward these and other LAAS milestones.
      Wide area augmentation system.--The conferees agree to 
provide total funding of $80,900,000 for further development 
and implementation of the wide area augmentation system (WAAS), 
all of which is provided in budget activity one as proposed by 
the House. The conferees do not agree to a specific amount for 
the development of WAAS standards and procedures. The 
$5,000,000 provided above the budget estimate is only for 
initial funds for geostationary satellite services, as 
recommended by FAA since initial submission of the President's 
budget. The conferees agree that acquisition of communication 
services from a third geostationary satellite are critically 
needed for the program to proceed expeditiously. The conferees 
continue to have concerns over the schedule slippages and 
certification issues that plague this program. It appears that 
the answer to each emerging challenge is a dramatically more 
expensive version of the original program, with lower 
performance criteria. The conferees believe the solution to 
WAAS certification may lie, in part, from the use of 
positioning data from other navigational or communication 
capabilities which should not be ignored by the agency. In 
addition, the FAA should not feel compelled to clear 
certification hurdles for the entire WAAS program before 
certifying individual applications for the WAAS signal. Safety 
and efficiency benefits from WAAS-based applications should be 
measured against the current national airspace system, not 
against a notional system should the entire WAAS system be 
eventually certified for use. As in past years, the conferees 
continue to urge FAA to assess the role and requirements for 
emerging communications, navigation, and surveillance 
capabilities as this troubled procurement proceeds.
      ASR-9.--The conferees do not agree with Senate direction 
to leave in place the ASR-9 radar being sited between Salt Lake 
City and Provo, Utah for the 2002 Winter Olympics until an ASR-
11 radar system is available to replace it. The conferees leave 
it to the agency's discretion to decide where this system is 
most needed after completion of the Winter Olympics.
      Aviation weather services improvements.--Of the funding 
provided for this program, the conferees agree that $3,000,000 
is to continue the collaborative effort between FAA and NOAA's 
National Severe Storms Laboratory to continue research and 
testing of phased array radar technology and to incorporate 
airport/aircraft tracking and weather information. The same 
level of funding was provided in fiscal year 2001.
      Terminal automation.--The conference agreement provides 
$96,000,000 for this program, instead of $98,500,000 proposed 
by the House and $87,500,000 proposed by the Senate. Within the 
funding provided, the conferees agree that ARTS sustainment 
activities are to be fully funded at the budget request level.
      Automated observation of visibility for cloud height and 
cloud coverage (AOVCC).--For the past two years, the conferees 
have requested FAA to implement product improvements and 
upgrades to current automated weather information programs at 
airports and report to Congress on the agency's plans to 
accelerate the deployment of upgrade technology upon successful 
demonstration of the automated observation of visibility for 
cloud height and cloud coverage (AOVCC) system. Despite this 
direction, such report has not been received. Therefore, the 
conferees direct FAA, in coordination with the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration, to complete this testing 
expeditiously and submit the previously-directed report no 
later than April 1, 2002.
      Instrument landing system establishment/upgrade.--Funding 
provided for instrument landing systems (ILS) shall be 
distributed as follows:
          Location                                                Amount
ALSF-2 acquisition and installation.....................     $11,300,000
MALSR installation......................................       5,800,000
ILS installations, JFK/LaGuardia, New York, NY..........       1,653,000
ILS/MALSR installation, Lonesome Pine, VA...............       1,000,000
Upgrade ILS to CAT III, Kinston, NC.....................       3,780,000
Acquire/install ILS, Madison County, AL.................       1,500,000
Upgrade ILS, North Bend, OR.............................       3,500,000
ILS/Localizer/glideslope/MALSR, Mena, AR................         580,000
Install ILS, Northeastern Regional, NC..................         500,000
Install ILS, Kissimmee Municipal, FL....................       1,000,000
Install ILS, Orlando International, FL..................       2,000,000
ILS/MALSR, Sanford, FL..................................         300,000
ILS/MALSR, Dekalb County, IN............................         974,000
Install ILS, runway 13/31, Mineral Wells, TX............         675,000
Install ILS, Dalles Municipal, OR.......................       1,000,000
Install ILS, runway 17, Max Westheimer, OK..............       1,534,000
ILS, Klawok Airport, AK.................................       1,000,000
ILS, Elizabethtown Airport, KY..........................         900,000
Lambert-St. Louis International, MO.....................       1,500,000
Wilmington International, NC............................       1,154,000
Edenton Northeastern Regional, NC.......................         500,000
Reno Stead Airport, NV..................................       2,000,000
Keokuk Airport, IA......................................         350,000
Rice Lake Regional, WI..................................         500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      45,000,000

      Runway visual range.--Of the $7,085,000 provided for this 
program, $85,000 is for RVR equipment at the Minneapolis-St. 
Paul International Airport in Minnesota, and $5,000,000 is for 
continued acquisition of next generation RVR systems.
      Airport movement area safety system.--The conference 
agreement does not include direction proposed by the Senate on 
this program.
      Terminal air traffic control facilities replacement.--The 
conference agreement includes $131,620,000 for replacement of 
air traffic control towers and other terminal facilities. The 
agreement distributes these funds as follows:
                                                              Conference
        Location                                               agreement
Las Vegas McCarran, NV..................................      $4,000,000
Fort Wayne International, IN............................       3,000,000
Stewart Airport, NY.....................................       6,700,000
Cleveland Hopkins, OH...................................       2,000,000
Spokane, WA.............................................       3,120,000
Reno-Tahoe, NV..........................................       6,000,000
Battle Creek, MI........................................       1,750,000
Rogers, AR..............................................         750,000
Billings, MT............................................       2,725,000
Pascagoula, MS..........................................       2,000,000
Topeka, KS..............................................       2,875,000
LaGuardia, NY...........................................       2,000,000
Boston, MA (Tracon).....................................       5,066,000
Savannah, GA............................................         500,000
Salina, KS..............................................         560,000
St. Louis, MO (Tracon)..................................       2,400,000
Corpus Christi, TX......................................         650,000
Roanoke, VA.............................................       2,140,000
Newark, NJ..............................................       1,407,000
Bedford, MA.............................................         468,000
Vero Beach, FL..........................................         592,000
Albuquerque, NM.........................................         593,000
Beaumont, TX............................................         800,000
Everett, WA.............................................       1,064,000
Louisville, KY..........................................       1,600,000
Seattle, WA.............................................       2,922,000
Richmond, VA............................................       2,500,000
Grand Canyon, AZ........................................       1,500,000
Newport News, VA........................................       1,300,000
Port Columbus, OH.......................................       1,229,000
North Las Vegas, NV.....................................         550,000
Wilmington, DE..........................................          55,000
Phoenix, AZ.............................................      26,330,000
Seattle, WA (Tracon)....................................      26,084,000
Manchester, NH..........................................       5,840,000
Reno, NV................................................       1,461,000
Chantilly, VA (Dulles)..................................         970,000
Abilene, TX.............................................       1,045,000
Ft. Lauderdale Exec, FL.................................         638,000
East St. Louis, IL......................................         572,000
Islip, NY...............................................         550,000
Oshkosh, WI.............................................         365,000
Deer Valley, AZ.........................................         805,000
Swanton, OH.............................................         824,000
Indianapolis, IN........................................         820,000
W. Palm Beach, FL.......................................         175,000
Baltimore, MD...........................................         175,000
Portland, OR (Tracon)...................................          75,000
Houston, TX (Tracon)....................................          75,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................     131,620,000

      Terminal digital radar (ASR-11).--The conference 
agreement includes $65,000,000 for continued site 
implementation and limited production of the ASR-11 radar 
system. The conferees are aware of the continued uncertainty 
over the future of this system. If funds become excess to 
requirements during the year, FAA may use this funding to 
develop interim or alternate solutions to the problem of 
providing digital radar coverage in the national airspace 
system and augmenting funds for upgrade of the ASR-9 radar 
system.
      Transponder landing systems.--The conference agreement 
includes $6,000,000 for transponder landing systems as proposed 
by the Senate instead of $3,000,000 as proposed by the House. 
The conferees agree that, once the system is certified, the 
funds made available in this and prior appropriations Acts 
should be used for both the procurement and installation of 
these systems. The conferees direct the administrator to 
rapidly conclude benefit-cost studies and site surveys at 
locations listed in the Senate report, as well as previous 
Congressional reports, with the goal of funding the procurement 
and installation of those projects with the highest justifiable 
need during fiscal year 2002. The conferees continue to support 
this program and encourage FAA to work rapidly toward 
certifying the system.
      Approach lighting system improvement program (ALSIP).--
The conference agreement provides $46,481,500 for this program, 
to be distributed as follows:
                                                              Conference
        Location                                               agreement
Items in budget request.................................      $3,114,000
MALSR installation and procurement......................      10,000,000
Lighting beacon, Powell County Airport, KY..............         150,000
Installation of MALSF, North Las Vegas, NV..............         650,000
Medium intensity runway lights, Posey Field, AL.........         100,000
Runway lighting, rural airports in Alaska...............      10,000,000
ALSF-1 and related, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN............       6,500,000
Lighting upgrades, Hartsfield Atlanta, GA...............       3,500,000
North Bend Airport, OR..................................       4,000,000
MALSR, Olive Branch Airport, MS.........................         855,000
MALSR, Stennis International, MS........................         750,000
Lighting, Rutland Airport, VT...........................       1,000,000
MALSR, Reno-Tahoe International, NV.....................       1,000,000
MALSR, Reno Stead Airport, NV...........................       1,462,500
MALSR, Niagara Falls International, NY..................       2,400,000
MALSR, Reading Airport, PA..............................         500,000
MALSR, Baton Rouge Municipal Airport, LA................         500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................     $46,481,500

      The recommendation includes elimination of the $967,000 
requested for procurement and installation of an ALSF-2 at 
Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Funds are provided 
elsewhere in this budget line for similar activities at that 
location. The conferees emphasize that the $10,000,000 in 
additional funding for MALSR systems is for installation of 
previously purchased systems and to keep the production line 
operational for future procurements.
      Explosive detection systems.--The conferees agree to 
provide $97,500,000 for the acquisition and deployment of 
explosive detection systems at airports. Consistent with the 
President's budget, the conference agreement distributes funds 
as shown below:
                                                              Conference
        Activity                                               agreement
Bulk EDS systems........................................     $38,000,000
Trace detection systems.................................      12,000,000
Threat image projection (TIP) systems...................      12,000,000
Computer-based training (CBT) systems...................       2,000,000
System integration......................................      33,500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      97,500,000

      Bulk explosive detection systems.--Given the current 
security situation and requirements in the recently enacted 
Aviation and Transportation Security Act for improved baggage 
screening, orders for bulk explosive detection systems (EDS) 
are expected to grow substantially. Section 110 of the Aviation 
and Transportation Security Act requires that systems be in 
operation to screen all checked baggage at airports in the 
United States as soon as practicable, but not later than the 
sixty days following enactment of that Act. Although this 
provision allows the use of manual or canine searches to 
supplement electronic screening as an interim measure, to 
minimize the intrusiveness and inefficiency of this procedure, 
the Act also requires the Undersecretary of Transportation for 
Security to ensure that EDS systems are deployed as soon as 
possible to ensure that airports have the equipment necessary 
to electronically screen all checked baggage no later than 
December 31, 2002. Given these requirements, it is imperative 
for the Federal Government to ensure the continued viability of 
competition for these systems, which has been a struggle over 
the past few years. Therefore, the conferees do not agree with 
direction proposed by the House, but instead direct FAA to take 
all necessary actions to maintain two certified manufacturers 
of bulk explosive detection systems within the United States. 
In addition, implementation of these systems has been plagued 
by FAA's inability to specify maintenance requirements such as 
mean time between failure and mean time to restore the system 
after a failure occurs. Without such guidance, vendors cannot 
design their systems to meet the operational needs of screening 
forces at our nation's airports. In order to address this issue 
as quickly as possible, the conferees direct FAA to develop 
specifications for reliability, maintainability, and 
availability for bulk EDS systems over the coming year and 
include them in solicitations for the further acquisition of 
these systems.
      Trace explosive detection systems.--The conferees 
understand that new non-intrusive screening technology for the 
detection of explosives carried by passengers is now ready for 
deployment after careful and thorough evaluation by the FAA. 
This commercially available technology, funded by the FAA, 
builds on existing trace detection instrument capacities 
already in use protecting airport passengers, the military, 
U.S. embassies, and commercial nuclear power plants. The 
conferees urge FAA to accelerate deployment of new non-
intrusive screening technologies to airports, to address the 
threat of explosives carriage on board commercial aircraft.
      Model guidelines for encoded data on driver's licenses.--
In light of the terrorist attacks of September 11th, it is 
clear that all levels of government need to work in concert to 
deter and prevent future attacks. One means of doing so is to 
ensure that individuals asked to identify themselves are not 
using false identities. The increasing availability through the 
internet of expertly crafted false identification makes the 
task very difficult. The conferees are aware of technology, 
existing today, that can quickly scan any encoded data on the 
reverse of a driver's license to validate the license as 
legitimately issued. By reviewing personal data encoded on the 
license, it can also be used to assist in making a quick 
determination that the person displaying the license is the 
person to whom it was issued. The conferees strongly encourage 
the department to consider the development of model guidelines 
specifying the types of encoded data that should be placed on 
driver's licenses for security purposes, and to work in concert 
with states and related licensing bodies toward the early 
implementation of such measures. This could benefit the 
nation's efforts to improve security as well as assist in 
reducing fraud and underage drinking.
      Document and biometric scanning technologies.--Document 
and biometric scanners linked to federal databases by computers 
and containing advanced authentication capabilities would 
facilitate the processing of background checks, provide 
fingerprint and additional biometric identification 
capabilities, and authenticate documents presented for 
identification. It is the conferees' understanding that such 
off the shelf, commercially available technology is in use or 
being tested by the Immigration and Naturalization Service. The 
conferees encourage FAA to assess such document and biometric 
scanning technologies for use at all commercial service 
airports. The conferees also recommend that the Secretary 
implement standards to make use of technologies that quickly 
and inexpensively assess the daily fitness-for-duty of airport 
security screeners with respect to impairment due to illegal 
drugs, sleep deprivation, legal medications, and alcohol.
      Fingerprint identification technologies.--The conferees 
are aware of the promise of forensic-quality fingerprint and 
palmprint identification technologies for the rapid 
verification of identities and employee background checks. The 
Aviation and Transportation Security Act requires the 
department to investigate the application of biometric 
technologies such as these off the shelf systems. The conferees 
encourage FAA and the Transportation Security Administration to 
evaluate these technologies for their immediate application to 
aviation security missions.
      Lambert St. Louis International Airport, MO.--In order 
for the new 9000 foot commercial runway at Lambert St. Louis 
International Airport to open as scheduled in 2005, the airport 
must have a mobile ASR-9 Radar Unit moved to St. Louis in 2002. 
FAA has previously committed to St. Louis to carry out this 
relocation. The conferees direct FAA to honor this commitment 
thereby allowing FAA sufficient time to relocate the existing 
ASR-9 radar to a new site by early 2003 in order to accommodate 
the navigational aide requirements of the new runway.

                        facilities and equipment

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

                              (rescission)

      The conference agreement rescinds $15,000,000 in 
unobligated balances from the ``Facilities and equipment'' 
appropriation. The administrator is requested to notify the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations describing the 
individual programs, projects, or activities from which this 
reduction is to be drawn before such action is finalized.

                 research, engineering, and development

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

      The conference agreement provides $195,000,000 for FAA 
research, engineering, and development instead of $191,481,000 
as proposed by the House and $195,808,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The following table shows the distribution of funds in 
the House and Senate bills and the conference agreement:
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

      System planning and resource management.--The conferees 
do not agree with Senate direction on this program. Funds for 
this activity have been provided under Office of the Secretary, 
``Transportation planning, research, and development''.
      Propulsion and fuel systems.--Of the funds provided, 
$2,000,000 is for the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium, 
$1,000,000 is for research into the use of blended aviation 
fuels containing at least 80 percent ethanol, and $400,000 is 
for the General Aviation Propulsion-Compression Ignition Test 
and Evaluation Program (GAP-CITEP), a joint FAA-NASA effort to 
evaluate alternative fuels to facilitate the transition away 
from leaded fuels for general aviation aircraft.
      Flight safety/atmospheric hazards research.--As proposed 
by the Senate, the conferees agree to provide funding for the 
joint industry-university aviation safety initiative at Roswell 
Industrial Air Center in New Mexico, and agree to Senate 
direction on this program. The conferees stipulate that the 
funding is intended for start-up costs, and that this activity 
should work to reach a self-sufficient funding level, without 
Federal support, once the activity has begun operations.
      Weather.--Of the funds provided, $4,000,000 is for wake 
turbulence research, instead of $5,000,000 proposed by the 
Senate.
      Aging aircraft.--The conference agreement provides 
$32,000,000 for this program instead of $32,111,000 as proposed 
by the House and $31,911,000 as proposed by the Senate. Of the 
funds provided, the conferees agree to the following 
allocations:
                                                              Conference
        Activity                                               agreement
National Institute for Aviation Research................      $4,200,000
Center for Aviation System Reliability..................       3,000,000
Aircraft Nondestructive Inspection Validation Center....       3,000,000
Engine Titanium Consortium..............................       3,600,000
Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence............       4,600,000

      Explosives and weapons detection.--Of the funds provided, 
$5,000,000 is only for further development of pulsed fast 
neutron analysis (PFNA) technology, as proposed by the Senate. 
The conferees note that, during fiscal year 2002, additional 
funds for activities under this heading may materialize, to be 
offset by new security user fees that are being put in place. 
The Aviation and Transportation Security Act (Public Law 107-
71) authorizes appropriation of the new user fees for research 
and development related to aviation security.
      Environment and energy.--The conference agreement 
includes $22,081,000, of which $20,000,000 is for lower noise 
aircraft technologies as proposed by the House. The conferees 
are concerned that necessary airport infrastructure cannot be 
expanded in some locations due to understandable community 
concerns over aircraft noise. Further, aircraft noise results 
in millions of federal dollars being spent each year on 
mitigation measures, diverting funds which could be applied to 
capacity enhancement or safety projects. Therefore, the 
conferees have provided $20,000,000 to speed up the 
introduction of lower noise aircraft technologies. The 
conferees expect FAA to work directly with the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration to advance aircraft engine 
noise research.

                       grants-in-aid for airports

                (liquidation of contract authorization)

                      (limitation on obligations)

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

      The conference agreement includes a liquidating cash 
appropriation of $1,800,000,000, as proposed by the House and 
the Senate.
      Obligation limitation.--The conferees agree to an 
obligation limitation of $3,300,000,000 for the ``Grants-in-aid 
for airports'' program as proposed by the House and the Senate. 
This is the amount mandated by Public Law 106-181.
      Administration.--The conference agreement includes 
funding to administer the ``Grants-in-aid for airports'' 
program under a limitation on obligations in this account, as 
proposed by the Senate, with a modified amount. The agreement 
includes a limitation of $57,050,000 instead of $64,597,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement includes 
$7,497,000 for airport-related research under ``Facilities and 
equipment''. The House bill included no funding to administer 
this program.
      Runway incursion prevention devices.--The bill includes 
language proposed by the House allowing funds under this 
limitation to be used for procurement, installation, and 
commissioning of runway incursion prevention devices, and 
systems. This continues a provision initiated in fiscal year 
2001.
      Small Community Air Service Development Pilot Program.--
The bill includes language proposed by the House authorizing 
the use of funds for section 203 of Public Law 106-181 (the 
Small Community Air Service Development Pilot Program). 
Further, the bill specifies that $20,000,000 of the funds 
limited under this program is available only for the conduct of 
this program in fiscal year 2002. The Senate bill included 
$27,000,000 for this program in a separate appropriation.
      Letters of intent.--The conference agreement includes 
funding under the limitation on obligations for the following 
existing letters of intent:
                                                        Fiscal year 2002
        State and airport                                        funding
Alaska: Anchorage International.........................       3,500,000
Arkansas: Fayetteville, NW Arkansas Regional............       7,000,000
California:
    Mammoth Lakes, Mammoth/Yosemite.....................       7,368,000
    San Jose International..............................       9,000,000
Florida:
    Fort Myers, Southwest Florida International.........       4,000,000
    Miami, Miami International..........................       2,840,000
    Orlando International...............................       5,000,000
    Orlando International...............................       2,000,000
Georgia: William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International 
    Airport.............................................      10,178,000
Illinois:
    Chicago Midway......................................       9,000,000
    Belleville, MidAmerica..............................      14,000,000
Maryland: Baltimore-Washington International............       4,748,000
Michigan: Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County.............      12,000,000
Minnesota: Minneapolis-St. Paul International...........      13,000,000
Missouri:
    Springfield-Branson Regional........................       3,300,000
    Lambert-St. Louis International.....................       7,500,000
Nebraska: Omaha, Eppley Airfield........................       2,200,000
Nevada:
    Las Vegas-Henderson Sky Harbor......................       2,000,000
    Reno/Tahoe International............................       6,000,000
New Hampshire: Manchester...............................       7,500,000
Ohio: Cleveland Hopkins International...................       5,000,000
Tennessee: Memphis, Memphis International...............       6,934,000
Texas:
    Dallas/Fort Worth International.....................       3,292,000
    Houston, George Bush Intercontinental...............       9,400,000
Utah: Salt Lake City International......................       7,000,000
Washington: Seattle-Tacoma International................      12,000,000

      High priority projects.--Of the funds covered by the 
obligation limitation in this bill, the conferees direct FAA to 
provide not less than the following funding levels, out of 
available resources, for the following projects in the 
corresponding amounts. The conferees agree that state 
apportionment funds may be construed as discretionary funds for 
the purposes of implementing this provision, consistent with 
the practice begun in fiscal year 2001. To the maximum extent 
possible, the administrator is directed to ensure that the 
airport sponsors for these projects first use available 
entitlement funds to finance these projects. The conferees note 
that, separate from the funding for high priority projects 
cited below, the FAA Administrator will have at least 
$750,000,000 in additional funds available for competitive 
discretionary grants for airport projects, new letters of 
intent, carryover grants from fiscal year 2001, and grants 
under the Small Community Air Service Development Pilot 
Program.
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

      The conferees further direct that the specific funding 
allocated above shall not diminish or prejudice the application 
of a specific airport or geographic region to receive other AIP 
discretionary grants or multiyear letters of intent.
      Alliance Airport, TX.--The Alliance facility serves as a 
major alternative hub for air cargo traffic. The conferees 
continue to voice strong support for the runway extension 
project at Alliance Airport, and encourage FAA to complete a 
letter of intent and support funding for the timely completion 
of this project.
      Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport, LA.--The FAA is 
directed to expedite the review, and act upon, the Baton Rouge 
Metropolitan Airport's application for the reconstruction of 
runway 4L/22R.

                       Grants-In-Aid for Airports

                    (Airport and Airway Trust Fund)

                 (Rescission of Contract Authorization)

      The conference agreement includes a rescission of unused 
contract authority totaling $301,720,000. These funds are above 
the annual obligation ceiling for fiscal year 2002, and remain 
unavailable to the program. The conference agreement also 
deletes an appropriation of $720,000, proposed by the House 
under this heading, for ``Office of the secretary, salaries and 
expenses''. The conference agreement includes funding for this 
office under the Office of the Secretary.

                   Aviation Insurance Revolving Fund

      The conference agreement retains language authorizing 
expenditures and investments from the Aviation Insurance 
Revolving Fund for aviation insurance activities, as proposed 
by the Senate. The House had proposed to relocate this language 
to title III of the bill (general provisions). This provision 
has been carried in appropriations Acts for many years.

                Small Community Air Service Development

      The conference agreement deletes the appropriation of 
$20,000,000 for this program proposed by the Senate. The 
conferees agree that this is a worthy program, as authorized by 
Public Law 106-181. Funding of $20,000,000 has been provided 
for this program under the ``Grants-in-aid for airports'' 
program.

