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BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, BUREAU OF INDIAN EDUCATION, AND INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS RESOLUTION, 2014
(House of Representatives - October 12, 2013)

Text of this article available as:
        


[Pages H6548-H6556]
BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, BUREAU OF INDIAN EDUCATION, AND INDIAN HEALTH 
           SERVICE CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS RESOLUTION, 2014

  Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 371, I call up 
the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 80) making continuing appropriations 
for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Bureau of Indian Education, and 
the Indian Health Service for fiscal year 2014, and for other purposes, 
and ask for its immediate consideration.
  The Clerk read the title of the joint resolution.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 371, the joint 
resolution is considered read.
  The text of the joint resolution is as follows:

                              H.J. Res. 80

       Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
     United States of America in Congress assembled, That the 
     following sums are hereby appropriated, out of any money in 
     the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and out of 
     applicable corporate or other revenues, receipts, and funds, 
     for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Bureau of Indian 
     Education, and the Indian Health Service, and for other 
     purposes, namely:
       Sec. 101. (a) Such amounts as may be necessary, at a rate 
     for operations as provided in the Full-Year Continuing 
     Appropriations Act, 2013 (division F of Public Law 113-6) and 
     under the authority and conditions provided in such Act, for 
     continuing projects or activities (including the costs of 
     direct loans and loan guarantees) that are not otherwise 
     specifically provided for in this joint resolution, that were 
     conducted in fiscal year 2013, and for which appropriations, 
     funds, or other authority were made available by such Act 
     under the following headings:
       (1) ``Department of the Interior--Bureau of Indian Affairs 
     and Bureau of Indian Education''.
       (2) ``Department of Health and Human Services--Indian 
     Health Service''.
       (b) The rate for operations provided by subsection (a) for 
     each account shall be calculated to reflect the full amount 
     of any reduction required in fiscal year 2013 pursuant to--
       (1) any provision of division G of the Consolidated and 
     Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 113-
     6), including section 3004; and
       (2) the Presidential sequestration order dated March 1, 
     2013, except as attributable to budget authority made 
     available by the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 
     (Public Law 113-2).
       Sec. 102.  Appropriations made by section 101 shall be 
     available to the extent and in the manner that would be 
     provided by the pertinent appropriations Act.

[[Page H6549]]

       Sec. 103.  Unless otherwise provided for in this joint 
     resolution or in the applicable appropriations Act for fiscal 
     year 2014, appropriations and funds made available and 
     authority granted pursuant to this joint resolution shall be 
     available until whichever of the following first occurs: (1) 
     the enactment into law of an appropriation for any project or 
     activity provided for in this joint resolution; (2) the 
     enactment into law of the applicable appropriations Act for 
     fiscal year 2014 without any provision for such project or 
     activity; or (3) December 15, 2013.
       Sec. 104.  Expenditures made pursuant to this joint 
     resolution shall be charged to the applicable appropriation, 
     fund, or authorization whenever a bill in which such 
     applicable appropriation, fund, or authorization is contained 
     is enacted into law.
       Sec. 105.  This joint resolution shall be implemented so 
     that only the most limited funding action of that permitted 
     in the joint resolution shall be taken in order to provide 
     for continuation of projects and activities.
       Sec. 106.  Amounts made available under section 101 for 
     civilian personnel compensation and benefits in each 
     department and agency may be apportioned up to the rate for 
     operations necessary to avoid furloughs within such 
     department or agency, consistent with the applicable 
     appropriations Act for fiscal year 2013, except that such 
     authority provided under this section shall not be used until 
     after the department or agency has taken all necessary 
     actions to reduce or defer non-personnel-related 
     administrative expenses.
       Sec. 107.  It is the sense of Congress that this joint 
     resolution may also be referred to as the ``American Indian 
     and Alaska Native, Health, Education, and Safety Act''.
        This joint resolution may be cited as the ``Bureau of 
     Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Education, and Indian Health 
     Service Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2014''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The joint resolution shall be debatable for 
40 minutes, equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking 
minority member of the Committee on Appropriations.
  The gentleman from Idaho (Mr. Simpson) and the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Moran) each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Idaho.


                             General Leave

  Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks 
and include extraneous material on H.J. Res. 80, and that I may include 
tabular material on the same.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Idaho?
  There was no objection.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. I have a parliamentary inquiry, Mr. Speaker.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Does the gentleman from Idaho yield to the 
gentlewoman for a parliamentary inquiry?
  Mr. SIMPSON. I yield for a parliamentary inquiry.