                     Federal Highway Administration

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

      The conference agreement limits administrative expenses 
of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to $311,000,000, 
instead of $311,837,000 as proposed by the House and 
$316,521,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement provides that certain sums be 
made available under section 104(a)(1)(A) of title 23, U.S.C. 
to carry out specified activities as follows: $7,500,000 shall 
be available for child passenger protection education grants as 
authorized under section 2003(b) of Public Law 105-178, as 
amended; $4,000,000 shall be available for motor carrier safety 
research; $841,000 shall be available for motor carrier crash 
data improvement program; $1,500,000 shall be available for 
environmental streamlining; and $6,000,000 shall be available 
for the nationwide differential global positioning system.
      The conferees recommend the following adjustments to the 
budget request by program and activity of the funding provided 
for FHWA's administrative expenses:

Department of Defense trade collections data............     -$1,616,000
Equipment (information technology)......................      -2,529,000
Five new innovative finance positions...................        -500,000
Undistributed reduction in administrative expenses......      -2,048,000

      FHWA streamlining.--The conferees direct the Federal 
Highway Administration (FHWA) to provide the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations a report, not later than January 
2, 2002, summarizing FHWA's streamlining efforts. The report 
should include specific examples of FHWA activities that help 
streamline the environmental process.
      Incidental Appurtenances For Recreational Vehicles.--The 
conferees encourage the FHWA Administrator to include in its 
final rule regarding exclusion of devices from commercial 
vehicle length and width requirements, an allowance for the 
commercial transport of recreational vehicles with incidental 
appurtenances (retractable awnings).
      Performance based outcomes.--The conferees recognize the 
impact the performance based outcomes can have on the road 
building industry by allowing contractors the freedom and 
flexibility to focus on quality and long term performance and 
encourage the Department of Transportation to further explore 
their use.

                          FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS

      The conference agreement limits obligations for the 
federal-aid highways program to $31,799,104,000 instead of 
$31,716,797,000 as proposed by the House and $31,919,103,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Rural consultation in planning process.--The conferees 
direct the FHWA to submit a letter to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations, no later than February 1, 2002, 
describing actions the administration has taken to ensure that 
transportation officials from rural areas are being consulted 
in the long-range transportation planning process.
      I-90 Steering Committee.--The conferees direct the FHWA 
to continue working with the I-90 Steering Committee in 
Washington State to advance the R-8A alternative through the 
environmental review process.
      Work zone safety.--The conferees are concerned that each 
year over 700 people are killed in work zones throughout our 
nation. The conferees are aware that the Federal Highway 
Administration has collaborated with the Texas transportation 
institute (TTI) to establish the national work zone safety 
information clearinghouse. The clearinghouse serves as a 
valuable resource in the development and distribution of work 
zone safety materials for state and local agencies. The 
conferees are aware that TTI has proposed a work zone safety 
research program that seeks to improve data collection in an 
effort to better manage the dangers of roadway work zones. The 
conferees encourage the Federal Highway Administration to 
evaluate TTI's proposals and consider requesting funding in 
future budget submissions.
      Environmental streamlining pilot projects.--The conferees 
direct the Secretary of Transportation to give priority 
consideration to funding for Washington State's environmental 
permit streamlining program using funds provided for 
environmental streamlining initiatives under this Act. The 
conferees expect the regional administrators of the Federal 
Highway Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, 
the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to serve on 
the Washington State transportation permit efficiency and 
accountability committee as non-voting members. The Secretary 
shall issue a report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, the Senate Committee of Environment and Public 
Works, and the House Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure by April 1, 2002, on the status of this pilot 
program. The Conferees further direct the Secretary to give 
priority consideration to additional projects, such as the one 
in Orange County, California.

                     SURFACE TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH

      Within the funds provided for surface transportation 
research, the conference agreement includes $101,000,000 for 
highway research and development for the following activities:

Environmental, planning, real estate....................     $16,042,500
Research and technology program support.................       8,135,000
International research..................................         500,000
Structures..............................................      13,449,500
Safety..................................................      15,619,000
Operations and asset management.........................       9,891,000
Pavements research......................................      13,753,000
Long term pavement project (LTPP).......................      10,000,000
Advanced research.......................................       2,640,000
Policy research.........................................       8,330,000
Other (field services, delivery, strategic planning)....       2,640,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
Subtotal................................................    $101,000,000
Long-term pavement performance research project and 
    superpave program (additional funds from revenue 
    aligned budget authority)...........................      10,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................     111,000,000

      Environmental, planning, and real estate.--The conference 
agreement provides $16,042,500 for environmental, planning, and 
real estate research. Within the funds provided for this 
research activity, the FHWA is encouraged to provide $1,000,000 
for the completion of the dust and persistent particulate 
abatement demonstration study at Kotzebue, Alaska; and no less 
than $1,250,000 for environmental streamlining activities.
      Research and technology.--The conference agreement 
provides $8,135,000 for research and technology program 
support. Within the funds provided for this activity, the FHWA 
is encouraged to provide up to $600,000 for the Center on 
Coastal Transportation Engineering Research at the University 
of South Alabama.
      Structures.--The conference agreement provides 
$13,449,500 for structures research. Within the funds provided 
for structures research, the conferees encourage the FHWA to 
provide: $1,250,000 for research into composite structure and 
related engineering research at West Virginia University's 
Constructed Facilities Center; $500,000 to conduct non-
corrosive anti-icing projects in the Chicago region; $1,500,000 
for research conducted at the Transportation Research Center at 
Washington State University, including non destructive 
evaluation of bridges to determine load capacities, impacts of 
earthquake mitigation on elevated highway structures and the 
development of advanced composite material for bridges; and 
$400,000 for electromagnetic interrogation of structures 
project at the University of Vermont to develop wireless 
methods of assessing structural integrity.
      Safety.--The conference agreement provides $15,619,000 
for safety research. Within the funds provided for this 
activity, the conferees encourage FHWA to provide: $300,000 to 
continue the research into the effectiveness of Freezefree 
anti-icing systems; and $1,000,000 to the National 
Transportation Research Center in Tennessee to conduct broad 
based laboratory-to-roadside research into heavy vehicle safety 
issues. These funds will also allow FHWA to expedite the State 
DOT testing on the interactive highway safety design model 
(IHSDM) to explore the safety implications of alternative 
designs.
      Operations and asset management.--The conference 
agreement provides $9,891,000 for operations and asset 
management. Within the funds provided for this activity, the 
conferees encourage FHWA to provide $1,000,000 to South 
Carolina State University for the Southern Rural Transportation 
Center.
      Pavements.--The conference agreement provides $13,753,000 
for pavements research. Within the funds provided for this 
activity, the conferees encourage FHWA to provide: $750,000 for 
a continuation of the alkali silica reactivity research with 
lithium based technologies to mitigate alkali silica reactivity 
to prevent highway pavement cracking; $500,000 to the Center 
for Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Technology at Iowa State; 
and $750,000 to support the Institute for Aggregate Research at 
Michigan Technical University.
      Policy.--The conference agreement provides $8,330,000 for 
policy research. Within the funds provided for this activity, 
FHWA shall provide $2,000,000 to the Academy for Community 
Transportation Innovation for transportation research on 
integrating public involvement, technology, and environmental 
issues in the transportation planning process.
      Long term pavement performance research project and 
SUPERPAVE program.--The conferees recognize the importance of 
technology development and deployment of research and 
technology products funded through the federal-aid highways 
program. The conferees have included an additional $10,000,000 
in revenue aligned budget authority to be utilized in 
conjunction with the administration's planned funds to carry 
out the long term pavement performance research project and to 
assure the implementation of the SUPERPAVE program.

                    INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

      The conference agreement includes a total of $225,000,000 
for intelligent transportation systems. Of the total, 
$105,000,000 is for intelligent transportation systems (ITS) 
research and development, as provided by both the House and 
Senate, for the following activities:

Research and development................................     $48,680,000
Operational tests.......................................      12,930,000
Evaluations.............................................       7,750,000
Architecture and standards..............................      15,290,000
Integrations............................................      11,350,000
Program support.........................................       9,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
        Total...........................................     105,000,000

      Research.--The conference agreement provides $48,680,000 
for research and development. Within the funds provided for 
this activity, the conferees encourage FHWA to provide 
$6,800,000 for commercial vehicle research.
      Intelligent transportation systems deployment projects.--
Within the funds available for intelligent transportation 
systems deployment, the conference agreement provides that not 
less than the following sums shall be available for intelligent 
transportation projects in these specified area

                    Project name and Conference total

Alameda-Contra Costa, California........................        $500,000
Alaska statewide........................................       2,500,000
Alexandria, Virginia....................................         750,000
Arizona statewide EMS...................................         500,000
Army trail road traffic signal coordination project, 
    Illinois............................................         300,000
Atlanta smart corridors, Georgia........................       1,000,000
Austin, Texas...........................................         125,000
Automated Crash Notification System, UAB, Alabama.......       2,500,000
Bay County Area wide traffic signal system, Florida.....         500,000
Beaver County transit mobility manager, Pennsylvania....         800,000
Brownsville, Texas......................................         250,000
Carbondale technology transfer center, Pennsylvania.....       1,000,000
Cargo mate logistics and intermodal management, New York       1,250,000
Central Ohio............................................       1,500,000
Chattanooga, Tennessee..................................       2,000,000
Chinatown intermodal transportation center, California..       1,750,000
Clark County, Washington................................       1,000,000
Commercial vehicle information systems and networks, New 
    York................................................         450,000
Dayton, Ohio............................................       1,250,000
Detroit, Michigan (airport).............................       1,500,000
Durham, Wake Counties, North Carolina...................         500,000
Eastern Kentucky rural highway information..............       2,000,000
Fargo, North Dakota.....................................       1,000,000
Forsyth, Guilford Counties, North Carolina..............       1,000,000
Genesee County, Michigan................................       1,000,000
Great Lakes, Michigan...................................       1,500,000
Guidestar, Minnesota....................................       6,000,000
Harrison County, Mississippi............................         500,000
Hawaii statewide........................................       1,000,000
Hoosier SAFE-T, Indiana.................................       2,000,000
Houma, Louisiana........................................       1,000,000
I-90 connector testbed, New York........................       1,000,000
Illinois statewide......................................       2,000,000
Inglewood, California...................................         500,000
Integrated transportation management system, Delaware 
    statewide...........................................       2,000,000
Iowa Statewide..........................................         562,000
Jackson Metropolitan, Mississippi.......................         500,000
James Madison University, Virginia......................       1,500,000
Kansas City, Kansas.....................................         500,000
Kittitas County workzone traffic safety system, 
    Washington..........................................         450,000
Lansing, Michigan.......................................         750,000
Las Vegas, Nevada.......................................       1,450,000
Lexington, Kentucky.....................................         750,000
Libertyville traffic management center, Illinois........         760,000
Long Island rail road grade crossing deployment, New 
    York................................................       1,000,000
Macomb, Michigan (border crossing)......................       1,000,000
Maine statewide (rural).................................         500,000
Maryland statewide......................................       1,000,000
Miami-Dade, Florida.....................................       1,000,000
Monterey-Salinas, California............................         750,000
Montgomery County ECC & TMC, Maryland...................       1,000,000
Moscow, Idaho...........................................       1,000,000
Nebraska statewide......................................       4,000,000
New York statewide information exchange systems, New 
    York................................................         500,000
New York, New Jersey, Connecticut (TRANSCOM)............       2,500,000
North Greenbush, New York...............................       1,000,000
Oklahoma statewide......................................       3,000,000
Oxford, Mississippi.....................................         500,000
Pennsylvania statewide (turnpike).......................         500,000
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania..............................       1,033,000
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Drexel).....................       1,500,000
Pioneer Valley, Massachusetts...........................       1,500,000
Port of Long Beach, California..........................         500,000
Port of Tacoma trucker congestion notification system, 
    Washington..........................................         200,000
Roadside animal detection test-bed, Montana.............         500,000
Rochester-Genesse, New York.............................         800,000
Rutland, Vermont........................................         750,000
Sacramento, California..................................       3,000,000
San Diego joint transportation operations center, 
    California..........................................       1,500,000
San Francisco central control communications, California         250,000
Santa Anita, California.................................         300,000
Santa Teresa, New Mexico................................         750,000
Shreveport, Louisiana...................................         750,000
Silicon Valley transportation management center, 
    California..........................................         700,000
South Carolina DOT......................................       3,000,000
Southeast Corridor, Colorado............................       7,000,000
Southern Nevada (bus)...................................       1,100,000
Spillway road incident management system, Mississippi...         600,000
St. Louis, Missouri.....................................       1,000,000
Statewide transportation operations center, Kentucky....       2,000,000
Superior, I-39 corridor, Wisconsin......................       2,500,000
Texas statewide.........................................       2,000,000
Travel network, South Dakota............................       2,325,000
University of Arizona ATLAS Center, Arizona.............         500,000
Utah Statewide..........................................         560,000
Vermont statewide (rural)...............................       1,500,000
Washington statewide....................................       4,500,000
Washington, D.C. metropolitan region....................       2,000,000
Wayne County road information management system, 
    Michigan............................................       1,500,000
Wichita, Kansas.........................................       1,200,000
Wisconsin communications network........................         310,000
Wisconsin statewide.....................................       1,000,000
Yakima County adverse weather operations, Washington....         475,000

      Illinois Statewide ITS.--Within the amount made available 
for Illinois Statewide ITS, funds shall be made available to 
the City of Quincy for the 18th St. Bridge and to the City of 
Carbondale for the Southern Illinois University-Carbondale's 
Materials Technology Center.
      Projects selected for funding shall contribute to the 
integration and interoperability of intelligent transportation 
systems, consistent with the criteria set forth in TEA21.

               ferry boats and ferry terminal facilities

      Within the funds available for ferry boats and ferry 
terminal facilities, funds are to be available for the 
following projects and activities:

                    Project name and Conference total

Bainbridge-Seattle ferry system, dolphin replacement project, 
    Washington................................................$4,000,000
Battery Maritime building, New York...........................   750,000
Baylink Ferry intermodal center and upgrades and improvements 
    to facilities (City of Vallejo), California............... 2,000,000
Cherry Grove ferry dock, New York.............................    90,000
City of Brewer waterfront redevelopment shoreline 
    stabilization, Maine...................................... 1,000,000
City of Palatka, Florida......................................   300,000
City of Rochester harbor & ferry terminal improvement 
    projects, New York........................................ 4,500,000
Cleveland Trans-Erie ferry, Ohio..............................   800,000
Coffman Cove-Wrangell/Mitkof Island ferries and facilities, 
    Alaska....................................................10,000,000
Corpus Christi ferry landings, Texas..........................   200,000
Holland Street pier Ferry Boat terminal building dock 
    construction, Erie, Pennsylvania.......................... 1,000,000
Fire Island terminal infrastructure, New York.................   200,000
Fishers Island ferry district, Connecticut.................... 1,500,000
Hatteras Inlet ferry connecting Ocracoke Island and North 
    Carolina Outer Banks, North Carolina...................... 1,450,000
Haverstraw-Ossining-Yonkers ferry service terminals, New York. 2,500,000
Jamaica Bay transportation hub, New York......................   200,000
Jersey City Pier redevelopment & terminal construction project 
    (also bus), New Jersey.................................... 2,000,000
Key West ferry terminal, Florida..............................   300,000
Kings Point ferry, Warren County, Mississippi.................   500,000
New Bedford Massachusetts ferry and ferry facility project, 
    Massachusetts............................................. 1,450,000
North Carolina State ferry (dredging and environmental 
    studies), North Carolina..................................   689,000
Oak Harbor Municipal Pier terminal, Washington................   200,000
Plaquemines Parish ferry, Louisiana........................... 1,200,000
San Francisco Bay Area Water Transit Authority Fuel Cell 
    project...................................................   100,000
Sand Point dock, Rhode Island.................................   250,000
Sandy Hook ferry terminal, New Jersey......................... 1,000,000
Savannah water ferry, Georgia................................. 1,000,000
St. George Ferry terminal, New York...........................   500,000
St. Johns River ferry terminal, Florida....................... 1,000,000
Station Square River landing boat docks, Pennsylvania......... 1,000,000
Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority Marina ferry, Ohio.........   500,000
Treasure Island ferry service, California.....................   800,000
Whitehall terminal, New York..................................   600,000

           national corridor planning and development program

      Within the funds available for the national corridor 
planning and development program, funds are to be available for 
the following projects and activities:

                    Project name and Conference total

Alameda Corridor-East construction project, California..      $4,000,000
Ambassador Bridge Gateway, Michigan.....................       9,000,000
Arch Road/Sperry Road Corridor Widening, California.....       2,000,000
Arizona 95 to I-40 Connector, California................       3,000,000
Bristol/First Street intersection Santa Ana, California.       1,000,000
Byram-Clinton/Norrell Corridor, Mississippi.............       3,500,000
Chesapeake Bypass, Lawrence, Ohio.......................       4,000,000
Clay/Leslie Industrial Park access, Kentucky............       4,000,000
Coalfields Expressway, West Virginia....................      16,000,000
Continental 1, Pennsylvania and New York................       1,000,000
Curry Pike multilaning project, Indiana.................       1,000,000
Des Moines metro I-235 Reconstruction, Iowa.............         700,000
Dixie Highway Flyover Bridge, Florida...................       1,500,000
East-West Highway, Maine................................       3,500,000
Essen Lane & I-12 Interchange, Louisiana................       1,000,000
Everett Development 41st Street overpass project, 
    Washington..........................................       1,500,000
Exit 6 of I-95, Pennsylvania............................         350,000
Falls to the Falls Corridor, Cook, Minnesota............       7,000,000
FAST Corridor project, Washington.......................      20,000,000
FM 1016 from US 83 to Madero, Texas.....................         500,000
Foothills Parkway TN-1, Tennessee.......................       1,000,000
Freeport Business Center off ramp, Texas................         500,000
Gravina Bridge, Alaska..................................       1,000,000
Heartland Parkway/Highway 55, Kentucky..................         500,000
Hendricks county North-South Corridor, Indiana..........         750,000
Highway 92 in McCreary County, Kentucky.................       1,600,000
Highway 20 Freeport bypass review, design and 
    engineering, Illinois...............................       1,000,000
Highway 231 Glover Carey Bridge and Owensboro 
    intersection, Kentucky..............................       1,000,000
Highway 61, Avenue of the Saints interchange, Moscow 
    Mills, Missouri.....................................       2,500,000
Highway 61, Green County between Greensburg and 
    Columbia, Kentucky..................................         250,000
Highway 71 Texarkana South, Arkansas....................       7,000,000
Hoosier Heartland Industrial Corridor Lafayette to 
    Logansport, Indiana.................................       1,000,000
Hwy 92 Whitley County, Kentucky.........................         300,000
I-29 construction from Exit 81 North to South of I-90 at 
    Sioux Falls, South Dakota...........................      12,000,000
I-35 expansion, Hill County, Texas......................       2,000,000
I-35 Replacement Bridge, Dallas County, Texas...........       1,000,000
I-4 Crosstown Expressway Connector, Florida.............       1,000,000
I-44/US 65 Interchange, Missouri........................       1,500,000
I-49 Interchange at Caddo Port Road, Louisiana..........       3,800,000
I-49 south from Lafayette east to Westbank, Louisiana...      15,000,000
I-5 trade corridor, Oregon..............................       5,000,000
I-5/SR56 connectors, California.........................       2,000,000
I-66, Kentucky..........................................      20,000,000
I-66, Pike County, Kentucky.............................       2,500,000
I-69 Connector from I-530 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.......       4,000,000
I-69 construction Odom Road to I-55, Mississippi........       9,000,000
I-69 Corridor, Louisiana................................      10,000,000
I-69 Corridors 18 and 20, Texas.........................       1,500,000
I-69 Evansville to Indianapolis, Indiana................       2,586,000
I-69 on SIU 11 along US 61, Mississippi.................         500,000
I-84 Exit 6/Route 37 interchange, Connecticut...........       2,300,000
I-85 extension to I-59/20, Alabama......................       3,000,000
I-87 Corridor Study, New York...........................       2,000,000
I-90/94 new by-pass to Highway 3 EIS, Montana...........       3,500,000
I-905 Otay Mesa Border port-of-entry, California........       7,500,000
Interstate 75 and Central Sarasota Parkway interchange, 
    Florida.............................................       1,000,000
King Coal Highway, West Virginia........................      20,000,000
KY 1848 from I-64 to US 60, Kentucky....................         320,000
La Entrada al Pacifico feasibility study, Texas.........         200,000
Lincoln Bypass, California..............................       2,000,000
Memphis-Huntsville-Atlanta Highway preliminary 
    engineering and construction, Alabama...............       1,000,000
Midland Reliever Route for freeway connection from SH 
    349 to I-20, Texas..................................       1,000,000
Missouri Highway 7, Blue Springs, Missouri..............       3,750,000
Monticello Street underpass, Kentucky...................       1,000,000
MS Highway 44/Pearl River Bridge extension project, 
    Mississippi.........................................       3,000,000
New Boston Road (a segment of National Great River 
    Road), Illinois.....................................       1,000,000
New York Harbor rail freight tunnel, New York...........       5,000,000
North/South transitway, Charlotte/Mecklenburg, North 
    Carolina............................................       3,500,000
Northern Border Cascadia program of projects, Washington       2,500,000
North-South Highway project, Alabama....................       1,000,000
Outer Belt Connector, Kendall & Kane Counties, Illinois.      15,000,000
Pennyrile Parkway, Kentucky.............................       1,000,000
Phoenix Avenue improvements and airport access 
    construction, Arkansas..............................       1,750,000
Port of Claiborne/Grand Gulf Connector Access Road, 
    Mississippi.........................................       8,000,000
Port of South Louisiana to I-10 Connector, Louisiana....       1,000,000
Ports-to-Plains Corridor development management plan, 
    Texas...............................................       1,700,000
Railroad Avenue Underpass East Chicago, Indiana.........       2,500,000
Rapid River Bridge, Idaho...............................       1,000,000
Reconstruct MD 117 at MD 124 in Montgomery County, 
    Maryland............................................       1,000,000
Route 10, West Virginia.................................      15,000,000
Route 116 between Ashfield and Conway, Massachusetts....       2,500,000
Route 2 bypass & safety improvements in Erving, 
    Massachusetts.......................................       3,000,000
Route 340/522 bridge replacement, Virginia..............         100,000
Route 669 bridge widening, Virginia.....................         500,000
Route 71 McDonald County, Missouri......................       6,000,000
Seward Highway safety improvements at Bird Creek, Alaska      15,000,000
SR 149 Relocation, Ohio.................................         500,000
SR-67 between I-110 & US-49, Mississippi................       9,000,000
St. Rt. 905 phase I, California.........................       1,000,000
State border safety inspection facilities, Texas........      12,000,000
Stewart Airport connector study, New York...............         350,000
STH 29 between I-94 and CTH J, Wisconsin................      10,000,000
Stone Coal Road in Johnson County, Kentucky.............       1,500,000
Tuscaloosa eastern bypass from I-59 to Rice Mine Road, 
    Alabama.............................................      20,000,000
U.S. 24 Corridor improvement study between Toledo, Ohio 
    and Indiana.........................................       2,500,000
U.S. Highway 212 Hennepin County, Minnesota.............       3,000,000
U.S. Highway 54, Kansas.................................       4,000,000
Upgrade road to I-64/US Route 35, West Virginia.........       3,000,000
US 19, Florida..........................................      25,000,000
US 231/I-10 freeway Connector from Dothan to AL/FL state 
    line, Alabama.......................................       1,000,000
US 25 N to Renfro Valley, Kentucky......................       2,000,000
US 27 from Somerset to KY70, Kentucky...................       5,000,000
US 27 to Burnside, Kentucky.............................         800,000
US 278, Alabama.........................................       1,000,000
US 395 North Spokane Corridor, Washington...............       6,000,000
US 412 Overpass at I-44, Oklahoma.......................       1,500,000
US 431 from Epleys Station North to Lewisburg, Kentucky.         850,000
US 60 Butler County, Missouri...........................       1,500,000
US 60 right-of-way, KY 425 to US 41, Henderson County, 
    Kentucky............................................         500,000
US Route 15 expansion from Pennsylvania to Presho, New 
    York................................................       3,000,000
US Route 30 in North Huntingdon Township, Pennsylvania..         200,000
US-151 expansion Dickeyville & Dodgeville, Wisconsin....       3,000,000
US 19/US 129/SR 11 Connector, Georgia...................       1,000,000
US-2 planning & construction, New Hampshire.............       1,000,000
US-41A, Kentucky........................................         100,000
US-49/I-55 flyover, Mississippi.........................       1,500,000
US-63 improvements for Corridor 39, Arkansas............      15,000,000
US-64/87 Ports to Plains corridor study, New Mexico.....       1,000,000
US-95 improvements from milepost 522 to Canadian border, 
    Idaho...............................................       9,000,000
USH 10 between Stevens Point & Waupaca, Wisconsin.......       4,000,000
Weidle Road Improvements, Illinois......................         500,000
Wichita South Area transportation study, Kansas.........       1,000,000
Yakima grade separation program of projects, Washington.       4,000,000

      TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNITY AND SYSTEM PRESERVATION PROGRAM

      Within the funds made available for the transportation 
and community and system preservation program, funds are to be 
distributed to the following projects and activities:

                    Project name and Conference total

Access improvement to Rostraver Industrial Park, 
    Pennsylvania........................................        $500,000
Advanced traffic analysis center, North Dakota..........         500,000
Alkali Creek bike/pedestrian trail, Montana.............         500,000
Alliance transportation congestion mitigation, Ohio.....       2,000,000
Artesia Boulevard Rehabilitation, California............         200,000
Atlantic Avenue Extension, Queens, New York.............       2,000,000
Atlantic Avenue Trail Extension, Virginia...............         800,000
Austin TX Bicycle Commuting Project, Texas..............         375,000
Bandyville Road, Illinois...............................         525,000
Bicycle/Pedestrian connections to Charlotte's trail 
    systems, North Carolina.............................         200,000
Boston-North Shore corridor study, Massachusetts........         250,000
Broadway Armory Parking Facility, Illinois..............         750,000
Bronx River Greenway, New York..........................         750,000
Brooklyn Bridge Park Development Corporation Study, New 
    York................................................       1,000,000
Buffalo City inner harbor and waterfront development, 
    New York............................................       1,570,000
Cabarrus Avenue Gateway, North Carolina.................       2,800,000
Cades Cove Loop and Laurel Springs Road improvements, 
    Tennessee...........................................       2,000,000
Casper Second Street extension, Wyoming.................       1,000,000
Cedar Rapids Edgewood Road project, Iowa................       3,000,000
Central business district trail link Prairie Duneland 
    and Iron Horse Heritage, Indiana....................         970,000
Charles Town streetscape improvements and welcome 
    center, West Virginia...............................         400,000
Chester waterfront development streetscape, Pennsylvania         500,000
Church Street Marketplace in Burlington, Vermont........       1,500,000
City of Elk Point bike/pedestrian trail system, South 
    Dakota..............................................         200,000
City of Frisco, Texas...................................       1,000,000
City of Havana, Illinois................................       1,500,000
City of Tea bike/pedestrian path, South Dakota..........          50,000
City of Woburn, Massachusetts...........................         200,000
Claymont transportation project, Delaware...............         100,000
Columbia Harden Street improvements, South Carolina.....       5,000,000
Completion of US 101 Regional Bikeway System, California         500,000
Concord 20/20 vision program, New Hampshire.............         500,000
Cross County Corridor study, Missouri...................         500,000
Crowley Historic Parkerson Avenue redevelopment, 
    Louisiana...........................................         500,000
Cullman County pedestrian walkway, Alabama..............         100,000
Derby, traffic congestion, Connecticut..................       2,000,000
Downeast Heritage Center project, Calais, Maine.........         400,000
Downtown Development District, Louisiana................         500,000
Dynamic Rollover Laboratory, Auburn University project, 
    Alabama.............................................       1,500,000
East Branch DuPage River Greenway Trail Plan, Illinois..          75,000
East Chicago Railroad Avenue Project, Indiana...........       1,000,000
East Haddam Mobility Improvements, Connecticut..........         500,000
Eastern Market pedestrian overpass park, Michigan.......         500,000
Eastern shore trail project from USS Alabama to Weeks 
    Bay National Reserve, Alabama.......................       1,500,000
Elimination of grade crossing and redirection of 
    corridor traffic, Ashland, Wisconsin................       1,900,000
Estill County bypass lighting around Irvine, Kentucky...          50,000
Estill County industrial park access road, Kentucky.....         300,000
Everett development project track replacement, 
    Washington..........................................       3,700,000
Fairhope Trax & Trails, Alabama.........................       1,000,000
Farrington safety enhancements, Hawaii..................       2,000,000
Fegenbush Lane Bridge at Fern Creek, Kentucky...........         400,000
FM 49 widening from US 83 to FM 1016, Texas.............       1,000,000
Foxhall Road Safety Reconstruction Project, DC..........       2,000,000
Fruitvale, California...................................       2,000,000
Galesburg Railroad Relocation Study, Illinois...........         150,000
Goucher Wheel and Walk Way, Pennsylvania................       1,000,000
Grand Forks greenway trail system, North Dakota.........       1,000,000
Great Dismal Swamp Corridor Master Plan, Virginia.......         180,000
Great Lake recreation area traffic study, Oklahoma......         250,000
Green Airport Initiative, California....................       2,000,000
Green Island, New York Road and infrastructure project..       2,600,000
GSB-88 Emulsified binder treatment research, Alabama....       1,000,000
Gulf Coast Pedestrian Walkover, Highway 98, Florida.....       1,000,000
Hanceville Downtown Revitalization, Alabama.............         400,000
Harris County 911 emergency network, Texas..............         500,000
HART bus tracking, Florida..............................       1,000,000
Henderson downtown street widening, North Carolina......       1,000,000
Henderson riverfront project, Kentucky..................       1,000,000
Highway 2 feasibility project, Montana..................       1,000,000
Highway 24 segment completion, Texas....................       1,000,000
Highway 45, Lowndes County, Mississippi.................       2,000,000
Highway 61 from KY487 to Columbia PE/design, Kentucky...       1,000,000
Highway 71 Alma to Mena, Arkansas.......................       1,000,000
Hillsborough weigh station, North Carolina..............         350,000
Historic Erie Canal Aqueduct redevelopment, New York....       1,100,000
Hopewell Borough Street flooding project, New Jersey....         300,000
Houston Main Street corridor master plan, Texas.........         500,000
Huffman Prairie Flying Field pedestrian & multimodal 
    gateway entrance, Ohio..............................       1,500,000
I-15, Sevier River to Mills reconstruction, Utah........       2,000,000
I-5/SR 432 Interchange Access, Washington...............       1,000,000
I-74 Mississippi River Bridge...........................       2,000,000
Injury Control Research Center, UAB project, Alabama....       1,250,000
Interchange at 159th St. and I-35, Olathe, Kansas.......       2,000,000
Intersection improvements, Highway 41 and US 17, North 
    of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina...................         500,000
Interstate Route 295 and Commercial Street project, 
    Portland, Maine.....................................       1,200,000
Isleta Boulevard Reconstruction Project, New Mexico.....       5,000,000
Johnstown Road, Kentucky................................         800,000
Jonesboro Caraway Overpass project, Arkansas............       1,500,000
Kalispell Bypass Project, Kalispell, Montana............         400,000
Kenai River Trail, Alaska...............................         500,000
Kentucky Transportation Cabinet for Regional Trail 
    Improvements, Kentucky..............................       2,350,000
Lake Street access to I-35 West, Minnesota..............       4,000,000
Lambertville Street flooding improvements, New Jersey...         300,000
Lancaster Avenue improvements, Fort Worth, Texas........       1,500,000
Land Use Municipal Resource Center, New Jersey..........       2,000,000
Lees Town Road project, Kentucky........................         500,000
Lewis Avenue Bridge, California.........................         200,000
Lincoln Antelope Valley 16th Street overpass, Nebraska..       1,600,000
Littleton integrated and networked community, New 
    Hampshire...........................................         750,000
Littleton Main Street pedestrian improvements, New 
    Hampshire...........................................       2,000,000
Lodi project, improvements to route 46, New Jersey......       1,000,000
Los Angeles County bike path, California................       1,000,000
Louisville Bypass, Nebraska.............................       1,000,000
Louisville Waterfront/River Road pedestrian islands 
    improvement and park entry Preston Street project, 
    Kentucky............................................       1,000,000
Macon community preservation and redevelopment, Georgia.         200,000
Madison State Street project, Wisconsin.................       1,000,000
Main Street Streetscaping, Jacksonville, Florida........         500,000
Maine Avenue Redesign, California.......................         100,000
Mamaroneck pedestrian improvements, New York............         125,000
Manalapan Township Woodward Road reconstruction, New 
    Jersey..............................................         250,000
Marin Parklands Visitor Access, California..............       1,000,000
Maryland Route 404 upgrade project......................       3,000,000
Marysville Road, Montana................................       1,000,000
Marysville streetscape improvements, Tennessee..........       4,000,000
McKinley/Riverside Avenue Safety Improvements, Indiana..       1,245,000
Median on US 42 from Harrods Creek to River Road, 
    Kentucky............................................         600,000
Metrolina traffic management center, North Carolina.....       1,000,000
Metrowest Community Transportation Pilot Project, 
    Massachusetts.......................................         450,000
Miami-Dade FL multi-modal public transportation transfer 
    center..............................................       3,500,000
Midwest City downtown revitalization project, Oklahoma..       1,000,000
Missouri Highway 21.....................................       7,000,000
Mobile Greenways, Alabama...............................       1,750,000
Mobile Waterfront Terminal and Maritime Center of the 
    Gulf Project, Alabama...............................       5,000,000
Mount Vernon, NY commuter rail station improvements, New 
    York................................................       1,000,000
Museum campus trolleys expanded service, Illinois.......         500,000
Mystic streetscape projects, Connecticut................       1,000,000
National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Ohio......       3,000,000
Navajo Gateway, Oklahoma................................         200,000
New Rochelle NY North Avenue pedestrian street 
    improvements, New York..............................       1,000,000
NFTA Development Plan, New York.........................         100,000
Oceanport Road flooding improvements, New Jersey........         300,000
Ohio & Erie Canal Corridor, Ohio........................       1,000,000
Olympic Discovery Trail, Washington.....................       1,600,000
Ortega Street Pedestrian overcrossing gateway, 
    California..........................................         125,000
Owensboro Riverfront redevelopment project, Kentucky....       1,800,000
Palmer railroad right-of-way, Alaska....................       1,100,000
Park City sidewalks, Kentucky...........................          42,600
Parkerson Avenue Pedestrian and Streetscape 
    Improvements, Louisiana.............................         165,000
Parking Facility, Marysville, Tennessee.................       1,650,000
Payette River Greenway project, Idaho...................         105,000
Peachtree Corridor project, Georgia.....................       6,000,000
Phalen Boulevard, Minnesota.............................       1,750,000
Pharr bridge toll connector, Texas......................         415,000
Pioneer Valley Commission, West Springfield, 
    Massachusetts.......................................         400,000
Pistol Creek pedestrian bridge, Tennessee...............         900,000
Port of Vicksburg Study, Mississippi....................         400,000
Portage Canal Rehabilitation & Pedestrian/Bicycle 
    Facility, Wisconsin.................................       1,000,000
Prattville-Daniel Pratt Historic District development, 
    Alabama.............................................         500,000
Queens Boulevard Pedestrian Improvements, New York......         500,000
Raritan Township Clover Hill Road Reconstruction, New 
    Jersey..............................................       1,000,000
Redlands Transportation & Community Preservation, 
    California..........................................         500,000
Rhinelander Relocation, Oneida County, Wisconsin........       9,600,000
River Street reconstruction, Lindenhurst, New York......         500,000
Riverwinds project in West Deptford, New Jersey.........         500,000
Road 200 South Improvement Project, Indiana.............         700,000
Roadway expansion, East Metropolitan Business Park, 
    Mississippi.........................................       2,000,000
Robbins Commuter Rail Station upgrade, Illinois.........         250,000
Rose Bowl access mitigation, California.................         300,000
Rose Crossing in Kingston and Roane Counties, Tennessee 
    (roadways, trails and improvements).................       1,050,000
Route 101 corridor study for Amherst, Milford, and 
    Wilton, New Hampshire...............................         200,000
Route 17 Paramus and Essex Street, Hackensack, 
    congestion alleviation, New Jersey..................         300,000
Route 22/Mill Road pedestrian street improvements, New 
    York................................................         750,000
Route 3 upgrade PE between Franklina and Boscawen, New 
    Hampshire...........................................         100,000
Route 710 Connector Improvements and Traffic Calming, 
    Riviera Beach, Florida..............................         300,000
Route 79 relocation and harbor enhancements, 
    Massachusetts.......................................       1,000,000
Saddle Road improvement project, Hawaii.................       4,000,000
Santa Carita Cross Valley Connector, California.........       1,000,000
Satsop Development Park, Washington.....................       1,500,000
SC 277 Pedestrian Walkway, South Carolina...............       1,000,000
Schuylkill Valley Metro Feasibility Study, Pennsylvania.         500,000
SH 121/Grandview Ave. Railroad Grade Separation, 
    Colorado............................................         250,000
Shore Road, Lindenhurst, New York.......................         500,000
Somerset downtown revitalization, Kentucky..............       2,000,000
South 7th Street, Lindenhurst, New York.................         250,000
South Amboy Regional Intermodal Transportation 
    Initiative, New Jersey..............................       1,000,000
South Capitol Gateway & Improvement Study, Maryland and 
    the District of Columbia............................         500,000
South Carolina Route 38/I-95 Interchange improvements, 
    South Carolina......................................       1,500,000
South Com regional dispatch trauma center, Illinois.....         170,000
South LaBrea Avenue and Imperial Highway Improvements, 
    California..........................................       1,000,000
Southern bypass around the southwestern portion of 
    Somerset, Kentucky..................................       6,600,000
Southern Rural Transportation Center, South Carolina....       9,000,000
Springfield center city streetscape improvements, 
    Missouri............................................       1,000,000
Springfield Metro/VRE Pedestrian Access improvements, 
    Virginia............................................         500,000
SR-520 Convening with communities, Washington...........       1,000,000
SR91 Freeway Corridor Transportation Enhancement, 
    California..........................................         500,000
St. Landry Road extension in Ascension Parish and I-10 
    link study, Louisiana...............................         500,000
Stamford Waterside, Connecticut.........................         250,000
State Route 25 Safety Improvements, California..........       2,000,000
State Route 46 expansion study, Florida.................       1,200,000
Stearns Road corridor, multi-use Trails, Illinois.......       1,000,000
Stockton Miracle Mile/Pacific Avenue resurfacing, 
    California..........................................       1,000,000
Strong Avenue improvements and rail location, Vermont...       1,500,000
Stuttgart Two-Lane Bypass, Arkansas.....................         750,000
Sunland Park Drive extension, Texas.....................         500,000
Sutherland, NE viaduct to UP tracks and US Highway 30, 
    Nebraska............................................       2,000,000
Syracuse lakefront project, New York....................       1,500,000
Temple Street reopening project, Connecticut............       1,000,000
Tioughnioga waterfront development, New York............         500,000
Titan Road improvement project, Colorado................       2,000,000
Tompkins County strategic initiative, New York..........         130,000
Traffic Calming Program, Jackson, Mississippi...........       2,000,000
Transportation Research Institute, University of Alabama       7,000,000
Trunk Highway 610/10 interchange at I-94, Minnesota.....       1,600,000
Tukwila transit oriented development at Long Acres, 
    Washington..........................................       1,500,000
Tulare County Farm-to-Market Roads, California..........       2,500,000
Tuscaloosa City riverwalk and parkway development, 
    Alabama.............................................       1,000,000
U.S. 51 widening, Illinois..............................       1.500,000
U.S. 98 highway lighting, Daphne, Alabama...............       2,000,000
University of South Florida, University of Central 
    Florida I-4 Corridor project........................       1,750,000
US 17-92/Horatio Ave. Intersection Traffic Mitigation, 
    Florida.............................................       1,000,000
Vine Grove sidewalks, Kentucky..........................         125,000
Walerga Road Bridge Replacement, California.............       1,000,000
Warren Sidewalk Reconstruction, Rhode Island............       1,000,000
Waterford National Historic District, Virginia..........       1,000,000
West Windsor Township bicycle path, New Jersey..........         200,000
White Lake Road, Michigan...............................       1,000,000
Wichita Riverwalk on Arkansas River, Kansas.............         600,000
Widen highways 159, 269, 379, Florida...................         750,000
Winooski, Vermont streetscape project...................       1,500,000
Wyandanch traffic signals, sidewalks and improvements, 
    New York............................................         400,000
Ybor City Streetcar Intermodal Station, Florida.........       2,000,000

      Montana Highway 2.--The conference agreement includes 
$1,000,000 for Montana Highway 2. These funds may be used only 
for feasibility studies, the preparation of an EIS, or 
preliminary engineering and design activities. None of these 
funds may be spent for any purpose along those sections of 
Highway 2 that are either contiguous with or are in the general 
vicinity of Glacier National Park.
      South Capitol Gateway.--The Secretary, in cooperation 
with the District of Columbia Department of Planning, the 
District of Columbia National Capitol Revitalization 
Commission, and the Department of Interior and in consultation 
with the National Capital Planning Commission and other 
interested parties, shall conduct a study of methods to make 
improvements to promote commercial, recreational and 
residential activities and to improve pedestrian and vehicular 
access on South Capitol Street and the Frederick Douglass 
Bridge between Independence Avenue and the Suitland Parkway, 
and on New Jersey Avenue between Independence Avenue and M 
Street Southeast. Not later than September 20, 2003, the 
Secretary shall transmit to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations a report containing the results of the study 
with an assessment of the impacts (including environmental, 
aesthetic, economic, and historical impacts) associated with 
the implementation of each of the methods examined under the 
study.

                      BRIDGE DISCRETIONARY PROGRAM

      Within the funds available for the bridge discretionary 
program, funds are to be available for the following projects 
and activities:

                    Project name and Conference total

145th Street Bridge over Harlem River, New York.........      $5,800,000
A. Max Brewer Causeway Bridge, Florida..................       3,000,000
Atlantic Bridge, California.............................         300,000
Avis overhead bridge WV107, West Virginia...............       6,000,000
Cooper River Bridge, South Carolina.....................       7,000,000
Covered bridges Sec. 1224 of TEA-21.....................       3,000,000
Cross Road Bridge, Connecticut..........................       3,500,000
Deck replacement & rehab of Rt 9 Edison Bridge, New 
    Jersey..............................................       2,000,000
Ford Bridge, Minnesota..................................       7,000,000
Gerald Desmond Bridge Replacement, California...........       4,000,000
Golden Gate Bridge seismic retrofit program, California.       2,000,000
Great River Bridge, Arkansas............................       7,500,000
Hoan Bridge rehabilitation, Wisconsin...................       7,500,000
Hood Canal Bridge replacement, Washington...............       5,000,000
I-195 Washington Bridge, Rhode Island...................       4,000,000
I-84 over Delaware River Twin Bridges, New York.........       2,000,000
Iowa/Nebraska Missouri River Bridge, Iowa...............       1,500,000
James Rumsey Bridge (Shepherdstown Bridge), West 
    Virginia............................................      11,000,000
Kerner Bridge, Louisiana................................       1,000,000
Leeville Bridge, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana............       3,000,000
Leon River Bridge, Texas................................       1,500,000
Longfellow Bridge, Cambridge, Massachusetts.............       1,500,000
Martin Luther King Jr. Bridge rehabilitation, Ohio......       1,500,000
Metro Parks Zoo historic bridge replacement, Ohio.......       1,250,000
Missisquoi Bay Bridge, Vermont..........................       4,000,000
Missouri River Bridge approach from Route 74, Missouri..       1,000,000
Padanaram Bridge, Dartmouth, Massachusetts..............       1,500,000
Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge, Connecticut...............       5,000,000
Pennsylvania Avenue Bridge, Michigan....................       3,300,000
Route 1 & 9/Production Way to east Lincoln Avenue, New 
    Jersey..............................................       3,000,000
Route 13 Bridge, Missouri...............................       1,500,000
Route 17 over Wallkill River, New York..................       1,800,000
Sand Island Bridge resurfacing, Hawaii..................       5,000,000
South Park Bridge, Washington...........................       1,000,000
SR 240 Yakima Bridge Replacement, Washington............       4,500,000
TEA-21 Bridge Setaside for Seismic Retrofit.............      25,000,000
Topeka boulevard Bridge, Kansas.........................       2,000,000
US 81 Missouri River Bridge PE, South Dakota............       1,000,000
Wacker Drive discretionary bridge reconstruction, 
    Illinois............................................       6,000,000
Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge replacement, Maine......       5,000,000

                              FEDERAL LANDS

      Within the funds available for the federal lands program, 
funds are to be available for the following projects and 
activities:

                    Project name and Conference total

14th Street Bridge interim capacity and safety 
    improvements, Virginia..............................     $11,000,000
Acadia National Park trails and road projects, Maine....         500,000
Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge and parking, 
    Alaska..............................................         850,000
Amistad National Recreation Area Box Canyon Ramp Road, 
    Texas...............................................       4,500,000
Arches National Park Main Entrance Relocation, Utah.....       1,000,000
Bear River migratory bird refuge access road, Utah......         250,000
Belardo Bridge, California..............................       3,000,000
Blackstone River bikeway, Rhode Island..................       1,500,000
Blueberry Lake road improvements, Green Mountain 
    National Forest, Vermont............................         500,000
Broughton Bridge over USACOE Miliford Lake, Kansas......       1,500,000
Chincoteague Wildlife Refuge access roads, Virginia.....       1,000,000
City of Rocks Back Country, Idaho.......................       2,000,000
Clark Fork River Bridge replacement, Idaho..............       2,500,000
Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge, Kentucky.........       2,000,000
Cold Hill Road, Kentucky................................       1,400,000
Complete design for CN3480, TPM-00401, New Mexico.......         150,000
Craigs Creek Road, Kentucky.............................         995,000
Daniel Boone Parkway between mileposts 37 and 44, 
    Kentucky............................................       1,500,000
Death Valley Road reconstruction, California............       2,000,000
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, New Jersey.       1,000,000
Diamond Bar Road, Arizona...............................       3,000,000
Forkland Park access road improvements, Alabama.........         475,000
Fort Peck Lake public access road, Montana..............         500,000
Giant Springs Road, Great Falls, Montana................       1,200,000
Glade Creek Road and Brooklyn Road, New River Gorge 
    National River, West Virginia.......................       3,500,000
Herbert H. Bateman Education & Administrative Center, 
    Virginia............................................         500,000
Highway 26 between Zigzag and Rhododendron, Oregon 
    (Highway 26, Oregon)................................       1,750,000
Hoover Dam bypass, Arizona..............................       8,000,000
Ivy Mountain Road, Texas................................       1,000,000
Lewis & Clark Trail, State Spur 26E, Nebraska...........         325,000
Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Roadway project, North 
    Dakota..............................................       1,000,000
Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center access road, Montana       1,200,000
Little River Canyon National Reserve Road Improvements, 
    Alabama.............................................         350,000
Lowell National Historical Park riverwalk design, 
    Massachusetts.......................................         563,000
Marshall County #10 & BIA #15 through Sica Hollow State 
    Park, South Dakota..................................         400,000
Mat-Su Borough/Wasilla, Alaska..........................         500,000
Metlakatla/Walden Point Road, Alaska....................       2,000,000
Miller Creek Road preliminary design and EIA, Montana...       5,000,000
New access to Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site, 
    Colorado............................................         500,000
New Bedford Whaling National Historic Park sign project, 
    Massachusetts.......................................         400,000
New highway from North Dakota Borders to Idaho, Montana.       1,000,000
Noxubee River Bridge replacement and access route, 
    Mississippi.........................................       1,000,000
Pala Road improvement Project, California...............       4,000,000
Preliminary and final design to CN2357, FLH-666-11, New 
    Mexico..............................................       1,000,000
Presidio Trust, California..............................       1,000,000
Ramport Road, Alaska....................................         500,000
Reconstruction of NM 537: CN2070, FLH-0537, New Mexico..       1,000,000
Route 113 Heritage Corridor, Pennsylvania...............         170,000
Route 4 Jemez Pueblo Bypass, New Mexico.................       1,000,000
Route 600 road restructuring, Virginia..................         750,000
S-323 Alzada-Ekalaka, Montana...........................       2,000,000
Sand Point Road improvement, Alaska.....................       1,500,000
Saratoga Monument Access, New York......................         280,000
SD-63 Corson County reconstruction, South Dakota........       4,000,000
SH-149 Rio Grande National Forest, Colorado.............       3,700,000
Shotgun Cove Road, Alaska...............................         650,000
SR 146 St. Rose Parkway & 1-15 Interchange, Nevada......       4,000,000
SR 16 from Loop Road to SR 15, Neshoba County, 
    Mississippi.........................................       7,400,000
State Route 153, Beaver to Junction, Utah...............       1,000,000
Statewide improvements, Hawaii..........................       6,000,000
Timucuan Preserve bike route, Florida...................       1,000,000
Trail extension at Mount Vernon Circle, Fairfax, 
    Virginia............................................         100,000
US 3 and Acadia National Park road improvement, Maine...         500,000
US-30 Morrison/Whiteside County expansion, Illinois.....         750,000
USA-95 Laughlin cut-off to railroad pass widening, 
    Nevada..............................................       8,000,000
USMC Heritage Center Access Improvements, Virginia......         800,000
Wind Cave National Park highway resurfacing, South 
    Dakota..............................................       1,250,000
Wood River Road upgrades, Alaska........................         800,000
Woonsocket Depot rehabilitation, Rhode Island...........         650,000
Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers, and Fort Union Trading 
    Post bike trail, North Dakota.......................         400,000

      The conferees direct that the funds allocated above be 
derived from the FHWA's public lands discretionary program, and 
not from funds allocated to the Fish and Wildlife Service's and 
National Park Service's regions.

                  interstate maintenance discretionary

      Within the funds available for the interstate maintenance 
discretionary program, funds are to be available for the 
following projects and activities:

                    Project name and Conference total

Brent Spence Bridge replacement I-75 and I-71, Kentucky.      $2,000,000
City of Renton/Port Quendall project, Washington........       1,000,000
Cleveland inner belt, Ohio..............................         500,000
I-10 Irvington interchange, Alabama.....................         800,000
I-10 Katy Freeway, Houston, Texas.......................       7,000,000
I-10 Riverside Avenue interchange, California...........         500,000
I-12 Interchange at LA 1088, Louisiana..................       1,500,000
I-12/Northshore Blvd. Interchange, Louisiana............       2,000,000
I-15 Interchange at MP 10, Utah.........................       1,000,000
I-15 reconstruction, Utah...............................       5,000,000
I-180 Lycoming Mall Road interchange, Pennsylvania......       2,000,000
I-195 Washington Bridge, Rhode Island...................       1,000,000
I-215 Southern Beltway to Henderson, Nevada.............         500,000
I-25 Broadway and Alameda interchanges, Colorado........       5,000,000
I-25 North of Raton, New Mexico.........................       1,500,000
I-295 connector, Commercial Street, Maine...............         500,000
I-295 reconstruction, Rhode Island......................       3,000,000
I-35 East/I-635 interchange, Texas......................       5,400,000
I-35 West/US 287 interchange, Texas.....................       4,000,000
I-40 Arizona state line east to milepost 30, New Mexico.       5,000,000
I-40 crosstown expressway realignment, Oklahoma.........       5,500,000
I-44 Fenton industrial corridor improvements in St. 
    Louis County, Missouri..............................       4,000,000
I-44 relocation and improvements, Phelps County, 
    Missouri............................................       4,000,000
I-470 reconstruction and removal of bridges, Missouri...       7,000,000
I-49 southern extension from I-10, Louisiana............       1,000,000
I-5 Corridor arteries, California.......................       1,000,000
I-5 HOV/general purpose lanes, California...............       4,000,000
I-5 Medford interchange, Oregon.........................       1,000,000
I-65 and Valley Dale Road interchanges, Alabama.........       8,000,000
I-70 improvements from CBD to northside, Missouri.......       5,000,000
I-70/I-75 interchange construction, Ohio................       1,000,000
I-70/MD85/MD355 intersection reconstruction, Maryland...       8,000,000
I-75 Exit 11, Kentucky..................................         375,000
I-79 Bridgeport to Meadowbrook Road, Harrison County, 
    West Virginia.......................................      10,000,000
I-79 Connector, West Virginia...........................       4,800,000
I-79/SR 910 interchange, Pennsylvania...................         250,000
I-79/Warrendale Technology Park interchange, 
    Pennsylvania........................................       1,750,000
I-80 Exit at Stoney Hollow Road, Pennsylvania...........       3,000,000
I-80 widening and reconstruction in Johnson County, 
    Iowa,...............................................       6,000,000
I-81 South Martinsburg I/C Bridge, Berkeley County, West 
    Virginia............................................       7,000,000
I-84 flyover access, Connecticut........................       1,500,000
I-85 in Mecklenburg and Cabarrus Counties, North 
    Carolina............................................       3,000,000
I-85 widening completion from Orange County, North 
    Carolina............................................       2,000,000
I-90 two-way transit operations, Washington.............       1,000,000
I-95 Northern Maine.....................................       4,500,000
I-96 Latson Road interchange, Michigan..................       3,500,000
IH 610 Bridge, Texas....................................       1,500,000
Louisville-Southern Indiana Ohio River Bridges project, 
    Indiana and Kentucky................................       2,500,000
Montana/Wyoming joint port-of-entry facility, Montana...       1,000,000
Pearl River Bridge-I-55 Connector, Mississippi..........       8,900,000
Port Everglades-Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood airport return 
    loop, Florida.......................................       2,500,000
State Route 0039 & I-81 interchange, Pennsylvania.......         750,000
Tippecanoe/I-10 Interchange, California.................       2,500,000
US 167/I-20 interchange, Louisiana......................       1,000,000
Woodall Rogers extension bridge, Texas..................       8,000,000

                             scenic byways

      Within the funds available for the scenic byways program, 
funds are to be available for the following projects and 
activities:

                    Project name and Conference total

Alabama Scenic Byways...................................        $750,000
Connecticut River scenic farm byway, Massachusetts......         500,000
Great River Road Scenic Byways Learning Center in 
    Prescott, Wisconsin.................................         500,000
High Street revitalization project, economic development 
    and historic preservation, Lawrenceberg, Indiana....         375,000
Kentucky Scenic byways (Country Music Highway, 
    Wilderness Road Heritage Highway, Cumberland 
    Cultural Heritage Highway)..........................         885,000
Lewis & Clark Northwest Passage Scenic Byway, Idaho.....       2,000,000
Mobile Bay Causeway, Alabama............................         250,000
Program of projects, Washington.........................         750,000
Route 29 scenic byway improvements between I-295 to 
    Frenchtown Borough line, New Jersey.................       1,000,000
Route 66 scenic byway livable communities and 
    transportation plan, New Mexico.....................         200,000
Seward Highway Millennium Trail improvements, Alaska....         350,000
The Cape and islands rural roads initiative (Route 6A), 
    Massachusetts.......................................         500,000
Warren County scenic byway, New York....................          30,000

                          FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement provides a liquidating cash 
appropriation of $30,000,000,000 for the federal-aid highways 
program as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                 APPALACHIAN DEVELOPMENT HIGHWAY SYSTEM

      The conference agreement provides $200,000,000 for the 
Appalachian Development Highway System (ADHS) instead of 
$350,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The House bill 
contained no similar appropriation. $100,000,000 shall be 
allocated in accordance with the system's most recent cost-to-
complete study and the remaining $100,000,000 shall be 
allocated as follows: $30,000,000 for Kentucky Corridors; 
$10,000,000 for Mississippi Corridor V; $10,000,000 for 
Tennessee Corridor S; $30,000,000 for West Virginia Corridor D; 
and $20,000,000 for Alabama Corridor X.

                       STATE INFRASTRUCTURE BANKS

                              (Rescission)

      The conference agreement includes a rescission of 
$5,750,000 of funds provided for state infrastructure banks 
that is not allocated to a specific state in fiscal year 1997 
under Public Law 104-205 as proposed by the Senate instead of a 
rescission of $6,000,000 as proposed by the House.

 estimated fiscal year 2002 Distribution of obligational authority \1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ Distributions include Special Limitation for Minimum Guarantee, 
the Appalachian Development Highway System, and High Priority Projects 
(HPP).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
      The following table shows the actual distribution of 
highway funds apportioned to the States for fiscal year 2001; 
and the estimated distribution of highway funds apportioned to 
the States in the President's budget request and the fiscal 
year 2002 conference agreement:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        State                           FY 2001 actual    President's budget      Conference
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alabama.............................................         525,987,662         559,304,950         560,430,831
Alaska..............................................         299,602,164         319,539,358         319,540,065
Arizona.............................................         444,257,391         484,638,247         485,392,037
Arkansas............................................         345,831,473         364,825,284         365,616,483
California..........................................       2,361,371,050       2,529,726,702       2,535,814,783
Colorado............................................         307,159,912         355,738,430         356,571,570
Connecticut.........................................         389,148,164         413,309,266         413,939,498
Delaware............................................         112,968,544         122,080,490         122,338,437
Dist. of Col........................................         104,349,222         109,709,145         110,052,561
Florida.............................................       1,232,852,228       1,285,679,130       1,287,447,472
Georgia.............................................         916,707,662         985,563,148         987,127,223
Hawaii..............................................         135,311,383         141,835,573         142,143,566
Idaho...............................................         202,470,958         210,483,999         210,894,491
Illinois............................................         880,214,981         929,028,708         931,425,218
Indiana.............................................         635,845,273         643,457,830         644,611,374
Iowa................................................         315,909,296         331,491,613         332,403,649
Kansas..............................................         305,293,124         323,427,894         324,346,857
Kentucky............................................         471,971,981         482,107,642         483,093,023
Louisiana...........................................         419,888,462         439,655,410         440,733,363
Maine...............................................         139,051,114         146,462,881         146,809,418
Maryland............................................         416,996,303         452,525,374         453,570,096
Massachusetts.......................................         485,116,197         515,922,488         517,214,719
Michigan............................................         845,460,584         891,594,244         893,370,463
Minnesota...........................................         389,970,111         411,417,650         412,466,274
Mississippi.........................................         311,481,806         357,474,846         358,284,438
Missouri............................................         625,559,105         650,273,494         651,908,448
Montana.............................................         251,108,362         271,250,377         271,592,640
Nebraska............................................         199,788,549         215,383,872         215,960,513
Nevada..............................................         186,938,046         198,387,281         198,741,203
New Hampshire.......................................         136,096,426         142,020,763         142,342,289
New Jersey..........................................         702,211,553         721,541,680         723,390,343
New Mexico..........................................         252,516,241         270,550,894         271,099,283
New York............................................       1,340,983,556       1,414,039,356       1,417,346,965
North Carolina......................................         737,064,069         773,791,494         775,124,344
North Dakota........................................         168,977,282         180,759,857         181,163,035
Ohio................................................         892,059,208         965,196,101         967,365,570
Oklahoma............................................         390,759,395         426,474,240         427,612,076
Oregon..............................................         322,479,138         339,777,033         340,684,607
Pennsylvania........................................       1,331,487,491       1,386,021,505       1,389,343,461
Rhode Island........................................         154,758,492         164,800,244         165,144,826
South Carolina......................................         437,032,280         464,164,383         464,965,557
South Dakota........................................         189,546,127         200,274,630         200,732,567
Tennessee...........................................         594,521,880         633,958,835         635,243,821
Texas...............................................       1,958,075,662       2,139,081,121       2,142,744,035
Utah................................................         205,736,805         215,660,062         216,239,371
Vermont.............................................         117,285,537         126,204,048         126,500,031
Virginia............................................         671,761,845         722,046,984         723,407,902
Washington..........................................         469,879,755         491,587,996         492,910,328
West Virginia.......................................         296,372,617         310,802,143         311,418,326
Wisconsin...........................................         513,262,795         543,767,539         544,732,900
Wyoming.............................................         178,559,537         192,949,775         193,412,432
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal......................................      26,320,038,798      27,967,766,009      28,026,764,782
Allocated Programs \1\..............................       3,276,137,054       3,595,390,991       3,772,339,218
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
      Total.........................................      29,596,175,852      31,563,157,000      31,799,104,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Includes High Priority Projects in the Territories and the portion of RABA going to HPP.

              Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

                          motor carrier safety

                 limitation on administrative expenses

                    (including rescission of funds)

      The conference agreement includes $110,000,000 for 
administrative expenses of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration instead of $92,307,000 as proposed by the House 
and $105,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the 
$110,000,000 provided, the conferees allocate the following 
amounts:

Personnel and administration............................    $100,341,000
Commercial drivers license program......................       5,000,000
Hotline.................................................         375,000
Reviews of conditional motor carriers...................       1,000,000
Crash data collection...................................       3,284,000

      The conference agreement includes $400,000 to study 
fatigue management techniques and $100,000 for the deployment 
of a nation-wide share the road safely program, as outlined in 
the Senate report.
      Highway watch program.--Within the amount provided for 
motor carrier research, the conferees direct not less than 
$500,000 be made available to analyze, evaluate, and expand the 
highway watch program.
      Bill language is included that rescinds $6,665,342 in 
unavailable contract authority associated with administrative 
balances, as proposed by the Senate. The House bill proposed no 
similar rescission.

                 NATIONAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY PROGRAM

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement provides a liquidating cash 
appropriation of $205,896,000 for the national motor carrier 
safety program as proposed by the House instead of $204,837,000 
as proposed by the Senate.

                 NATIONAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY PROGRAM

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement includes a limitation on 
obligations of $205,896,000 for motor carrier safety grants. 
This is consistent with the President's budget request. Of this 
total, $23,896,000 is derived from revenue aligned budget 
authority. Of this amount $18,000,000 is reserved for Arizona, 
California, New Mexico, and Texas to hire border truck safety 
inspectors and $5,896,000 is reserved for the commercial 
drivers license program.
      Hazardous materials motor carriers.--The conferees 
understand that since September 11th FMCSA is giving top 
priority to visits to all 34,000 hazardous materials motor 
carriers to ensure that these carriers are aware of the 
security measures that should be in place. FMCSA had conducted 
about half of these visits through the end of November, 2001. 
The conferees direct the FMCSA to give top priority to 
continuing such visits and to monitoring these carriers after 
all visits have been completed. A truck carrying hazardous 
materials can be used as a weapon and FMCSA and the carriers 
should take every action to prevent this from happening; no 
activity should be a higher priority to the FMCSA. The 
conferees direct the FMCSA to report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by January 31, 2002 on the status 
of the visits, what FMCSA found during the visits and what 
further actions are planned by FMCSA.

             National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

                        Operations and Research

      The conference agreement provides $127,780,000 from the 
general fund for highway and traffic safety activities instead 
of $122,420,000 as proposed by the House and $132,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      A total of $95,835,000 shall remain available until 
September 30, 2004 instead of $90,430,000 as proposed by the 
House and $96,360,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Bill language is included that rescinds $1,516,000 in 
unobligated balances authorized under 23 U.S.C. 403 as proposed 
by the Senate. The House bill contained no similar rescission.
      The agreement includes a provision carried since fiscal 
year 1996 that prohibits NHTSA from obligating or expending 
funds to plan, finalize, or implement any rulemakings that 
would add requirements pertaining to tire grading standards 
that are not related to safety performance. This provision was 
contained in both the House and Senate bills.

                        Operations and Research

                (Liquidation of Contract Authorization)

                       (Limitation on Obligation)

                          (Highway Trust Fund)

            (Including Rescission of Contract Authorization)

      The conference agreement provides $72,000,000 from the 
highway trust fund to carry out provisions of 23 U.S.C. 403 as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      The following table summarizes the conference agreement 
for operations and research (general fund and highway trust 
fund combined) by budget activity:

Salaries and benefits...................................     $61,451,000
Travel..................................................       1,297,000
Operating expenses......................................      23,113,000
Contract programs:
    Safety performance..................................       7,891,000
    Safety assurance....................................      15,064,000
    Highway safety programs.............................      46,133,000
    Research and analysis...............................      57,338,000
    General administration..............................         643,000
Grant administration reimbursements.....................     -11,150,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................    $201,780,000

      Salaries and benefits.--A total of $61,451,000 is 
provided for salaries and benefits. This level will support an 
FTP level of 709, including 15 new FTPs (7.5 FTEs) to assist in 
regulatory issues as proposed by the Senate. The House approved 
an FTP level of 664.
      Operating expenses.--Within the $23,113,000 provided for 
operating expenses, the conferees direct that funding for 
computer support should continue at the fiscal year 2001 level. 
The conferees believe that this level of funding is adequate, 
and urge NHTSA to adopt a more cost-effective approach to 
managing computer support expenses.
      Executive bonuses.--The conferees reduce funding within 
the salaries and benefits account for executive bonuses because 
performance goals are not being met (-$20,000).
      Safety performance.--The conference agreement provides 
$7,891,000 for safety performance, $550,000 above the budget 
request as proposed by the Senate. The additional funding 
should be used to expedite key motor vehicle safety standards 
including TREAD activities and several other backlogged 
regulatory items. NHTSA is directed to submit a notification 
letter to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations if 
there is a reasonable likelihood that the agency will not meet 
any deadlines specified in the TREAD Act. In addition, NHTSA 
shall submit a strategic implementation plan to both the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations with the submission of 
the fiscal year 2003 budget that specifies timetables, 
milestones, and the research necessary to implement each 
provision of TREAD, as well as the amounts provided to these 
activities in fiscal years 2001 and 2002.
      National occupant protection program.--The conference 
agreement provides $2,000,000 above the budget request to 
bolster the national occupant protection program. Of these 
additional funds, $1,000,000 shall be targeted at high-risk 
groups, such as minorities, younger drivers, and the occasional 
seat belt user to increase seat belt usage; and $1,000,000 
shall be used to increase local efforts to boost seat belt 
usage rates in their jurisdictions.
      The conferees remain disappointed that NHTSA has been 
unable to raise seat belt usage to the Presidential directive 
of 85 percent by 2000 and direct the agency to refocus its 
program on achieving meaningful results. As part of this 
effort, NHTSA shall provide a report to the House and Senate 
Committee on Appropriations describing its plans to accelerate 
progress in raising seat belt use. This report is due by 
February 1, 2002.
      Within the funds provided, NHTSA shall contract with the 
National Academy of Sciences to conduct a study on the benefits 
and acceptability of technologies that may enhance seat belt 
usage in passenger vehicles, as well as any legislative or 
regulatory actions that may be necessary to enable installation 
of devices, as proposed by the House.
      Older driver research.--The conferees support NHTSA's 
efforts to promote the safe mobility of older Americans. As the 
agency analyzes ways to rehabilitate older Americans who have 
suffered strokes or other medical conditions to resume some or 
all of their driving, the conferees encourage NHTSA to closely 
examine the potential of occupational therapy as an appropriate 
intervention to improve safety for older drivers.
      Impaired driving.--The conference agreement provides 
$2,500,000 above the budget request to help states and 
communities decrease the number of impaired driving offenders, 
including repeat offenders and those with high blood alcohol 
content. Up to half of these funds may be awarded to states and 
communities that want to implement promising new strategies.
      Emergency medical services head injury research.--A total 
of $2,245,000 has been provided for emergency medical services. 
Of this amount, $750,000 shall be used to continue training 
emergency medical service personnel in delivering prehospital 
care to patients with traumatic brain injuries.
      Biomechanics.--Within the funds provided for 
biomechanical research, $1,250,000 shall be used to continue 
research related to traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries 
caused by motor vehicle, motorcycle, and bicycle accidents at 
the Injury Control Research Center and other centers of the 
Southern Consortium for Injury Biomechanics.
      Brake lining friction.--Within the funds provided for 
research and analysis, $300,000 shall be used for research into 
brake lining friction, as proposed by the Senate.

                        National Driver Register

                          (Highway Trust Fund)

      The conference agreement provides $2,000,000 for the 
National Driver Register as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate.

                     Highway Traffic Safety Grants

                (Liquidation of Contract Authorization)

                          (Highway Trust Fund)

      The conference agreement provides $223,000,000 to 
liquidate contract authorizations for highway traffic safety 
grants, as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                     highway traffic safety grants

                       (limitation on obligation)

                          (Highway Trust Fund)

      The conference agreement limits obligations for highway 
traffic safety grants to $223,000,000 as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate. The bill includes separate obligation 
limitations with the following funding allocations:

State and community grants..............................    $160,000,000
Occupant protection incentive grants....................      15,000,000
Alcohol incentive grants................................      38,000,000
State highway data improvement grants...................      10,000,000

      A total of $11,150,000 has been provided for 
administration of the grant programs as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate. Of this total, not more than $8,000,000 
of the funds made available for section 402; not more than 
$750,000 of the funds made available for section 405; not more 
than $1,900,000 of the funds made available for section 410; 
and not more than $500,000 of the funds made available for 
section 411 shall be available to NHTSA for administering 
highway safety grants under chapter 4 of title 23. This 
language is necessary to ensure that each grant program does 
not contribute more than five percent of the total 
administrative costs.
      The conference agreement retains bill language, proposed 
by both the House and Senate, that limits technical assistance 
to states from section 410 to $500,000.
      The conference agreement prohibits the use of funds for 
construction, rehabilitation or remodeling costs, or for office 
furnishings and fixtures for state, local, or private buildings 
or structures, as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                    Federal Railroad Administration

                         Safety and Operations

      The conference agreement provides $110,857,000 for safety 
and operations instead of $110,461,000 as proposed by the House 
and $111,357,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within this total, 
the conferees have funded 26 new positions and provided 
$350,000 for the Operation Respond Center in Mississippi. The 
conferees have decreased funding for technical studies and 
assessments by $500,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement includes language that permits 
$6,509,000 of the total funding to remain available until 
expended instead of $6,159,000 as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate.
      The conference agreement deletes language, contained in 
the Senate bill, that authorizes the Secretary to receive 
payments from the Union Station Redevelopment Corporation, 
credit them to the first deed of trust, and make payments on 
the first deed of trust. This language is no longer necessary, 
as the deed will be paid in full in 2001.
      Railroad freight congestion.--The conferees are aware of 
significant delays currently affecting railroad freight in and 
around Chicago, Illinois. It is not uncommon for freight trains 
in and around Chicago, Illinois to take 72 hours or more to 
move cargo through the metropolitan area. The conferees direct 
the Administrator, in cooperation with the Surface 
Transportation Board, to prepare a comprehensive analysis of 
the railroad freight congestion problems in the Chicago region, 
including possible administrative and legislative solutions, 
and report back to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations no later than January 15, 2002.
      Cuyahoga Valley scenic rail.--The Federal Railroad 
Administration is strongly encouraged to work closely with the 
Cuyahoga Valley scenic rail line to assist them in acquiring 
the necessary resources so that they may extend the line from 
Akron to Canton.

                   Railroad Research and Development

      The conference agreement provides $29,000,000 for 
railroad research and development instead of $27,375,000 as 
proposed by the House and $30,325,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. None of this funding is to be offset from user fees.
      The following adjustments were made to the budget 
request:

Hold Transportation Test Center to 2001 level...........       -$400,000
Provide half of new request for ride safety.............        -300,000
Integrated railway remote information service...........      +1,000,000
Marshall University/University of Nebraska..............      +1,100,000
Baltimore freight and passenger infrastructure study....        +750,000
Freight rail study along I-81 and I-95 corridors........        +250,000

      Integrated railway remote information service.--The 
conference agreement provides $1,000,000 for the integrated 
railway remote information service instead of $2,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The conferees direct FRA to evaluate 
this initiative and if the evaluation is positive, FRA should 
consider including sufficient funding in future budget requests 
to continue this work.
      Marshall University/University of Nebraska.--The 
conference agreement includes $1,100,000 to support Marshall 
University/University of Nebraska safety research projects in 
the areas of human factors, equipment defects, and train 
control methods, as outlined in the Senate report.
      Grade crossing education and enforcement.--FRA should 
continue to work with affected communities, including those in 
the states of Illinois and Ohio, to establish a comprehensive 
strategy to address highway-rail grade crossing safety through 
voluntary, cooperative, education, and enforcement activities. 
This program should include public and media information 
campaigns, meetings with communities on specific crossings and 
the unique safety problems associated with these crossings, as 
well as support for increased enforcement at crossings. FRA, in 
conjunction with the states and localities, should work to 
identify appropriate state and federal resources that may aid 
communities in their efforts.
      Baltimore, Maryland freight and passenger infrastructure 
study.--The conference agreement includes $750,000 to conduct a 
comprehensive study to assess problems in the freight and 
passenger rail infrastructure in the vicinity of Baltimore, 
Maryland. FRA shall carry out this study in cooperation with 
the state of Maryland, Amtrak, CSX Corporation and Norfolk 
Southern Corporation, as outlined in the Senate bill (Sec. 
351). The Administrator of FRA shall submit a report, including 
recommendations, on the results of the study to the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees not later than 24 months after 
the date of enactment of this Act.
      Freight rail study along I-81 and I-95 corridors.--A 
total of $250,000 has been provided to study ways to address 
freight rail access problems in Tennessee and Virginia along 
the I-81 and I-95 corridors. This study should contain a 
detailed market analysis on options to divert congested highway 
traffic onto rail and the costs of such options. This work 
should be carried out in cooperation with the affected states 
and Norfolk Southern Corporation. Financial support should be 
provided by each state.

            Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Program

      The conference agreement includes a provision, proposed 
by both the House and the Senate, specifying that no new direct 
loans or loan guarantee commitments shall be made using federal 
funds for the payment of any credit premium amounts during 
fiscal year 2002. No federal appropriation is required since a 
non-federal infrastructure partner may contribute the subsidy 
amount required by the Credit Reform Act of 1990 in the form of 
a credit risk premium. Once received, statutorily established 
investigation charges are immediately available for appraisals 
and necessary determinations and findings.

                    Next Generation High-Speed Rail

      The conference agreement provides $32,300,000 for the 
next generation high-speed rail program instead of $25,100,000 
as proposed by the House and $40,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The following table summarizes the conference agreement 
by budgetary activity:

Train control systems...................................     $11,750,000
    Illinois project....................................     (7,000,000)
    Michigan project....................................     (2,000,000)
    Train control--TTC..................................       (750,000)
    Wisconsin project...................................     (2,000,000)
Non-electric locomotives................................       6,550,000
    ALPS................................................     (3,550,000)
    Prototype locomotive................................     (3,000,000)
Grade crossings and innovative technologies:............       3,500,000
    N.C. sealed corridor................................       (700,000)
    Mitigating hazards..................................     (2,000,000)
    Low-cost technologies...............................       (800,000)
Track and structures....................................       1,000,000
Corridor planning activities............................       5,900,000
    SCAG corridor.......................................     (1,000,000)
    Gulf Coast corridor.................................       (600,000)
    Southeast corridor..................................        (50,000)
    Florida corridor....................................     (3,000,000)
    California corridor.................................     (1,250,000)
Magnetic levitation.....................................       3,600,000
    Washington-Baltimore................................     (1,175,000)
    Nevada-California...................................     (1,175,000)
    Greensburgh-Pittsburgh..............................     (1,250,000)
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      32,300,000

      Florida corridor.--The conferees have included $3,000,000 
for the study and design of high speed rail service in Florida 
and would urge that the study include St. Petersburg and 
Pinellas County as a possible terminus of any route plan.
      Rail-highway crossing hazard eliminations.--Under section 
1103 of TEA21, an automatic set-aside of $5,250,000 is made 
available each year for the elimination of rail-highway 
crossing hazards. A limited number of rail corridors are 
eligible for these funds. Of these set-aside funds, the 
following allocations were made:

                                                              Conference
High-speed rail corridor between Mobile, AL and New 
    Orleans, LA.........................................      $2,000,000
High-speed rail corridor between Stuyvesant and 
    Rennselaer, NY......................................       1,500,000
Richland County, SC.....................................         800,000
Richmond, VA............................................         250,000
Van Nuys, CA............................................         200,000
High-speed rail corridor between Minneapolis/St. Paul, 
    MN and Chicago, IL (TEA21)..........................         250,000
High-speed rail corridor between Milwaukee and Madison, 
    WI..................................................         250,000

                     Alaska Railroad Rehabilitation

      The conference agreement provides $20,000,000 for the 
Alaska Railroad as proposed by the Senate. The House bill 
contained no similar appropriation.

          National Rail Development and Rehabilitation Program

      The conference agreement deletes funding for the national 
rail development and rehabilitation program. The Senate 
included $12,000,000 for this new program. The House bill 
contained no similar provision.

     Capital Grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation

      The conference agreement provides $521,476,000 for 
capital grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation 
(Amtrak) as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                     Federal Transit Administration

                        Administrative Expenses

      The conference agreement provides $67,000,000 for 
administrative expenses of the Federal Transit Administration 
as proposed by both the House and the Senate. Within the total, 
the conference agreement appropriates $13,400,000 from the 
general fund as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes a provision, contained 
in both bills, that would reimburse the Department of 
Transportation's Inspector General $2,000,000 for costs 
associated with audits and investigations of transit-related 
issues. The conference agreement also includes a provision that 
limits the amount of funding available for the National transit 
database to $2,600,000.
      Full-time equivalent staff.--The conference agreement 
approves the budget request for 10 new staff; however, funding 
has been reduced for these positions by $431,000. The reduction 
reflects half-year funding for these new positions, which is 
consistent with staffing requests in other modal 
administrations and takes into consideration the high attrition 
rate at FTA (7.6 percent).
      Project and financial management oversight activities.--
The conferees direct that funding made available for the 
project management oversight function, section 23, shall 
include at least $28,580,000 for project management oversight 
and $4,815,000 for financial management oversight reviews. This 
funding consists of the takedown from the capital investment 
grants program ($33,164,000) and savings from funding new staff 
positions at a half-year level ($431,000). The conferees 
further direct that the FTA submit to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations, the Inspector General and the 
General Accounting Office the quarterly FMO and PMO reports for 
each project with a full funding grant agreement.
      Full funding grant agreements (FFGAs).--TEA21, as 
amended, requires that the FTA notify the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations as well as the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure and the Senate Committee on 
Banking 60 days before executing a full funding grant 
agreement. In its notification to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations, the conferees direct the FTA to 
include therein the following: (a) a copy of the proposed full 
funding grant agreement; (b) the total and annual federal 
appropriations required for that project; (c) yearly and total 
federal appropriations that can be reasonably planned or 
anticipated for future FFGAs for each fiscal year through 2003; 
(d) a detailed analysis of annual commitments for current and 
anticipated FFGAs against the program authorization; and (e) a 
financial analysis of the project's cost and sponsor's ability 
to finance, which shall be conducted by an independent examiner 
and shall include an assessment of the capital cost estimate 
and the finance plan; the source and security of all public- 
and private-sector financial instruments, the project's 
operating plan which enumerates the project's future revenue 
and ridership forecasts, and planned contingencies and risks 
associated with the project.
      The conferees also direct the FTA to inform the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations before approving scope 
changes in any full funding grant agreement. Correspondence 
relating to scope changes shall include any budget revisions or 
program changes that materially alter the project as originally 
stipulated in the full funding grant agreement, and shall 
include any proposed change in rail car procurements.

                             Formula Grants

                     (including transfer of funds)

      The conference agreement provides a total program level 
of $3,592,000,000 for transit formula grants, as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate. Within this total, the 
conference agreement appropriates $718,400,000 from the general 
fund as proposed by both the House and the Senate. The 
conference agreement provides that the general fund 
appropriation shall be available until expended.
      The conference agreement provides that funding made 
available under the clean fuels formula grant program under 
this heading shall be transferred to and merged with funding 
provided for the replacement, rehabilitation, and purchase of 
buses and related equipment and the construction of bus-related 
facilities under ``Federal Transit Administration, Capital 
investment grants''.
      The conference agreement includes a provision that sets 
aside $5,000,000 for the VIII Paralympiad for the Disabled, as 
proposed by the Senate. The House set aside $5,000,000 for both 
the XIX Winter Olympiad and the VIII Paralympiad for the 
Disabled. The conferees intend that use of these funds be for 
the transportation systems for athletes, media, spectators, and 
other officials associated with the VIII Paralympiad for the 
Disabled. Language is also included that directs that funds 
shall be distributed by the Secretary in grants only to the 
Utah Department of Transportation and that such grants shall 
not be subject to any local share requirement or limitation on 
operating assistance, or the Federal Transit Act.
      Distribution of formula funding.--Within the total 
funding level, the conferees anticipate that formula grants 
will be distributed as follows:

Urbanized area formula (sec. 5307)......................  $3,199,959,806
Elderly and individuals with disabilities (sec. 5310)...      84,604,801
Nonurbanized area formula (sec. 5311)...................     223,432,467
Paralympiad for the Disabled............................       5,000,000
Clean fuels programs (sec. 5308)........................      50,000,000
Alaska Railroad.........................................       4,825,700
Over-the-road bus accessibility.........................       6,950,000
Oversight...............................................      17,227,226

      Within the funding provided for over-the-road bus 
accessibility program: $5,200,000 for intercity fixed route 
service and $1,700,000 for local commuter services and charter 
or tour service.

                    university transportation research

      The conference agreement provides a total of $6,000,000 
for the university transportation research program as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate. Of this amount, $1,200,000 is 
from the general fund and shall be available until expended.

                     Transit Planning and Research

      The conference agreement provides a total of $116,000,000 
for transit planning and research, as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate. Within the total, the conference 
agreement appropriates $23,000,000 from the general fund as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate. The conference 
agreement provides that the general fund appropriation shall be 
available until expended.
      Within the funds appropriated for transit planning and 
research, $5,250,000 is provided for rural transportation 
assistance; $4,000,000 is provided for the National Transit 
Institute; $8,250,000 is provided for the transit cooperative 
research program; $55,422,400 is provided for metropolitan 
planning; $11,577,600 is provided for state planning; and 
$31,500,000 is provided for the national planning and research 
program.
      National planning and research.--Within the funding 
provided for national planning and research, the Federal 
Transit Administration shall make available the following 
amounts for the programs and activities listed below:

CALSTART (BRT and Mobility.dot.com).....................      $2,500,000
Santa Barbara electric transportation institute, CA.....         400,000
Electric vehicle institute, TN..........................         500,000
Hennepin County, MN community transportation............       1,000,000
University of South Florida rapid bus initiative........         250,000
Southeast Michigan transportation feasibility study.....         500,000
Long Island, NY City links study........................         250,000
Crystal City-Potomac Yard, VA transit alternatives......         250,000
North Dakota State University transit center for small 
    Urban areas.........................................         400,000
Georgia regional transportation authority/southern 
    California association of governments transit trip 
    Planning partnership................................         400,000
Center for composites manufacturing.....................         900,000
Washington state WestStart innovative transit vehicle...       2,000,000
West Virginia transit vehicle exhaust emissions 
    evaluation..........................................       1,400,000
Missouri soybean association biodiesel transit demo.....         750,000
Joblinks................................................       1,000,000
Project Action (TEA21)..................................       3,000,000

      The conference agreement deletes funding for the Garrett 
A. Morgan program (-$200,000) and reduces funding for increased 
international activities (-$200,000) as proposed by the House.
      Dollar coin study.--The conferees direct the FTA 
Administrator to conduct a study on the benefits and 
feasibility of having large transit and toll road systems use 
fare card technology that recognizes and accepts the Sacagawea 
dollar coins by April 1, 2002, as proposed by the Senate.

                      Trust Fund Share of Expenses

                (Liquidation of Contract Authorization)

                          (Highway Trust Fund)

      The conference agreement provides $5,397,800,000 in 
liquidating cash for the trust fund share of transit expenses 
as proposed by both the House and the Senate, and makes 
technical corrections to bill language, as proposed by the 
Senate.

                       Capital Investment Grants

                     (Including Transfer of Funds)

      The conference agreement provides a total program level 
of $2,841,000,000 to remain available until expended for 
capital investment grants as proposed by the House instead of 
$2,941,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the total, the 
conference agreement appropriates $568,200,000 from the general 
fund as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      Within the total program level, $1,136,400,000 is 
provided for fixed guideway modernization; $568,200,000 is 
provided for the replacement, rehabilitation, and purchase of 
buses and related equipment and the construction of bus-related 
facilities; and $1,136,400,000 is provided for new fixed 
guideway systems, as proposed by the House. The Senate 
increased funding for the new fixed guideway systems by 
$100,000,000, for a total of $1,236,400,000. In addition to the 
$1,136,400,000 provided in this Act for new starts, the 
conference agreement reallocates $1,488,840 to other new start 
projects contained in this Act. Reallocated funds are derived 
from unobligated balances from the following new start 
projects:

Hartford-Old Saybrook, CT project.......................        $496,280
New London-Waterfront, CT access project................         496,280
North Front Range, CO corridor feasibility study........         496,280

      The conference agreement deletes bill language, proposed 
by the House, prohibiting funding for section 3015(b) of Public 
Law 105-178. The Senate bill contained no similar provision.
      Three year availability of section 5309 discretionary 
funds.--The conferees direct the FTA to reprogram funds from 
recoveries and previous appropriations that remain available 
after three years and are available for reallocation to only 
those new starts that have full funding grant agreements in 
place on the date of enactment of this Act, and with respect to 
bus and bus facilities, only to those bus and bus facilities 
projects identified in the accompanying reports of the fiscal 
year 2002 Department of Transportation and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act. The FTA shall notify the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations 15 days prior to any such proposed 
reallocation. The conferees, however, direct the FTA not to 
reallocate funds provided in the 1998 and 1999 Department of 
Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Acts for the 
following projects:

Riverside County--San Jacinto, CA branch line project
Savannah, GA water taxi
Chambersburg, PA intermodal facility and transit vehicles
Northern New Mexico park and ride facilities
Albuquerque, NM-Alvarado multi-modal transit center
Albuquerque, NM light rail project
New York, New York-Midtown West intermodal ferry terminal 
        project
Birmingham-Jefferson County, AL buses
Prichard, AL bus and bus facilities
King County, Washington-Elliot Bay water taxi
Morgantown, WV fixed guideway modernization project
Wilkes-Barre, PA intermodal facility
Towamencin Township, PA intermodal bus transportation center
Harrisburg, PA-Capital Area Transit/Corridor One project
Philadelphia-Reading, PA-SEPTA Schuylkill Valley Metro
Washington, D.C., intermodal transportation center
Burlington-Essex Junction Commuter Rail, VT
Buffalo, NY Auditorium intermodal center
Cotati Santa Rosa, CA intermodal facility
Cotati/Santa Rosa/Rohnert Park, CA intermodal facility
Fayette County, PA buses
Red Rose, PA transit bus terminal
Somerset County, PA bus facilities and buses
Ulster County, NY bus facilities and equipment
St. Louis, MO, Bi-state intermodal center
Folsom, CA multimodal center
Cleveland-Berea, OH red line
Orange County, CA transitway project
Hartford, CT bus circulator
Lane County, OR bus rapid transit

      The conferees agree that when the Congress extends the 
availability of funds that remain unobligated after three years 
and would otherwise be available for reallocation at the 
discretion of the administrator, such funds are extended only 
for one additional year, absent further congressional 
direction.
      Bus and bus facilities.--The conference agreement 
provides $568,200,000, together with $50,000,000 transferred 
from ``Federal Transit Administration, formula grants'' and 
merged with funding under this heading, for the replacement, 
rehabilitation and purchase of buses and related equipment and 
the construction of bus-related facilities. No funding is made 
available to carryout the clean fuels program in this Act. In 
addition, funds made available for bus and bus facilities are 
to be supplemented with $1,733,658 from the following projects 
included in previous Appropriations Acts:

Carroll County, NH transportation alliance buses........        $198,500
New Hampshire statewide buses...........................          34,001
Gary, IN transit consortium buses.......................         310,157
Jefferson Parish, LA bus and bus facilities.............         347,375
Louisiana state infrastructure bank, bus and bus 
    facilities..........................................         347,375
North Slope borough, AK.................................         496,250

      Funds provided for buses and bus facilities are 
distributed as follows:

                    Project name and Conference total

Alabama:
    Alabama A&M buses and bus facilities................        $500,000
    Alabama State Dock intermodal passenger and freight 
      terminal..........................................       5,000,000
    Alabama-Tombigbee Regional Commission buses and vans         450,000
    Birmingham-Jefferson County Transit Authority buses.       2,000,000
    Gadsden Transportation Services.....................         250,000
    Huntsville Public Transit intermodel facility.......       1,000,000
    Montgomery Union Station/Moulton St. intermodal 
      facility and parking..............................       3,000,000
    University of North Alabama transit projects........       2,000,000
    University of South Alabama.........................       2,500,000
Alaska:
    City of Wasilla bus facility........................         600,000
    Fairbanks buses and bus facility....................       1,500,000
    Fairbanks intermodal facility.......................       2,200,000
    Mat-su Community Transit buses and facilities.......       1,400,000
    Port of Anchorage intermodal facility...............       2,950,000
    Port McKenzie buses and bus facilities..............       1,500,000
    Seward intermodal facility..........................       2,800,000
Arizona:
    City of Glendale buses..............................         175,000
    Phoenix Regional Public Transportation Authority 
      buses and bus facilities..........................       6,650,000
    Sun Tran CNG replacement buses and facilities.......       1,750,000
    Tucson intermodal center............................       2,800,000
Arkansas: Arkansas statewide buses and bus facilities 
    for urban, rural, elderly and disabled agencies.....       5,000,000
California:
    AC Transit..........................................         500,000
    Anaheim Resort transit project......................         500,000
    Antelope Valley transit authority bus facilities....         500,000
    Belle Vista park and ride...........................         250,000
    Boyle Heights bus facility..........................         350,000
    City of Burbank shuttle buses.......................         400,000
    City of Calabasas CNG smart shuttle.................         300,000
    City of Carpinteria electric-gasoline hybrid bus....         500,000
    City of Commerce CNG buses and bus facilities.......       1,000,000
    City of Fresno buses................................         750,000
    City of Monrovia natural gas vehicle fueling 
      facility..........................................         270,000
    City of Sierra Madre bus replacement................         150,000
    City of Visalia transit center......................       2,500,000
    Contra Costa Connection buses.......................         350,000
    Costa Mesa CNG facility.............................         250,000
    County of Amador bus replacement....................         119,000
    County of Calaveras bus fleet replacement...........         105,000
    County of El Dorado bus fleet expansion.............         475,000
    Davis, Sacramento hydrogen bus technology...........         900,000
    El Garces train/intermodal station..................       1,500,000
    Folsom railroad block project.......................         600,000
    Foothill Transit, CNG buses and bus facilities......       1,250,000
    Glendale Beeline CNG buses..........................         300,000
    Imperial Valley CNG bus maintenance facility........         250,000
    Livermore Amador Valley Transit Authority buses and 
      facility..........................................       1,500,000
    Livermore park and ride.............................         250,000
    Los Angeles Metro Transportation Authority rapid 
      buses and bus facilities..........................       3,500,000
    Merced County Transit CNG buses.....................         300,000
    City of Modesto, bus facilities.....................         200,000
    Monterey-Salinas Transit facility...................       1,500,000
    Morongo Basin Transit maintenance and administration 
      facility..........................................       1,000,000
    MUNI Central Control Facility.......................       1,000,000
    Municipal Transit Operators Coalition...............       2,000,000
    North Ukiah Transit Center..........................         300,000
    Orange County buses.................................         300,000
    Palmdale Transportation Center......................         250,000
    Palo Alto intermodal transit center.................         250,000
    Pasadena Area Rapid Transit System..................         400,000
    Placer County, CNG bus project......................       1,000,000
    Sacramento Regional buses and bus facilities........       1,000,000
    Sam Trans zero-emissions fuel cell buses............       1,000,000
    San Bernardino CNG/LNG buses........................         375,000
    San Dieguito Transportation Cooperative.............         300,000
    San Francisco Municipal buses and bus facilities....       4,000,000
    San Joaquin Regional Transit District Bus facility..         500,000
    San Mateo County Transit Districts clean fuel buses.       1,500,000
    Santa Ana bus base..................................       1,250,000
    Santa Barbara hybrid bus rapid transit project......       2,000,000
    Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority line 22 
      articulated buses.................................         600,000
    Santa Fe Springs CNG bus replacement................         500,000
    Sierra Madre Villa & Chinatown intermodal 
      transportation centers............................       3,000,000
    Solano Beach intermodal transit station.............         500,000
    Sonoma County landfill gas conversion facility......         500,000
    South Pasadena circulator bus.......................         300,000
    Sun Line Transit hydrogen refueling station.........         500,000
    Transportation Hub at the Village of Indian Hills...       1,000,000
    Yolo County, CNG buses..............................       1,000,000
Colorado: Statewide buses and bus facilities, Colorado..       7,750,000
Connecticut:
    Bridgeport intermodal corridor project..............       5,250,000
    East Haddam transportation vehicles and transit 
      facilities........................................         420,000
    Greater New Haven Transit District CNG vehicle 
      project (ConnDOT).................................       1,000,000
    Hartford-New Britain bus rapid transitway...........       9,000,000
    New Haven bus facility..............................         500,000
Delaware:
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, Delaware........       4,400,000
    Wrangle Hill buses and maintenance facility.........       3,000,000
District of Columbia: Washington Metropolitan Area 
    Transit Authority buses.............................       3,000,000
Florida:
    Broward County alternative vehicle mass transit 
      buses, buses, and bus facilities..................       2,500,000
    Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority 
      (LYNX) bus and bus facilities.....................       2,000,000
    Duval County/JTA community transportation 
      coordinator program, paratransit vehicles & 
      equipment.........................................       1,000,000
    Gainesville Regional Transit System, buses..........         500,000
    Hillsborough Area Transit Authority buses and bus 
      facilities........................................       2,000,000
    Jacksonville Transit Authority buses................         750,000
    Lakeland Citrus connection buses and bus facilities.         750,000
    Miami Beach development electrowave shuttle service.       3,000,000
    Miami-Dade bus fleet................................       2,000,000
    Northeast Miami-Dade passenger center...............         375,000
    Palm Tran buses.....................................         500,000
    Pinellas Suncoast Transit buses, trolleys, and 
      information technology............................       4,000,000
    South Florida Regional Transit buses and bus 
      facilities........................................       4,000,000
    South Miami intermodal pedestrian access project....       1,000,000
    Tallahassee bus facilities..........................         400,000
    TALTRAN intermodal center...........................         600,000
    Tri-Rail Cypress Creek intermodal facilities........         500,000
    VOTRAN buses........................................       2,750,000
    Winter Haven Area Transit bus and bus facilities....         750,000
Georgia:
    Atlanta, Metro Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority clean 
      fuel buses........................................       6,000,000
    Chatham Area Transit buses and bus facilities.......       3,600,000
    Cobb County Community Transit bus facilities........       1,000,000
    Georgia Department of Transportation replacement 
      buses.............................................       1,000,000
    Georgia Regional Transit Authority express bus 
      program...........................................       6,000,000
    Gwinnett County operations and maintenance facility.         500,000
    Macon terminal intermodal station...................       1,500,000
Hawaii:
    Honolulu buses and bus facilities...................       8,000,000
    Middle Street Transit Center........................         750,000
Idaho: Statewide buses, bus facilities, and equipment, 
    Idaho...............................................       3,500,000
Illinois: Statewide buses and bus facilities, Illinois..       9,430,000
Indiana:
    Cherry Street Project multi-modal facility..........       1,300,000
    Indiana bus consortium, buses and bus facilities....       4,000,000
    Indianapolis downtown transit facility..............       3,175,000
    South Bend Public Transit bus fleet replacement.....       2,500,000
    West Lafayette Transit Project buses and bus 
      facilities........................................       1,750,000
Iowa:
    Cedar Rapids intermodal facility....................       4,630,000
    Statewide bus replacement, Iowa.....................       5,000,000
Kansas:
    Fort Scott Public Transit buses and bus facilities..         300,000
    Kansas City Area Transit Authority buses............       1,500,000
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, Kansas..........       3,000,000
    Topeka Transit transfer center......................         600,000
    Wichita Transit Authority buses.....................         908,000
Kentucky:
    City of Frankfort transit program buses.............          96,000
    City of Maysville buses.............................         136,000
    Leslie County parking structure.....................       2,000,000
    Murray-Calloway Transit Authority bus facility......         200,000
    Pikeville parking and transit facility..............       5,000,000
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, Kentucky........       4,534,000
    Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky..............       1,500,000
    Transit Authority of River City buses and bus 
      facilities........................................       2,000,000
Louisiana:
    Louisiana Public Transit Association buses and bus 
      facilities........................................      13,050,000
    Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-
      Shreveport, intermodal parking facility...........       1,000,000
    St. Bernard Parish intermodal facility..............       1,000,000
    St. Tammany Parish park and ride....................         450,000
Maine:
    Auburn intermodal facility and parking garage.......         250,000
    Statewide buses, Maine..............................       3,000,000
Maryland: Statewide buses and bus facilities, Maryland..       8,500,000
Massachusetts:
    Attleboro intermodal facilities.....................       1,000,000
    Berkshire Regional Transit Authority buses..........         750,000
    Brockton Intermodal transit center..................       1,000,000
    Gallagher Intermodal Transportation bus hub and CNG 
      trolleys..........................................       1,000,000
    Holyoke Pulse Center................................         750,000
    Merrimack Valley Regional Transit Authority 
      (Amesbury) buses and bus facilities...............         500,000
    Merrimack Valley Regional Transit Authority 
      (Lawrence) buses and bus facilities...............         500,000
    MetroWest buses and bus facilities..................         500,000
    Montachusett intermodal facilities and parking in 
      Fitchburg/N. Leominster...........................       2,500,000
    Montachusett Regional Transit Authority bus 
      facilities........................................         100,000
    Salem/Beverly Intermodal Center.....................         500,000
    Springfield Union Station intermodal facility.......       4,000,000
Michigan:
    Alger County Public Transit.........................         200,000
    Antrium County Transportation buses.................          86,000
    Barry County Transit buses..........................          74,000
    Bay Area Transit Authority..........................         250,000
    Berrien County Department of Planning and Public 
      Works buses.......................................         200,000
    Blue Water Area Transportation Commission bus 
      facilities........................................       1,500,000
    Capital Area Transportation Authority buses, bus 
      facilities, and equipment.........................       2,250,000
    Charlevoix County Public Transit....................         125,000
    City of Niles buses and bus facilities..............          42,000
    Crawford County Transportation Authority buses......         175,000
    Delta County Transit Authority......................          60,000
    Detroit Department of Transportation bus replacement       5,750,000
    Eastern UP Transportation Authority.................         100,000
    Flint Mass Transportation Authority replacement 
      buses and vans....................................       1,050,000
    Greater Lapeer Transportation Authority bus and bus 
      facilities........................................         350,000
    Harbor Transit bus and bus facilities...............         200,000
    Interurban Transit Authority buses..................          82,000
    Interurban Transit Partnership surface 
      transportation center (Grand Rapids)..............       5,000,000
    Ionia Area Transportation Dial-a-Ride...............         284,000
    Isabelia County facilities and equipment............         227,000
    Kalamazoo County Care-A-Van buses and equipment.....         130,000
    Kalkaska Public Transit buses.......................         250,000
    Livingston Essential Transportation Service buses 
      and equipment.....................................         247,000
    Ludington Transit Facility..........................         500,000
    Marquette County Transit Authority buses and bus 
      facility..........................................       1,000,000
    Midland County buses................................         300,000
    Milan Public Transit buses..........................         100,000
    Muskegon Area Transit System facility...............       1,650,000
    Northern Oakland Transportation Authority...........         150,000
    Otsego County Public Transit........................         300,000
    Sault Ste. Marie dial-a-ride........................          88,000
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, Michigan........       2,000,000
    Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional 
      Transportation buses..............................       2,110,000
    Van Buren County Public Transit buses...............         201,000
Minnesota:
    Duluth Transit Authority buses, bus facilities, and 
      equipment.........................................         500,000
    Grand Rapids/Gilbert buses and bus facilities.......         210,000
    Greater Minnesota Transit Authority bus, paratransit 
      and transit hub (MNDOT)...........................       3,750,000
    Metro transit buses and bus facilities (Twin Cities)      13,500,000
    Moorhead buses, bus facilities, and equipment.......         100,000
    Mower County Public Transit Initiative facility.....         500,000
    Rush Line Corridor buses and bus facilities.........         500,000
    St. Cloud buses, bus facilities, and equipment......       1,500,000
Mississippi:
    Brookhaven multi-modal facility.....................       1,000,000
    Harrison county multi-modal facilities and shuttle 
      service...........................................       4,000,000
    Hattiesburg intermodal facility.....................       3,500,000
    Jackson multi-modal transportation center...........       2,000,000
Missouri:
    Cab Care paratransit facility.......................         500,000
    Kansas City Area Transit Authority buses and radio 
      equipment.........................................       4,500,000
    Kansas City bus rapid transit.......................       2,500,000
    Missouri Pacific Depot..............................         500,000
    OATS buses and bus facilities.......................       2,000,000
    Southeast Missouri State, Dunklin, Mississippi, 
      Scott, Stoddard, and Cape Giradeau Counties buses 
      and facilities....................................       1,750,000
    Southwest Missouri State University intermodal 
      transfer facility.................................       2,500,000
    St. Louis Bi-State Development Authority buses and 
      facilities........................................       4,000,000
Montana:
    Billings Logan international airport bus terminal 
      and facility......................................       1,500,000
    Butte-Silver Bow bus facility.......................         500,000
    Montana statewide bus and bus facilities............       2,150,000
Nebraska: Buffalo County buses and maintenance facility.         100,000
Nevada:
    Las Vegas Boulevard North Corridor BRT, clean 
      diesel-electric buses.............................       1,750,000
    Regional Transport Commission of Southern Nevada bus 
      rapid transit.....................................       4,500,000
    Reno Bus Rapid Transit high-capacity articulated 
      buses.............................................       1,500,000
    Reno/Sparks buses and bus facilities................       4,000,000
    Reno Suburban transit coaches.......................         500,000
New Hampshire:
    Granite State Clean Cities Coalition CNG buses and 
      facilities........................................       1,000,000
    Town of Ossipee multimodal visitor center...........       1,600,000
New Jersey:
    Bergen intermodal stations, park and ride and 
      shuttle service...................................       2,350,000
    Middlesex County jitney transit buses...............         400,000
    Trenton Rail Station rehabilitation.................       2,500,000
New Mexico:
    Albuquerque Alvarado Transportation Center (phase 
      II)...............................................       1,500,000
    Albuqerque buses and paratransit vehicles...........         500,000
    Las Cruces buses....................................         500,000
    Las Cruces intermodal transit facility..............       2,000,000
    Santa Fe buses and bus facilities...................       1,000,000
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, New Mexico......       1,000,000
    Village of Taos Ski Valley bus and bus facilities...         500,000
    West Side Transit facility and buses................       3,750,000
New York:
    Binghamton intermodal terminal......................       2,000,000
    Central New York Regional Transportation Authority..       3,250,000
    Greater Glens Falls Transit bus facility renovation.         500,000
    Long Island Rail Road Jamaica intermodal facilities.       3,000,000
    Martin Street Station...............................         325,000
    MTA Long Island buses...............................       2,000,000
    Nassau University Medical Center bus service 
      extension.........................................       1,000,000
    New Rochelle intermodal center......................       1,500,000
    New York City Dept. of Transportation, CNG buses and 
      facilities........................................       2,500,000
    Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority buses.....       2,500,000
    Pelham trolley......................................         260,000
    Poughkeepsie intermodal project.....................       1,000,000
    Rochester buses and facilities......................       1,000,000
    Saratoga Springs intermodal station.................       1,900,000
    Station Plaza commuter parking lot..................         500,000
    Sullivan County Coordinated Public Transportation 
      Service bus facility..............................         500,000
    Tompkins Consolidated Area transit center...........         624,000
    Tompkins County replacement buses...................       1,500,000
    Union Station--Oneida County facilities.............       1,250,000
    Westchester County Bee-Line low emission buses......       1,500,000
North Carolina: Statewide buses and bus facilities, 
    North Carolina......................................       7,000,000
North Dakota: Statewide buses and bus facilities, and 
    rural transit vehicles, North Dakota................       3,500,000
Ohio:
    Butler County transit facility......................       1,000,000
    Dayton, Wright-Dunbar Transit Access Project........       2,750,000
    Alliance intermodal facility........................       1,000,000
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, Ohio............       8,800,000
Oklahoma:
    Central Oklahoma transit facilities.................       4,000,000
    Oklahoma Department of Transportation transit 
      program buses and bus facilities..................       3,000,000
Oregon:
    Canby Transit buses.................................         200,000
    Clackamas County south corridor transit improvements       3,750,000
    Fort Clatsop Shuttling system.......................       2,000,000
    Lincoln County transportation service district bus 
      garage............................................          75,000
    Milwaukee Transit Center............................         200,000
    Rogue Valley Transit District, CNG buses............         850,000
    Salem Area Mass Transit, CNG buses..................       1,000,000
    Springfield bus transfer station....................       2,000,000
    Tillamook County Transportation District bus 
      facilities........................................         350,000
    Wasco County buses (Mid-Columbia Council of 
      Governments)......................................         105,000
Pennsylvania:
    Altoona bus facility (TEA-21).......................       3,000,000
    Allentown intermodal transportation center..........         500,000
    Area Transit Authority of North Central PA buses and 
      bus facilities....................................       1,000,000
    Berks Area Reading Transportation Authority buses 
      and bus facilities................................       2,800,000
    Bucks County intermodal facility improvement........         750,000
    Butler Township multi-modal transfer center.........         500,000
    Callowhill bus garage replacement...................       3,300,000
    Cambria County operations and maintenance facility..         750,000
    Centre Area Transportation Authority CNG buses......         800,000
    County of Lackawanna Transit bus facility...........         500,000
    Doylestown Area Regional Transit buses..............         100,000
    Endless Mountain Transportation Authority buses and 
      bus facilities....................................         350,000
    Fayette County Transit facility.....................       1,000,000
    Hershey intermodal transportation center............       1,250,000
    Indiana County Transit Authority buses and bus 
      facilities........................................         500,000
    LeHigh and Northampton Transportation Authority bus 
      facility..........................................         500,000
    Luzerne County Transit Authority buses..............         300,000
    Mid Mon Valley Transit Authority buses and bus 
      facilities........................................         250,000
    Mid-County Transit Authority buses and bus 
      facilities........................................         300,000
    Monroe County Transit Authority park and ride.......         600,000
    Montgomery County intermodal facility...............       1,000,000
    Port Authority of Allegheny buses...................       2,250,000
    Red Rose transit transfer center....................         500,000
    Schuylkill Transportation System....................         400,000
    Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority 
      trackless trolleys................................       1,000,000
    Somerset County Transpiration System buses..........         250,000
    Wilkes-Barre Intermodal facility....................       1,000,000
    York County bus replacement.........................       1,000,000
Rhode Island:
    Providence transportation information center........       1,500,000
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, Rhode Island....       4,500,000
South Carolina: Statewide buses and bus facility, South 
    Carolina............................................      10,000,000
South Dakota:
    Aberdeen Ride Line buses............................         100,000
    Mobridge Senior Citizen handicap-accessible vehicles          60,000
    Oglala Sioux Tribe buses and bus facilities.........       2,250,000
    Rosebud Sioux Tribe transportation vans.............          55,000
Tennessee:
    Memphis International Airport intermodal facility...       1,740,000
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, Tennessee.......      10,000,000
Texas:
    Abilene bus replacement.............................         500,000
    Austin Metrobus.....................................         750,000
    Brazos Transit ADA compliant buses..................         400,000
    Brazos Transit buses for Texas A & M University.....         750,000
    Brazos Transit buses, intermodal facility, and 
      parking facility..................................         750,000
    Brazos Transit park and ride facility...............         400,000
    Brownsville multimodal facility study...............         100,000
    Capital Metro park and ride.........................         500,000
    City of Huntsville buses............................         500,000
    Connection Capital Project for Community Transit 
      Facilities........................................         250,000
    El Paso buses.......................................         500,000
    Fort Worth Transportation Authority CNG buses.......       1,250,000
    Fort Worth intermodal center park and ride facility.         500,000
    Fort Worth 9th Street Transfer Station..............       1,600,000
    Houston Barker Cypress park and ride................       5,000,000
    Houston Main Street Corridor master plan............         500,000
    Liberty County buses................................         375,000
    San Antonio VIA Metro Transit Authority clean fuel 
      buses.............................................       1,750,000
    Sun Metro buses and bus facilities..................         500,000
    Texas Tech University buses, park and ride..........       1,000,000
    Waco Transit maintenance and administration facility       1,650,000
    Woodlands District park and ride....................         500,000
Utah:
    Statewide regional intermodal transportation 
      centers, Utah.....................................       3,000,000
    Utah Transit Authority and Park City Transit buses..         500,000
    Utah Transit Authority intermodal terminals.........       1,000,000
Vermont: Vermont Public Transit alternative fuel/hybrid 
    buses and facility..................................       2,000,000
Virginia:
    Colonial Williamsburg CNG buses.....................       1,000,000
    Greater Richmond Transit Downtown Transit Center....       1,000,000
    Hampton Roads regional buses........................       3,500,000
    Main Street multi-modal transportation center.......       2,500,000
    Potomac & Rappahannock Transportation Commission 
      buses.............................................       3,000,000
    Roanoke Area Dial-A-Ride............................       1,000,000
Virgin Island: Virgin Islands Transit (VITRAN) buses....         500,000
Washington:
    Bellevue Transportation Center......................       1,600,000
    City of Kent facility/Sound Transit, transit and 
      transit-related facilities........................         900,000
    Everett Transit buses and vans......................       1.750,000
    1-5 Trade Corridor/99th St facility.................       3.700,000
    Issaquah Highlands park and ride....................       2,000,000
    King County Transit Oriented Development Projects...       1,000,000
    Mukilteo multi-modal terminal and ferry.............       1,450,000
    Pierce Transit buses, vans, and equipment...........       2,500,000
    Snohomish county transit buses and bus facilities...       2,000,000
    Spokane Transit Authority, buses and bus facilities.       1,000,000
    Sound Transit regional transit hubs.................       9,500,000
    Statewide small transit systems, buses, and bus 
      facilities, Washington............................       3,500,000
West Virginia:
    Huntington Tri-State Authority bus facility.........         750,000
    Morgantown Intermodal parking facility..............       2,000,000
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, West Virginia...       4,000,000
Wisconsin: Statewide buses, bus facilities, and 
    equipment, Wisconsin................................      14,000,000
Wyoming:
    Statewide buses and bus facilities, Wyoming.........       2,500,000
    Southern Teton Area Rapid Transit bus facility......         500,000
Other: Fuel cell buses and bus facilities (TEA21).......       4,850,000

      Barker Cypress park and ride.--The fiscal year 2002 bus 
funds shall be available for land acquisition, design and 
construction of selected transit facilities in the Houston 
Metro service area, including Barker Cypress, Kingsland, West 
Bellfort, and Clear Lake park and ride lots and the South 
Freeway transit center.
      Commonwealth of Kentucky.--The conference agreement 
provides a total of $4,534,000 for the Kentucky Transportation 
Department to provide buses, vans, cutaways, and bus facilities 
in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Within the funds provided to 
the state, $200,000 shall be allocated to the Audubon Area 
Community Services; $600,000 shall be provided to the Bluegrass 
Community Action Services; $272,000 shall be allocated to the 
Central Kentucky Community Action Council; $46,000 shall be 
provided to the Community Action Council of Fayette and 
Lexington; $200,000 shall be allocated to the Community Action 
Council of Southern Kentucky; $136,000 shall be provided to 
Kentucky River Foothills; $80,000 for Lake Cumberland Community 
services; and $2,000,000 for southern and eastern Kentucky 
transit vehicles.
      State of Louisiana.--The conference agreement provides a 
total of $13,050,000 for bus and bus related facilities in the 
State of Louisiana. Within the funds provided to the state, 
$665,000 is for Baton Rouge, $1,335,000 is for Jefferson 
Parish, $2,263,000 is for Lafayette, $400,000 is for Lake 
Charles, $1,195,000 is for the Louisiana Department of 
Transportation, $535,000 is for Monroe, $5,192,000 is for New 
Orleans, and $1,465,000 is for Shreveport.
      State of Montana.--The conference agreement provides a 
total of $2,250,000 for buses and bus facilities within the 
State of Montana. Within the funds provided to the state, 
$600,000 shall be used for the Ravalli county council on aging 
bus facility and $550,000 shall be used for Area VII agency on 
aging bus facility.
      State of Washington.--The conference agreement provides 
$3,500,000 to the Washington State Department of Transportation 
(WSDOT) for bus and bus facilities. Within the funds provided, 
$440,000 shall be allocated to Clallam transit, $928,000 shall 
be allocated to Grays Harbor Transportation, $632,000 shall be 
allocated to Island Transit, $336,000 shall be allocated to 
Link Transit, $385,000 shall be allocated to Mason County 
Transportation Authority, and $750,000 to Valley Transit.
      Fiscal year 2001 project clarifications.--The conference 
agreement permits projects, identified in the House report, to 
use fiscal year 2001 appropriations for additional work. 
Specifically, funds appropriated for the Lowell, Massachusetts 
transit hub can be used for the Hale Street bus maintenance and 
operations center; funds appropriated for the Municipal Transit 
Operators in California can be used for bus and bus facilities; 
funds appropriated for the King County Metro Eastgate park and 
ride can be used for the Issaquah Highlands park and ride; and 
funds allocated for buses for Suburban Mobility Authority for 
Regional Transportation (SMART) in Southeast Michigan may also 
be available for bus facilities.
      Burlington multi-modal.--Funds appropriated to the 
Burlington, Vermont multi-modal transit project in fiscal years 
1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001 will be available for construction 
of the multimodal project and other transit improvements.
      New fixed guideway systems.--In total, the conference 
agreement provides $1,137,888,840 for new fixed guideway 
systems, of which $1,136,400,000 is from new appropriations and 
$1,488,840 is derived from funds made available in previous 
Appropriations Acts that have been reprogrammed to new starts 
funding in fiscal year 2002.
      Appropriations for full funding grant agreements 
(FFGA).--The number of potential new starts projects is 
expanding rapidly. Currently, there are over 110 projects under 
consideration that are estimated to cost over $60 billion, if 
funded to completion. While the conference agreement has funded 
many worthy projects in the new starts program, there are not 
sufficient federal resources available to fund even a fraction 
of the projects under consideration. As a result, the conferees 
direct FTA not to sign any new full funding grant agreements 
after September 30, 2002 that have a maximum federal share of 
higher than 60 percent. This policy will provide local sponsors 
sufficient time to increase their contributions to these 
projects, if necessary, and will free up additional federal 
resources for other meritorious projects seeking an FFGA.
      The conference agreement provides for the following 
distribution of the recommended funding for new fixed guideway 
systems as follows:

                                                              Conference
Alaska or Hawaii ferry projects.........................     $10,296,000
Albuquerque, New Mexico, light rail project.............       1,000,000
Atlanta, Georgia, North line extension project..........      25,000,000
Baltimore, Maryland, central light rail transit double 
    track project.......................................      13,000,000
Baltimore, Maryland, rail transit project...............       1,500,000
Birmingham, Alabama, transit corridor project...........       2,000,000
Boston, Massachusetts, South Boston Piers transitway 
    project.............................................      10,631,245
Boston, Massachusetts, Urban ring transit project.......         500,000
Charlotte, North Carolina, South corridor light rail 
    transit project.....................................       7,000,000
Chicago, Illinois, Douglas branch reconstruction project      32,750,000
Chicago, Illinois, METRA commuter rail and line 
    extension projects..................................      55,000,000
Chicago, Illinois, Ravenswood reconstruction project....       3,000,000
Cleveland, Ohio, Euclid corridor transportation project.       6,000,000
Dallas, Texas, North central light rail transit 
    extension project...................................      70,000,000
Denver, Colorado, Southeast corridor light rail transit 
    project.............................................      55,000,000
Denver, Colorado, Southwest corridor light rail transit 
    project.............................................         192,492
Des Moines, Iowa, DSM bus feasibility project...........         150,000
Dubuque, Iowa, light rail feasibility project...........         200,000
Dulles corridor, Virginia, bus rapid transit project....      25,000,000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Tri-County commuter rail 
    upgrades project....................................      27,000,000
Forth Worth, Texas, Trinity railway express project.....       2,000,000
Grand Rapids, Michigan, ITP metro area, major corridor 
    project.............................................         750,000
Honolulu, Hawaii, bus rapid transit project.............      12,000,000
Houston, Texas, Metro advanced transit plan project.....      10,000,000
Iowa, Metrolink, light rail feasibility project.........         300,000
Johnson County, Kansas-Kansas City, Missouri, I-35 
    commuter rail project...............................       1,500,000
Kenosha-Racine, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, commuter rail 
    extension project...................................       2,000,000
Largo, Maryland, metrorail extension project............      55,000,000
Little Rock, Arkansas, river rail project...............       2,000,000
Long Island Rail Road, New York, East Side access 
    project.............................................      14,744,420
Los Angeles, California, North Hollywood extension 
    project.............................................       9,289,557
Los Angeles, California, East Side corridor light rail 
    transit project.....................................       7,500,000
Lowell, Massachusetts-Nashua, New Hampshire, commuter 
    rail extension project..............................       3,000,000
Maryland (MARC) commuter rail improvements projects.....      12,000,000
Memphis, Tennessee, Medical center rail extension 
    project.............................................      19,170,000
Miami, Florida, South Miami-Dade busway extension 
    project.............................................       5,000,000
Minneapolis-Rice, Minnesota, Northstar corridor commuter 
    rail project........................................      10,000,000
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, Hiawatha corridor light 
    rail transit project................................      50,000,000
Nashville, Tennessee, East corridor commuter rail 
    project.............................................       4,000,000
New Jersey Hudson-Bergen light rail transit project.....     141,000,000
New Orleans, Louisiana, Canal Street car line project...      15,000,000
New Orleans, Louisiana, Desire corridor streetcar 
    project.............................................      $1,200,000
New York, New York, Second avenue subway project........       2,000,000
Newark-Elizabeth, New Jersey, rail link project.........      20,000,000
Northeast Indianapolis, Indiana downtown corridor 
    project.............................................       2,500,000
Northern Indiana South Shore commuter rail project......       2,500,000
Oceanside-Escondido, California, light rail extension 
    project.............................................       6,500,000
Ohio, Central Ohio North Corridor rail (COTA) project...         500,000
Pawtucket-TF Green, Rhode Island, commuter rail and 
    maintenance facility project........................       5,000,000
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Schuylkill Valley metro 
    project.............................................       9,000,000
Phoenix, Arizona, Central Phoenix/East Valley corridor 
    project.............................................      10,000,000
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, North Shore connector light 
    rail transit project................................       8,000,000
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, stage II light rail transit 
    reconstruction project..............................      18,000,000
Portland, Oregon, Interstate MAX light rail transit 
    extension project...................................      64,000,000
Puget Sound, Washington, RTA Sounder commuter rail 
    project.............................................      20,000,000
Raleigh, North Carolina, Triangle transit project.......       9,000,000
Sacramento, California, light rail transit extension 
    project.............................................         328,000
Salt Lake City, Utah, CBD to University light rail 
    transit project.....................................      14,000,000
Salt Lake City, Utah, University Medical Center light 
    rail transit extension project......................       3,000,000
San Diego, California, Mission Valley East light rail 
    transit extension...................................      60,000,000
San Diego, California, Mid Coast corridor project.......       1,000,000
San Francisco, California, BART extension to the airport 
    project.............................................      75,673,790
San Jose, California, Tasman West light rail transit 
    project.............................................         113,336
San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tren Urbano project..............      40,000,000
Sioux City, Iowa, light rail project....................       1,700,000
St. Louis-St. Clair, Missouri, Metrolink extension 
    project.............................................      28,000,000
Stamford, Connecticut, urban transitway project.........       5,000,000
Stockton, California, Altamount commuter rail project...       3,000,000
Virginia Railway Express station improvements project...       3,000,000
Washington County, Oregon, Wilsonville to Beaverton 
    commuter rail project...............................         500,000
Wasilla, Alaska, alternative route project..............       2,500,000
Yosemite, California, area regional transportation 
    system project......................................         400,000

      Charlotte, North Carolina, South corridor light rail 
transit project.--The conference agreement provides $7,000,000 
for the south corridor light rail project for the design and 
construction of an 11-mile light rail transit line extending 
from Uptown Charlotte to the town of Pineville, North Carolina, 
with continuing service being planned to the City of Rock Hill 
in York County, South Carolina.
      Houston, Texas, advanced transit plan project.--The 
conference agreement includes $10,000,000 for the Houston 
advanced transit plan project. The conference agreement 
modifies the funding prohibition, proposed by the House, to 
apply only for the design or construction of a light rail 
system in Houston, Texas until the appropriate studies have 
been completed and voters in the Houston Metro service-area 
have approved the rail system in an election called for that 
purpose.
      Puget Sound, Washington, Sounder commuter rail project.--
The conference agreement includes $20,000,000 for the Puget 
Sound, Sounder commuter rail project. These funds may be used 
both to implement commuter rail service between Lakewood and 
Everett and to develop facilities between Tacoma and Lakewood.

                 Job Access and Reverse Commute Grants

      The conference agreement includes a total program level 
of $125,000,000 for the job access and reverse commute grants 
as proposed by both the House and the Senate. Within this 
total, $25,000,000 is derived from the general fund. The 
conference agreement includes a provision that waives the cap 
for small urban and rural areas and provides that up to 
$250,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading may be 
used for technical assistance, technical support, and 
performance reviews of the job access and reverse commute 
grants program.
      Funds appropriated for the job access and reverse commute 
grants program are to be distributed as follows:

        Project name                                          Conference
                                                                   level
Abilene, Texas Citilink Program.........................        $150,000
AC Transit, California..................................       2,000,000
Atlanta Regional Commission, Georgia....................       1,000,000
Austin, Texas...........................................         500,000
Baton Rouge, Louisiana Ways to Work.....................         750,000
Bloomington to Normal, Illinois, Wheels to Work.........         500,000
Broome County, New York Transit.........................         500,000
Buncombe County, North Carolina.........................         100,000
Burlington Community Land Trust/Good News Garage........         850,000
Central Arkansas Transit Authority......................         500,000
Central Ohio Transit Authority..........................       1,000,000
Charlotte Area Transit, North Carolina..................         500,000
Chatham, Georgia........................................       1,000,000
Chattanooga, Tennessee..................................         500,000
Charlottesville, Virginia Jefferson Area United 
    Transportation......................................         375,000
City of Santa Fe, New Mexico............................         630,000
Columbia County, New York...............................         100,000
Community Transportation Association of America.........         625,000
Corpus Christi, Texas...................................         550,000
Del Norte County, California............................         700,000
Delaware Department of Transportation...................         750,000
DuPage County, Illinois.................................         500,000
Flint, Michigan Mass Transportation Authority...........       1,000,000
Galveston, Texas........................................         600,000
Genessee-Rochester Regional Transportation Authority, 
    New York............................................         400,000
Georgetown Metro Connection.............................       1,000,000
Hillsbourgh Area Regional Transit, Tampa, Florida.......         900,000
Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation, Indiana 
    (Indyflex)..........................................       1,000,000
Jacksonville Transportation Authority's Choice Ride 
    program.............................................       1,000,000
Jefferson County, Alabama...............................       2,000,000
Kenai Peninsula Transit Planning, Alaska................         500,000
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania..........................         198,000
Lehigh and Northampton Transportation Authority, 
    Pennsylvania........................................         250,000
Los Angeles, California.................................       2,000,000
Macon-Bibb County, Georgia..............................         400,000
Maricopa County, Arizona................................       1,200,000
MASCOT Matanuska, Susitna Valley, Alaska................         200,000
Metropolitan Kansas City, Missouri......................       1,000,000
Metropolitan Transportation Commission LIFT program, 
    California..........................................       3,000,000
Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota.........................       1,000,000
New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department..       2,000,000
New York Metropolitan Area Transportation Authority.....       1,000,000
Northern Tier Dial-A-Ride, Massachusetts................         400,000
Oglala Sioux Tribe, North Dakota........................         150,000
Ohio Ways to Work.......................................       1,500,000
Oklahoma Transit Association............................       5,000,000
Pace, Illinois suburban buses...........................         561,000
Palm Beach County, Florida..............................         500,000
Pennsylvania Ways to Work program.......................       1,500,000
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania................................       2,000,000
Port Authority of Allegheny County......................       2,000,000
Red Rose Transit, Pennsylvania..........................         200,000
Sacramento, California..................................       2,000,000
Salem Area Transit, Oregon..............................         700,000
Santa Clara County, California..........................         500,000
Santa Fe, New Mexico....................................         630,000
SEPTA, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.......................       6,000,000
Seward Transit Service, Alaska..........................         200,000
Southeast Missouri Council, Missouri....................       1,200,000
Southeastern Massachusetts Regional Transit Authority...         100,000
Springfield, Illinois Transportation to employment and 
    self-sufficiency....................................         250,000
State of Connecticut....................................       3,500,000
State of Florida, Choice Ride program...................       1,000,000
State of Idaho..........................................         300,000
State of Iowa...........................................       1,700,000
State of Maryland.......................................       5,000,000
State of Nevada.........................................         300,000
State of New Jersey.....................................       3,000,000
State of Ohio...........................................       1,500,000
State of Pennsylvania...................................       1,500,000
State of Rhode Island...................................       2,000,000
State of Tennessee......................................       4,500,000
State of Washington.....................................       3,000,000
State of West Virginia..................................         800,000
State of Wisconsin......................................       5,200,000
Sullivan County, New York...............................         400,000
Tennessee small rural systems...........................       1,000,000
Topeka, Kansas Metropolitan Transit Authority...........         600,000
Tri-Met Region, Oregon..................................       1,800,000
Tuscaloosa, Alabama disabilities advocacy program.......       1,000,000
Washington Area Metropolitan Transit Authority..........       2,500,000
Westchester County, New York............................       1,000,000
Wichita, Kansas Transit.................................       1,450,000
Winchester, Virginia....................................       1,000,000
Worchester, Massachusetts...............................         400,000
WorkFirst Transportation Initiative, state of Washington       3,000,000
Workforce Investment Board of Southeast Missouri........         800,000
Workforce Investment Board of Southwest Missouri........         600,000
Wyandotte County/Kansas City, Kansas....................       1,000,000

      State of Maryland.--Within the funds made available to 
the state of Maryland, Department of Transportation, $800,000 
shall be for the Montgomery County to operate the transit 
system during expanded hours of service and $200,000 shall be 
for the Sojourner-Douglass College in Baltimore for the 
college's workforce transportation and referral, as proposed by 
the Senate.
      Iowa public transit.--Funds appropriated in fiscal year 
2001 for the Des Moines, Dubuque, Sioux City, Delaware and 
Jackson Counties job access and reverse commute grant programs 
shall also be made available for the Region 3 Regional Service 
Expansion, Region 4 Evening Service Expansion, Region 8 Job 
Access program, Regional JARC Expansion and Region 12 Job Corps 
and ECI Project.

             Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation

                       operations and maintenance

                    (harbor maintenance trust fund)

      The conference agreement appropriates $13,345,000 for 
operations and maintenance of the Saint Lawrence Seaway 
Development Corporation as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$13,426,000 as proposed by the House.
      Ballast Water Management.--The conferees direct that a 
report on ballast water management and its efforts to 
coordinate with the United States Coast Guard to control non-
indigenous aquatic nuisance species be submitted to the House 
and Senate Committee on Appropriations by April 1, 2002.
      Detroit River Navigator.--The conferees understand that 
the Seaway will provide the salary for the Detroit River 
Navigator during fiscal year 2002. The conferees support such 
action.

              Research and Special Programs Administration

                     research and special programs

      The conference agreement appropriates $37,279,000 for 
research and special programs instead of $36,487,000 as 
proposed by the House and $41,993,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within this total, $2,170,000 is available until 
September 30, 2004, as proposed by the House instead of 
$5,434,000 as proposed by the Senate. The following adjustments 
are made to the budget estimate:

Reduce funding for 14 new computer and administrative 
    positions...........................................       -$690,000
Reduce funding for research and development planning....      -1,675,000
Reduce funding for human centered fatigue research......        -300,000
Reduce funding for business modernization...............      -1,988,000
Reduce funding for unjustified amounts..................         -60,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
Net adjustment to budget estimate.......................      -4,713,000

      The conference agreement permits up to $1,200,000 in fees 
be collected and deposited in the general fund of the Treasury 
as offsetting receipts. Also, the conference agreement includes 
language that permits funds received from states, counties, 
municipalities, other public authorities and private sources 
for expenses incurred for training, reports publication and 
dissemination, and travel expenses incurred in the performance 
of hazardous materials exemptions and approval functions. The 
House and Senate proposed both of these provisions.
      The conference agreement directs the Research and Special 
Programs Administration (RSPA) to submit to both the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations before February 1, 2002, a 
strategic plan outlining the improvements in information 
technology and business modernization that will be made during 
the next few years. The plan should specify the necessary steps 
to be taken and funds needed to ensure that RSPA's missions and 
activities will be underpinned by a current information 
technology infrastructure with the capability for upgrading.

                            pipeline safety

                         (pipeline safety fund)

                    (oil spill liability trust fund)

      The conference agreement provides a total of $58,250,000 
for the pipeline safety program instead of $48,475,000 as 
proposed by the House and $58,750,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within this total, $20,707,000 is available until 
September 30, 2003, as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$30,828,000 as proposed by the House.
      Of this total, the conference agreement specifies that 
$7,864,000 shall be derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust 
Fund and $50,386,000 from the Pipeline Safety Fund. The House 
bill allocated $7,472,000 from the Oil Spill Liability Trust 
Fund and $41,003,000 from the Pipeline Safety Trust Fund. The 
Senate bill provided $11,472,000 from the Oil Spill Liability 
Trust Fund and $47,278,000 from the Pipeline Safety Fund.
      The following table reflects the total allocation for 
pipeline safety in fiscal year 2002:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Oil spill
                      Budget activity                        Pipeline safety   liability trust        Total
                                                                  fund              fund
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Personnel, compensation, and benefits.....................       $10,955,000          $900,000       $11,855,000
Operating expenses........................................         4,194,000           531,000         4,725,000
Information systems.......................................           935,000           400,000         1,335,000
Risk assessment and technical studies.....................           850,000           400,000         1,250,000
Integrity management program..............................         6,253,000         1,190,000         7,443,000
Compliance................................................           200,000           100,000           300,000
Training and information dissemination....................           900,000           300,000         1,200,000
Emergency notification....................................           100,000  ................           100,000
Damage prevention/public education campaign...............         3,213,000           200,000         3,413,000
Oil Pollution Act.........................................  ................         2,443,000         2,443,000
Research and development..................................         4,736,000  ................         4,736,000
State grants..............................................        15,000,000         1,400,000        16,400,000
Risk management...........................................            50,000  ................            50,000
One-call notification.....................................         1,000,000  ................         1,000,000
Interstate oversight grants...............................         2,000,000  ................         2,000,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total...............................................        50,386,000         7,864,000        58,250,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      The conference agreement approves the request for 26 new 
positions to support a new community based program and to 
support the new integrity management program. In addition, the 
conference agreement exceeds the budget request for the 
integrity management program by $2,500,000 for a total of 
$7,443,000, and by $1,992,000 for office of pipeline safety 
research and development for a total of $4,736,000.
      Within the funds provided for the integrity management 
program, the conference agreement provides $750,000 for the 
office of pipeline safety and state training, and adequate 
funds to interpret pigging data submitted by industry, to 
witness new construction of pipelines, and to develop improved 
information systems needed to monitor and evaluate industry 
data supplied to OPS.
      Within the funds provided for the research and 
development, the conference agreement provides $600,000 for 
airborne environmental laser mapping technology research and 
engineering to support improved leak detection, analysis, and 
response by Federal, state, and industry pipeline safety 
officials.
      State of Washington.--The conferees direct that of the 
unobligated fiscal year 2001 funds for the Washington State 
pipeline safety program, which is estimated at $800,000, be 
obligated in fiscal year 2002 as soon as possible.

                     emergency preparedness grants

                     (emergency preparedness fund)

      The conference agreement provides $200,000 for emergency 
preparedness grants as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate. The conference agreement includes a limitation on 
obligations of $14,300,000, consistent with both the House and 
Senate proposals.

                      office of inspector general

                         salaries and expenses

      The conference agreement appropriates $50,614,000 for 
this office as proposed by both the House and the Senate. In 
addition, the agreement includes language under the Federal 
Transit Administration that would reimburse the Department of 
Transportation's Inspector General $2,000,000 for costs 
associated with audits and investigations of transit-related 
issues. Bill language is also included that authorizes the use 
of funds for investigation of fraud, deceptive trade practices, 
and unfair methods of competition in the airline industry, as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                      Surface Transportation Board

                         salaries and expenses

      The conference agreement appropriates $18,457,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the Surface Transportation Board as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $18,563,000 as proposed by 
the House. The conference agreement includes language as 
proposed by both the House and Senate that allows the Board to 
offset $950,000 of its appropriation from fees collected during 
the fiscal year for a total program level of $17,507,000.
      Union Pacific/Southern Pacific merger.--On December 12, 
1997, the Board granted a joint request of Union Pacific 
Railroad Company and the City of Wichita and Sedgwick County, 
KS (Wichita/Sedgwick) to toll the 18-month mitigation study 
pending in Finance Docket No. 32760. The decision indicated 
that at such time as the parties reach agreement or discontinue 
negotiations, the Board would take appropriate action.
      By petition filed June 26, 1998, Wichita/Sedgwick and UP/
SP indicated that they had entered into an agreement, and 
jointly petitioned the Board to impose the agreement as a 
condition of the Board's approval of the UP/SP merger. By 
decision dated July 8, 1998, the Board agreed and imposed the 
agreement as a condition to the UP/SP merger. The terms of the 
negotiated agreement remain in effect. If UP/SP or any of its 
divisions or subsidiaries materially changes or is unable to 
achieve the assumptions on which the Board based its final 
environmental mitigation measures, then the Board should reopen 
Finance Docket 32760 if requested by interested parties, and 
prescribe additional mitigation properly reflecting these 
changes if shown to be appropriate.
      Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad (DM&E).--For more 
than 3 years, the Surface Transportation Board has been 
considering an application on the Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern 
Railroad. The conferees believe that the board should complete 
action on this proceeding. A petitioner has a legitimate 
expectation of receiving a decision on an application within a 
reasonable period of time.

                  bureau of transportation statistics

                     office of airline information

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

      The conference agreement deletes funding, proposed by the 
Senate, for the office of airline information. The House bill 
contained no similar appropriation.

                                TITLE II

                            RELATED AGENCIES

       Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board

                         salaries and expenses

      The conference agreement appropriates $5,015,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the Architectural and Transportation 
Barriers Compliance Board as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$5,046,000 as proposed by the House.

                  National Transportation Safety Board

                         Salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement includes $68,000,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the National Transportation Safety 
Board (NTSB), instead of $64,400,000 as proposed by the House 
and $70,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. This provides an 
increase of $5,058,000 (8 percent) above the fiscal year 2001 
enacted level. The additional $3,520,000 above the budget 
estimate will help the NTSB address needed financial management 
improvements and overtime requirements.

                               TITLE III

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

      Sec. 301 allows funds for aircraft; motor vehicles; 
liability insurance; uniforms; or allowances, as authorized by 
law as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 302 requires pay raises to be funded within 
appropriated levels in this Act or previous appropriations Acts 
as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 303 limits appropriations for services authorized by 
5 U.S.C. 3109 to the rate for an Executive Level IV as proposed 
by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 304 prohibits funds in this Act for salaries and 
expenses of more than 105 political and Presidential appointees 
in the Department of Transportation as proposed by the House 
instead of 98 political and Presidential appointees as proposed 
by the Senate. This level of appointees is expected to cover 
the recently enacted Transportation Security Administration. 
Sec. 304 also includes a provision that prohibits political and 
Presidential personnel to be assigned on temporary detail 
outside the Department of Transportation or an independent 
agency funded in this Act except for personnel assigned on 
temporary detail to the Office of Homeland Security. The House 
proposed a prohibition on all political and Presidential 
personnel funded in this Act from being assigned on temporary 
detail outside the Department of Transportation or an 
independent agency. The Senate proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 305 prohibits pay and other expenses for non-Federal 
parties in regulatory or adjudicatory proceedings funded in 
this Act as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 306 prohibits obligations beyond the current fiscal 
year and prohibits transfers of funds unless expressly so 
provided herein as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 307 limits consulting service expenditures of public 
record in procurement contracts as proposed by both the House 
and Senate.
      Sec. 308 prohibits funds for the National Highway Safety 
Advisory Commission as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 309 exempts previously made transit obligations from 
limitations on obligations as proposed by both the House and 
Senate.
      Sec. 310 modifies the distribution of the Federal-aid 
highway program proposed by the Senate. The House proposed no 
similar provision.
      Sec. 311 includes the Senate provision that prohibits 
recipients of funds made available in this Act to release 
personal information, including a social security number, 
medical or disability information, and photographs from a 
driver's license or motor vehicle record without express 
consent of the person to whom such information pertains; and 
prohibits the Secretary from withholding funds provided in this 
Act for any grantee if a state is in noncompliance with this 
provision. The House proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 312 prohibits funds to establish a vessel traffic 
safety fairway less than five miles wide between Santa Barbara 
and San Francisco traffic separation schemes as proposed by 
both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 313 allows airports to transfer to the Federal 
Aviation Administration instrument landing systems as proposed 
by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 314 allows funds for discretionary grants of the 
Federal Transit Administration for specific projects, except 
for fixed guideway modernization projects, not obligated by 
September 30, 2004, and other recoveries to be used for other 
projects under 49 U.S.C. 5309 as proposed by both the House and 
Senate.
      Sec. 315 allows transit funds appropriated before October 
1, 2001, and that remain available for expenditure to be 
transferred as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 316 prohibits funds to compensate in excess of 335 
technical staff years under the federally funded research and 
development center contract between the Federal Aviation 
Administration and the Center for Advanced Aviation Systems 
Development as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 317 allows funds received by the Federal Highway 
Administration, Federal Transit Administration, and the Federal 
Railroad Administration from States, counties, municipalities, 
other public authorities, and private sources for expenses 
incurred for training may be credited to each agency's 
respective accounts as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 318 rescinds $9,231,000 of funds made available for 
the value pricing pilot program under Public Law 105-178 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House proposed no similar 
rescission. Sec. 318 also rescinds $43,742,000 of funds made 
available for the transportation infrastructure finance and 
innovation program under Public Law 105-178. The House and 
Senate proposed no similar rescission.
      Sec. 319 allows the Secretary of Transportation to use up 
to 1 percent of the amounts made available for capital 
investment grants and loans (49 U.S.C. 5309) for project 
management oversight (49 U.S.C. 5327) beginning in fiscal year 
2002 and thereafter as proposed by the Senate. The House 
proposed the same provision for fiscal year 2002 only.
      Sec. 320 allows funds made available for Alaska or Hawaii 
ferry boats or ferry terminal facilities to be used to 
construct new vessels and facilities or to improve existing 
vessels and facilities, and for repair facilities as proposed 
by both the House and Senate. Sec. 320 also includes a 
provision proposed by the Senate that allows not more than 
$3,000,000 of the funds made available for ferry boats may be 
used by the State of Hawaii to initiate and operate a passenger 
ferryboat services demonstration project. The House contained 
no similar provision.
      Sec. 321 allows funds received by the Bureau of 
Transportation Statistics to be subject to the obligation 
limitation for Federal-aid highways and highway safety 
construction as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 322 amends section 3030(a) of Public Law 105-178 to 
authorize final design and construction of the Washington 
County-Wilsonville to Beaverton commuter rail project as 
proposed by the Senate. The House contained no similar 
provision.
      Sec. 323 amends section 3030(b) of Public Law 105-178 to 
authorize alternative analysis and preliminary engineering for 
the Detroit, Michigan Metropolitan Airport rail project as 
proposed by the Senate. The House contained no similar 
provision.
      Sec. 324 prohibits the use of funds for any type of 
training which: (1) does not meet needs for knowledge, skills, 
and abilities bearing directly on the performance of official 
duties; (2) could be highly stressful or emotional to the 
students; (3) does not provide prior notification of content 
and methods to be used during the training; (4) contains any 
religious concepts or ideas; (5) attempts to modify a person's 
values or lifestyle; or (6) is for AIDS awareness training, 
except for raising awareness of medical ramifications of AIDS 
and workplace rights as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 325 prohibits the use of funds in this Act for 
activities designed to influence Congress or a state 
legislature on legislation or appropriations except through 
proper, official channels as proposed by both the House and 
Senate.
      Sec. 326 requires compliance with the Buy American Act as 
proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 327 credits to appropriations of the Department of 
Transportation rebates, refunds, incentive payments, minor fees 
and other funds received by the Department from travel 
management centers, charge card programs, the subleasing of 
building space, and miscellaneous sources as proposed by both 
the House and Senate. Such funds received shall be available 
until December 31, 2002.
      Sec. 328 authorizes the Secretary of Transportation to 
allow issuers of any preferred stock to redeem or repurchase 
preferred stock sold to the Department of Transportation as 
proposed by the House. The Senate contained no similar 
provision.
      Sec. 329 provides $225,000 for the Amtrak Reform Council 
instead of $450,000 as proposed by the House and $420,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement did not 
include the provisions proposed by the House regarding section 
203(g)(1) of Public Law 105-134 on the Amtrak Reform Council's 
recommendations on Amtrak routes identified for closure or 
realignment. The Senate proposed no similar provisions.
      Sec. 330 appropriates $144,000,000 to the Secretary of 
Transportation to make grants for surface transportation 
projects instead of $20,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
House proposed no similar appropriation.
      Funds appropriated for surface transportation projects 
are to be distributed as follows:

Fourteen Mile Bridge replacement, Alabama...............      $4,300,000
Anderson County, South Carolina Transit System Project..       1,500,000
Arterial Railroad Grade Crossing, California............       2,000,000
Auburn University Center for Transportation Technology 
    Project, Alabama....................................      20,000,000
Bassett Creek Valley North-South Greenway, Minnesota....      10,000,000
Big South Fork Scenic Railroad enhancement project, 
    Kentucky............................................       1,500,000
Burlington to Middlebury Vermont Rail Line Project......       1,000,000
California State Polytechnic University roadways to 
    transit center, California..........................       2,000,000
Canton-Akron-Cleveland commuter rail, Ohio..............         500,000
Charleston, South Carolina, Parking Garage Project......      20,000,000
Construction of railroad overpass, US 69, Oklahoma......       2,000,000
Delaware Memorial Bridge Collision Avoidance Project, 
    Delaware............................................       1,300,000
Enser Bridge, Florida...................................         500,000
Fairfield, Connecticut Commuter Rail Project............       4,000,000
General Mitchell International Airport Rail Station 
    Project, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.......................       2,500,000
Greenwood, Mississippi, Rail track relocation and 
    Construction Project................................       2,000,000
Hawkins Crossing Interchange at Meridian, I-20/I-59, 
    Mississippi.........................................       1,000,000
Highway decking project I-5 corridor, California........       3,500,000
Highway railway grade crossing hazard elimination 
    program, Tennessee..................................       4,000,000
I-74 Mississippi River Bridge, Mississippi..............       2,000,000
Kansas City, Missouri Bus Rapid Transit Improvements....       5,000,000
Kingvale, California Satellite Operations Control Center 
    Project.............................................       2,000,000
Lake Rail Line, Lakeview, Oregon to Alturas, California.       1,750,000
Las Vegas, Nevada Monorail Project......................         500,000
Lincoln to Omaha NE Passenger Rail Project..............         200,000
Maine Marine Highway Development Project, Maine.........       1,500,000
Marathon County/Wausau MPO, Wisconsin...................       1,000,000
Martinsburg Roundhouse Redevelopment Project, 
    Martinsburg, West Virginia..........................       2,000,000
Minnesota Valley Regional Rail Authority Rehabilitation 
    Project, Minnesota..................................       1,000,000
Muskogee grade separation, Oklahoma.....................         500,000
Newark, New Jersey Penn Station Improvements............       2,000,000
Odyssey Maritime Project, Seattle, Washington...........       3,000,000
Portland to Astoria rail improvements, Oregon...........       2,000,000
Public exhibition of ``America's Transportation 
    Stories'', Michigan.................................       2,000,000
Rail overpass crossing, Claremore, Oklahoma.............         100,000
Restoration and Improvement of the Wichita Air Terminal, 
    Kansas..............................................         150,000
Roane County bridge replacement, Tennessee..............         150,000
Route 7 and 123 improvements in Northern Virginia.......       5,000,000
San Bernardino, California Metrolink project............         300,000
Santa Teresa Port of Entry HAZMAT, New Mexico...........       1,200,000
Scranton, Pennsylvania to New York City Rail Service 
    Project.............................................       1,000,000
Southeast Main Rail Relocation Project, Moorhead, 
    Minnesota...........................................       1,500,000
Southern Kentucky Intermodal Transportation Park, 
    Kentucky............................................       5,000,000
Syracuse bridge improvements on Auto Row, New York......       3,000,000
Truck relief route along US 87, New Big Spring, Texas...       2,000,000
Union County Red Bridge, Pennsylvania...................       1,300,000
Upgrade of 11 grade crossings, Superior, Wisconsin......         300,000
US 80/SR 26, Georgia....................................       1,000,000
Utah Central Valley Rail Line Sigurd/Salina to Levan 
    Project.............................................       1,000,000
Ventura County Highway Video Camera Monitoring Project, 
    California..........................................         500,000
Vertical Clearance Improvement, CP Maine Line, New York.       1,500,000
Vickers Rail Crossing grade separation, Northwood, Ohio.       4,000,000
West Laredo Multimodal Trade Corridor/grade crossings, 
    Texas...............................................       3,250,000
Whittier Bridge between Amesbury and Newburyport, 
    Massachusetts.......................................       1,500,000
Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania to Scranton Passenger Rail 
    Project.............................................         200,000

      Sec. 331 modifies the Senate provision that allows the 
Coast Guard Yard (Curtis Bay, MD) and other Coast Guard 
specialized facilities in fiscal year 2002 to qualify as 
components of the Department of Defense for competition and 
workload assignment purposes when providing support to the 
Department of Defense, and allows the Yard and other 
specialized facilities to enter into joint public-private 
partnerships and other cooperative arrangements for the 
performance of work which includes allowing the Coast Guard to 
pay and receive funds, materials, services and the use of 
facilities from such public and private entities. The Senate 
proposed to amend section 648 of title 14, United States Code, 
to include other Coast Guard specialized facilities designated 
by the Commandant and included Sec. 331 as a new subsection of 
section 648. The House contained no similar provision.
      Sec. 332 prohibits funds in this Act unless the Secretary 
of Transportation notifies the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations not less than three full business days before 
any discretionary grant award, letter of intent, or full 
funding grant agreement totaling $1,000,000 or more is 
announced by the department or its modal administration as 
proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Sec. 333 prohibits funds for design or construction of a 
light rail system in Houston, Texas, instead of prohibiting 
funds for planning, design, or construction of a light rail 
system in Houston, Texas, proposed by the House. The Senate 
proposed no similar provision. The conference agreement also 
includes a new provision to allow funds available in this Act 
for a Houston, Texas, metro advanced transit plan project to be 
available for obligation under certain conditions. The House 
and Senate proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 334 prohibits funds in this Act for engineering work 
related to an additional runway at New Orleans International 
Airport as proposed by the House. The Senate contained no 
similar provision.
      Sec. 335 prohibits funds in this Act to be used to adopt 
guidelines or regulations requiring airport sponsors to provide 
the Federal Aviation Administration ``without cost'' buildings, 
maintenance, or space for FAA services as proposed by both the 
House and Senate. The prohibition does not apply to 
negotiations between FAA and airport sponsors concerning 
``below market'' rates for such services or to grant assurances 
that require airport sponsors to provide land without cost to 
the FAA for air traffic control facilities.
      Sec. 336 includes the Senate provision that provides 
funds to administer motor carrier safety programs and motor 
carrier safety research by allowing the Secretary, as the 
Secretary determines necessary, to deduct a sum not to exceed 
two-fifths of 1 percent of all sums made available from the 
federal lands highways program, the surface transportation 
program, the congestion mitigation and air quality improvement 
program, the National Highway System, the interstate 
maintenance program, the bridge program, the Appalachian 
development highway system, and the minimum guarantee program. 
The House proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 337 includes the Senate provision that authorizes 
the Federal Aviation Administration to use funds from airport 
sponsors, including grants-in-aid for airports funds, for the 
hiring of additional staff or for obtaining services of 
consultants for the purpose of facilitating environmental 
activities related to airport projects that add critical 
airport capacity to the national air transportation system. The 
House proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 338 includes the Senate provision that prohibits 
funds in this Act to be used for developing a new regional 
airport for southeast Louisiana until a commission of 
stakeholders submits a comprehensive plan that is approved by 
the administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration and 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. The House 
proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 339 modifies the House and Senate provision that 
allows States to use highway safety program funds (section 402 
of title 23, United States Code) to produce and place highway 
safety service messages in television, radio, cinema, internet, 
and print media based on guidance issued by the Secretary of 
Transportation; and requires the States to report to the 
Secretary on the use of such funds for public service messages. 
Sec. 339 also modifies the Senate provision to require that 
$8,000,000 of the funds provided for innovative seat belt 
projects (section 157 of title 23, United States Code) be used 
by the States, as directed by the Secretary of Transportation, 
to purchase advertising to publicize the States' seat belt 
enforcement efforts during one or more of the Operation ABC 
national mobilizations; and requires that up to $2,000,000 of 
the funds provided for innovative seat belt projects be used by 
the Secretary to evaluate the effectiveness of State seat belt 
programs that purchase such advertising. The Senate proposed 
that $15,000,000 designated for innovative grant funds be used 
for national television and radio advertising to support the 
national law enforcement mobilizations conducted in all 50 
states aimed at increasing safety belt and child safety seat 
use and controlling drunk driving. The House proposed no 
similar proposal on funding.
      Sec. 340 amends item number 1348 in the table contained 
in section 1602 of Public Law 105-178 to include ``Construct 
Gastineau Channel Second Crossing to Douglas Island'' as 
proposed by the House. The Senate proposed to amend item 1348 
to include ``Second Douglas Island Crossing''.
      Sec. 341 prohibits funds for the Office of the Secretary 
of Transportation to approve assessments or reimbursable 
agreements pertaining to funds appropriated to the modal 
administrations in this Act, unless such assessments or 
agreements have completed the normal reprogramming process for 
Congressional notification as proposed by the House. The Senate 
proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 342 amends item 642 in the table contained in 
section 1602 of Public Law 105-178 to redesignate such project 
in Washington as the ``Passenger only ferry to serve Kitsap and 
King Counties to Seattle'' instead of ``passenger only ferry to 
serve Kitsap County-Seattle'' as proposed by both the House and 
Senate.
      Sec. 343 amends item 1793 in the table contained in 
section 1602 of Public Law 105-178 to redesignate such project 
in Washington as the ``Passenger only ferry to serve Kitsap and 
King Counties to Seattle'' instead of ``passenger only ferry to 
serve Kitsap County-Seattle'' as proposed by both the House and 
Senate.
      Sec. 344 amends item 576 in the table contained in 
section 1602 of Public Law 105-178 to allow for construction of 
the Missouri Center for Advanced Highway Safety as proposed by 
the House. The Senate proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 345 includes the House provision that designates the 
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority transit station 
located at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport as the 
``Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport Station'', and 
directs the transit authority to modify signs, maps, 
directories, documents and other records published by the 
authority to reflect the designation. The Senate proposed no 
similar provision.
      Sec. 346 prohibits funds in this Act to any person or 
entity convicted of violating the Buy American Act as proposed 
by the House. The Senate proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 347 modifies the Senate provision that allows 
discretionary bridge program funds in fiscal year 2002 to be 
used for historic covered bridges eligible for federal 
assistance under section 1224 of Public 105-178. The House 
proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 348 includes the Senate provision that prohibits 
funds for Coast Guard Acquisition, construction, and 
improvements after the fifteenth day of any quarter of any 
fiscal year unless the Commandant of the Coast Guard first 
submits a quarterly report to the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations on all major Coast Guard acquisition 
projects. The House proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 349 reduces transportation administrative service 
center funds by $5,000,000 instead of reducing funds by 
$37,000,000 and limiting fiscal year 2002 obligations to no 
more than $120,323,000 instead of limiting obligations to no 
more than $88,323,000 as proposed by the Senate. The House 
proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 350. The conference agreement modifies provisions 
proposed by the House and Senate regarding the safety of cross-
border trucking between the United States and Mexico. The House 
proposed to prohibit the use of funds for the processing of 
applications by Mexico-domiciled motor carriers to operate in 
the interior of the United States, beyond the commercial zones 
adjacent to the U.S.-Mexican border. The Senate proposed to 
condition the use of funds to process applications upon the 
certification by officials of the Department of Transportation 
that specific safety-related requirements had been met and upon 
promulgation in final form of related regulations. The 
conference agreement includes multiple provisions which, among 
other things:
      1. Require safety examinations by the DOT of all Mexican 
motor carriers before they are granted conditional operating 
authority. Fifty percent of all such examinations are to be 
conducted on-site, and on-site examinations are to cover at 
least fifty percent of carriers and 50 percent of estimated 
truck traffic in a given year. An exemption from the on-site 
requirement is provided for Mexican motor carriers with three 
or fewer commercial vehicles. However, such carriers may be 
subject to on-site examinations or reviews at the discretion of 
the DOT;
      2. Require a full safety compliance review--and a 
satisfactory rating resulting from that review--before any 
Mexican motor carrier can be granted permanent operating 
authority. Provisions that require on-site performance of 
safety examinations also apply to compliance reviews. Any 
carrier that has not received an on-site safety examination 
must undergo an on-site compliance review. The result of this 
provision is that every Mexican motor carrier operating four or 
more commercial vehicles and applying for cross-border 
authority, will be required to undergo at least one safety or 
compliance review conducted on-site at the carrier's place of 
business in Mexico before permanent operating authority is 
granted;
      3. Require Federal and State inspectors at the border to 
electronically verify the validity of driver's license of every 
driver carrying a placardable quantity of hazardous material, 
every driver undergoing a Level I safety inspection, and at 
least 50 percent of all other Mexican motor carrier drivers 
crossing the border;
      4. Require all Mexican motor carriers granted authority 
to operate in the United States to display a Commercial Vehicle 
Safety Alliance decal verifying satisfactory completion of a 
safety inspection. These vehicles must undergo safety 
inspections at least every 90 days in order to display such a 
decal. This requirement will no longer apply to a carrier once 
that carrier has operated for three consecutive years under 
permanent operating authority;
      5. Require that the 10 highest volume border crossings be 
equipped with weigh-in motion systems and that inspectors 
verify the weight of each Mexican motor carrier entering the 
United States. Of this total, 5 crossings shall be equipped 
before the border is opened and the remainder shall be equipped 
within 12 months of enactment of this Act;
      6. Require the Department of Transportation to issue 
interim final safety-related regulations and policies;
      7. Prohibit Mexican motor carriers from crossing into the 
United States at any border crossing where a certified motor 
carrier safety inspector is not on duty or where there is not 
adequate capacity to either conduct a sufficient number of 
meaningful vehicle safety inspections or accommodate vehicles 
placed out-of-service as a result of safety inspections;
      8. Prohibit vehicles that are owned or leased by a 
Mexican motor carrier, and that carry hazardous materials, to 
operate beyond the commercial zone, until the United States has 
completed an agreement with the government of Mexico to ensure 
that drivers of vehicles carrying a placardable quantity of 
hazardous materials meet substantially the same safety 
requirements as those met by U.S. driver;
      9. Prohibit any Mexican motor carrier from operating 
beyond the commercial zone until (1) the Department of 
Transportation Inspector General first conducts a comprehensive 
review of the DOT's ability to ensure safety on U.S. highways 
once Mexican motor carriers are allowed to operate within the 
internal U.S.; and (2) the Secretary of Transportation 
certifies in writing in a manner addressing the IG's findings 
that the opening of the border does not pose an unacceptable 
safety risk to the American public; and
      10. Require the DOT IG to conduct a follow up review at 
least 180 days following the first review cited above and then 
annually thereafter.
      The House proposed prohibiting funds in this Act to 
process applications by Mexico-domiciled motor carriers for 
conditional or permanent authority to operate beyond the United 
States municipalities and commercial zones adjacent to the 
United States-Mexico border. The Senate proposed prohibiting 
funds for the review or processing of an application by a 
Mexican motor carrier for authority to operate beyond United 
States municipalities and commercial zones on the United 
States-Mexico border until the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration performs full safety compliance reviews and 
inspections of Mexican motor carriers; and until the Department 
of Transportation Inspector General certifies in writing that 
certain criteria are met pertaining to fully trained 
inspectors, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, 
the information infrastructure of the Mexican government, 
border crossing capacity, and an accessible safety monitoring 
database.
      Sec. 351 includes the Senate provision that directs the 
Secretary of Transportation to include all public and private 
non-federal contributions made on or after January 1, 2000, for 
the regional transportation commission resort corridor fixed 
guideway project in Clark County, Nevada, to be used to meet 
the non-federal share requirement of any element or phase of 
the project. The House proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 352 modifies the Senate provision that requires the 
Secretary, in consultation with the Comptroller General of the 
United States, to conduct a study of the hazards and risks to 
public health and safety, the environment, and the economy 
associated with the transportation of hazardous and radioactive 
materials. The provision requires the study to be completed not 
later than six months after the date of the enactment of this 
Act. The conferees expect that radiopharmaceuticals and medical 
radionuclides should be exempt from this study. The House 
proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 353 modifies the Senate provision that directs the 
State of Georgia to give priority consideration to improving 
the Johnson Ferry Road, including the bridge over the 
Chattahoochee River, and to widening Abernathy Road with funds 
apportioned to the State of Georgia from revenue aligned budget 
authority by also directing the State of Alabama to give 
priority consideration to construction of the approaches to the 
Patton Island Bridge with funds apportioned to the State of 
Alabama from revenue aligned budget authority and for planning, 
design, engineering, and construction of an interchange on I-55 
at approximately mile marker 114 and connector roads in Madison 
County with funds apportioned to the State of Mississippi from 
revenue aligned budget authority. The House proposed no similar 
provisions.
      Sec. 354 includes the Senate provision that amends 
section 355(a) of the National Highway System Designation Act 
of 1995 to require certification by the Secretary that the 
states of New Hampshire and Maine have achieved a safety belt 
use rate of not less than 50 percent. The House proposed no 
similar provision.
      Sec. 355 includes the Senate provision that requires the 
Secretary of Transportation to conduct a study on the cost and 
benefits of constructing a third bridge across the Mississippi 
River in the Memphis, Tennessee, metropolitan area. The 
provision requires the study be submitted to the Congress not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act. 
The House proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 356 provides the sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of Transportation should not take any action that 
would diminish or revoke any exemption from certain 
restrictions on maximum driving time and on-duty time in effect 
on the date of the enactment of this Act for commercial motor 
vehicle drivers as proposed by the Senate. The House proposed 
no similar provision.
      Sec. 357 transfers the Point Retreat Light Station, 
including all property under lease as of June 1, 2000, to the 
Alaska Lighthouse Association, as authorized in Public Law 105-
383. The conferees note that the transfer is subject to 
conditions contained in that Act and furthermore expect that 
public access to the property for recreation, hunting, and 
fishing will be largely unchanged. The House proposed no 
similar provision.
      Sec. 358 modifies the Senate provision that directs the 
State of Minnesota to give priority consideration to the 
Southeast main and rail relocation project in Moorhead and to 
improving I-35 W at Lake Street in Minneapolis with funds 
apportioned to the State of Minnesota from revenue aligned 
budget authority. The House proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 359 directs the Secretary of Transportation to 
approve the use of National highway system and surface 
transportation program funds for construction of type II noise 
barriers in specific locations in the States of Georgia and 
Pennsylvania instead of solely in the State of Georgia as 
proposed by the Senate. The House proposed no similar 
provision.
      Sec. 360 allows funds provided in Public Law 106-346 to 
be available for the widening of U.S. 177 from SH-33 to 32nd 
Street in Stillwater, Oklahoma. The House and Senate proposed 
no similar provision.
      Sec. 361 amends section 3030(d)(3) of Public Law 105-178 
to authorize the Alabama State docks intermodal passenger and 
freight facility for bus and bus-related facilities funding. 
The House and Senate proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 362 amends section 1105(c) of Public Law 102-240 to 
include the Louisiana Highway 1 corridor from Grand Isle, 
Louisiana, along Louisiana Highway 1 to the intersection with 
United States Route 90 as a high priority corridor on the 
national highway system. The House and Senate proposed no 
similar provision.
      Sec. 363 amends item 425 in the table contained in 
section 1602 of Public Law 105-178 to extend and improve 
Louisiana Route 42 from and along U.S. 61 to I-10 in Ascension 
and East Baton Rouge Parishes in the State of Louisiana. The 
House and Senate proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 364 amends items 111 and 1583 in the table contained 
in section 1602 of Public Law 105-178 to include other areas in 
the city of Paducah and McCracken County, Kentucky. The House 
and Senate proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 365 amends section 1105(c)(3) of Public Law 102-240 
to clarify the Kentucky corridor by including the Louie B. Nunn 
Parkway as part of the Interstate 66 high priority corridor of 
the national highway system. The House and Senate proposed no 
similar provisions.
      Sec. 366 amends section 1105(c)(15) of Public Law 102-240 
to include the existing Purchase Parkway from the Tennessee 
state line to Interstate 24 in Kentucky as part of the 
Interstate 69 high priority corridor of the national highway 
system. The House and Senate proposed no similar provision.
      Sec. 367 amends section 1105(e)(5)(B)(i) of Public Law 
102-240 to designate the Purchase Parkway corridor as 
interstate route 69 and the Louie B. Nunn Parkway corridor as 
interstate route 66; and directs the Commonwealth of Kentucky 
to erect signs identifying such corridors as ``future'' 
interstates. The House and Senate proposed no similar 
provisions.
      Sec. 368 allows capital investment funds available to the 
Southern coalition for advanced transportation (SCAT) in Public 
Law 106-69 and Public Law 106-346 that remain unobligated to be 
transferred to the transit planning and research account for 
the electric transit vehicle institute in Tennessee. The House 
and Senate proposed no similar provisions.
      Sec. 369 makes technical amendments to Public Law 107-20 
to clarify the source of funding under federal-aid highways. 
The House and Senate proposed no similar provisions.
      Sec. 370 allows previously provided funds for the 
Riverside Expressway in Fairmont, West Virginia, to be used to 
carry out any project eligible under title 23, United States 
Code, in the vicinity of Fairmont, West Virginia. The House and 
Senate proposed no similar provisions.
      Sec. 371 amends item 71 in the table contained in section 
1602 of Public Law 105-178 to allow traffic safety and 
pedestrian improvements in downtown Miamisburg, Ohio. The House 
and Senate proposed no similar provisions.
      Sec. 372 amends item 258 in the table under the heading, 
``Capital investment grants'' of Public Law 106-69 to allow 
funds for the Marble Valley regional transit district buses. 
The House and Senate proposed no similar provisions.
      Sec. 373 amends item 73 in the table contained in section 
1106(b) of Public Law 102-240 to allow $5,700,000 of the funds 
provided for the Southtowns connector in Buffalo, New York, to 
be used for a parking facility for the Inner Harbor 
redevelopment project in Buffalo, New York. The House and 
Senate proposed no similar provisions.
      Sec. 374 amends item 630 of the table contained in 
section 1602 of Public Law 105-178 as amended by section 1102 
of chapter 11 of Public Law 106-554 to allow funds for the 
construction of a parking facility for the Inner Harbor/
redevelopment project in Buffalo, New York.
      The conference agreement includes under Title I, Federal 
Aviation Administration, Aviation insurance revolving fund, the 
provision that authorizes the Secretary of Transportation to 
make expenditures and investments related to aviation insurance 
activities under chapter 443 of title 49, United States Code as 
proposed by the Senate. The House proposed to include this 
provision under Title III.
      The conference agreement deletes the House provision that 
repeals section 232 of Appendix E of Public Law 106-113 that 
pertains to funding for the James A. Farley Post Office in New 
York.
      The conference agreement deletes the House provision that 
prohibits funds in this Act to propose or issue rules, 
regulations, decrees, or orders pertaining to the 
implementation of the Kyoto Protocol.
      The conference agreement deletes the House provision that 
prohibits funds in this Act for the planning, design, 
development, or construction of the California State Route 710 
freeway extension project through El Sereno, South Pasadena, 
and Pasadena, California.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that directs that the Commandant of the Coast Guard shall 
maintain an onboard staffing level at the Coast Guard Yard in 
Curtis Bay, Maryland, of not less than 530 full time equivalent 
civilian employees and provides that the Commandant may 
reconfigure his vessel maintenance schedule and new 
constructions projects to maximize Yard employment as proposed 
by the Senate.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that directs the Secretary of Transportation in cooperation 
with the administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration 
to encourage a locally developed and executed plan for 
modernizing O'Hare International Airport, addressing Northwest 
corridor traffic congestion, increasing commercial air service 
at Gary-Chicago Airport and Greater Rockford Airport, 
preserving and utilizing existing Chicago-area reliever and 
general aviation airports, and moving forward with a third 
Chicago-area airport. The provision also directs the Secretary 
and FAA administrator to work with Congress to enact a federal 
solution to address the aviation capacity crisis in the Chicago 
area, including northwest Indiana, if such a plan cannot be 
developed and executed.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that amends section 8335(a) of title 5, United States Code, to 
allow air traffic controllers in the civil service retirement 
system who face mandatory separation at age 56 to extend their 
service beyond age 56 to the earliest date eligible for either 
controller early retirement or for CSRS optional retirement, 
whichever comes first, unless the Secretary determines that 
such action would compromise safety. A similar provision was 
included in the Treasury and General Government Appropriations 
Act, 2002.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that amends section 1023(h) of Public Law 102-240 to allow all 
over-the-road buses to be exempted from federal axle weight 
restrictions that are presently applicable only to public 
transit buses.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that amends item 143 in the table under Capital Investment 
Grants of Public Law 105-277 and item 167 in the table under 
Capital Investment Grants of Public Law 106-69 to allow funds 
for Northern New Mexico park and ride facilities and State of 
New Mexico, buses and bus related facilities. These amendments 
were included in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2001.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that establishes new eligibility criteria, as proposed in the 
budget, for communities in the United States (except Alaska) to 
receive essential air service subsidies.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that requires up to $750,000 of the funds appropriated for the 
Federal Railroad Administration, Railroad research and 
development be expended to pay 25 percent of the total cost of 
a freight and passenger rail infrastructure study of the 
Baltimore, Maryland, area, and requires that the Norfolk-
Southern Corporation, the CSX Corporation, and the State of 
Maryland contribute a total amount of equal funding for this 
study. The conference agreement addresses the Baltimore, 
Maryland, freight and passenger rail infrastructure study under 
Title I, Federal Railroad Administration, Research and 
development account. The House proposed no similar provision.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that amends section 41703 of title 49, United States Code, to 
include a new section regarding the transfer of cargo at 
Anchorage International Airport. The conferees note that the 
Department of Transportation has not articulated a consistent 
strategy for achieving ``open skies'' through the current 
bilateral negotiating process or through multilateral 
negotiations. Accordingly, the conferees direct the department 
to assess the current state of international aviation 
negotiations and report by March 1, 2002, to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations regarding emerging 
multilateral or bilateral international aviation negotiating 
strategies, including whether those strategies should envision 
cargo transfer at domestic airports or cargo transfer rights 
for United States flag carriers at international airports. This 
report should include specific reference to air transportation 
issues in Alaska and other similarly situated airports in the 
United States, and address whether scheduled or anticipated 
bilateral or multilateral negotiations should address cargo 
transfer issues at United States airports. The report should 
also compare the cargo transfer regimes for similarly situated 
foreign airports engaged in air cargo carriage and transfer to 
the regimes in place for Alaskan and other similarly situated 
domestic airports in the United States.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that directs the Secretary of Transportation to give priority 
consideration to applications for airport improvement grants 
for Addison Airport, Addison, Texas; Pearson Airpark, 
Vancouver, Washington; Mobile Regional Airport, Mobile, 
Alabama; Marks Airport, Mississippi; Madison Airport, 
Mississippi; and Birmingham International Airport, Birmingham, 
Alabama. The conference agreement addresses airport improvement 
grants under Title I, Grants-in-aid for airports.
      The conference agreement deletes the Senate provision 
that amends section 5117(b)(3) of Public Law 105-178 regarding 
follow-on deployment of intelligent transportation 
infrastructure systems and specifies the follow on deployment 
areas in specific metropolitan areas. The House proposed no 
similar provision.
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                   conference total--with comparisons

      The total new budget (obligational) authority for the 
fiscal year 2002 recommended by the Committee of Conference, 
with comparisons to the fiscal year 2001 amount, the 2002 
budget estimates, and the House and Senate bills for 2002 
follow:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 2001...     $18,702,897
Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, fiscal 
    year 2002...........................................      17,163,605
House bill, fiscal year 2002............................      17,159,786
Senate bill, fiscal year 2002...........................      17,885,293
Conference agreement, fiscal year 2002..................      17,579,970
 Conference agreement compared with:
    New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 
      2001..............................................      -1,122,927
    Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, 
      fiscal year 2002..................................        +416,365
    House bill, fiscal year 2002........................        +420,184
    Senate bill, fiscal year 2002.......................        -305,323

                                   Harold Rogers,
                                   Frank R. Wolf,
                                   Tom DeLay,
                                   Sonny Callahan,
                                   Todd Tiahrt,
                                   Robert B. Aderholt,
                                   Kay Granger,
                                   Jo Ann Emerson
                                   John E. Sweeney,
                                   Bill Young,
                                   Martin Olav Sabo,
                                   John W. Olver,
                                   Ed Pastor,
                                   Carolyn C. Kilpatrick,
                                   Jose E. Serrano,
                                   James E. Clyburn,
                                   David R. Obey,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Patty Murray,
                                   Robert C. Byrd,
                                   Barbara A. Mikulski,
                                   Harry Reid,
                                   Herb Kohl,
                                   Richard J. Durbin,
                                   Patrick Leahy,
                                   Daniel Inouye,
                                   Richard C. Shelby,
                                   Christopher Bond,
                                   Robert F. Bennett,
                                   Ben Nighthorse Campbell,
                                   Kay Bailey Hutchison,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.