                              {time}  0945


                         Parliamentary Inquiry

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, is it in order to put the clean bill on 
the floor from the Senate to open the government?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman has not stated a proper 
parliamentary inquiry.
  The gentleman from Idaho is recognized.
  Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I rise today in support of this important legislation to continue 
funding for the Bureaus of Indian Affairs and Indian Education and for 
the Indian Health Service. This bill focuses on education, law 
enforcement, health care, and many other vital services to American 
Indians and Alaska Natives.
  Mr. Speaker, long ago, the Federal Government made treaty commitments 
to American Indians, who, in return, ceded the vast lands that make up 
the United States today. Visit just about any Indian reservation today, 
and you will quickly realize that the Federal Government hasn't even 
come close to living up to its end of the bargain.
  My colleagues on the subcommittee who are on both sides of the aisle 
and my predecessors before me, Mr. Moran and Mr. Dicks, who chaired 
this committee, have been working hard over the past several years to 
address the critical needs and challenges in Indian country. Even in 
declining budget environments, on a bipartisan basis, our committee 
continues to make funding for Indian country a priority. That is why I 
doubt my friends and colleagues on the other side of the aisle will 
oppose the merits of this bill. They might oppose the strategy of 
getting here, but they probably won't oppose the merits of the bill. It 
is something on which we agree on a bipartisan basis.
  For the past 11 days, the House has been attempting to reopen parts 
of the government without further delay and without trying to extract 
any further concessions from the Senate or the President.
  Mr. Speaker, you can't go wrong by trying to do the right thing. 
Right here, right now, those of us who care about Indian country have 
been given an opportunity to do the right thing. Let's not waste this 
opportunity by pointing fingers and arguing over everything other than 
the topic at hand. The topic at hand is Indian health, Indian education 
and the BIA. This is the hand we have been dealt. Let's do the right 
thing. I encourage my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support 
this resolution.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Here we go again. Each day, the gaping wound that the government 
shutdown represents grows bigger, and the House Republican response 
continues to be these little Band-Aids.
  Of course, we on the Democratic side want to see all Native American 
programs funded. The other side knows that. In fact, this has been one 
area in which we have achieved bipartisan agreement. Both Chairman 
Simpson--and I want to particularly mention Mr. Cole on our 
subcommittee--I, and Ms. McCollum have tried to put as much money as 
possible, given very severe fiscal constraints, into Native American 
programs; but this bill that is on the floor today, in fact, doesn't 
serve its stated purpose. We are going to hear from House Republicans 
as to what this latest Band-Aid temporarily funds, but here are just 
some of the Native American programs and offices that are not funded by 
this resolution:
  Native American education programs that are funded by the Department 
of Education; Native American law enforcement programs that are funded 
by the Department of Justice, including the programs to carry out the 
Violence Against Women Act. That is an area in which we had achieved, 
finally, bipartisan agreement. This doesn't allow us the funds to carry 
out that program. Native American social services programs that are so 
important to the American Indians, particularly on our reservations, 
are not funded by this bill. It includes child care and temporary 
assistance to needy families because they are funded by the Department 
of Health and Human Services. It includes Native American housing 
programs that are funded by the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development. HUD has the highest percentage--almost 100 percent--of its 
employees who are furloughed still.
  What is this--the 11th day, Mr. Speaker? That was a rhetorical 
question.
  While this resolution temporarily funds the Bureau of Indian Affairs 
and the Bureau of Indian Education, it fails to fund the Office of the 
Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs, which oversees those agencies. 
So we are not even willing to fund the office that is responsible for 
managing the programs that we purport to fund today.
  What about the Office of the Special Trustee, which administers $3.7 
billion in tribal funds and $728 million in individual Indian accounts? 
That is not funded either. So let's not be deluded that this is going 
to fix the situation with regard to our Native Americans. That is why a 
number of tribes have opposed this way of doing it. They want all of 
the government to open up because it is their government as well.
  Mr. Speaker, the underlying basis for the Republican shutdown of the 
government has been an irrational and intransigent opposition to the 
Affordable Care Act. That is how it started. House Republicans voted 43 
times to repeal the Affordable Care Act. At the same time, they were 
voting to repeal the permanent reauthorization of the Indian Health 
Care Improvement Act. Every time the other side voted to repeal the 
Affordable Care Act, they were voting to repeal the permanent 
reauthorization of the Indian Health Care Act as well as voting to 
repeal many new programs that are contained in the Affordable Care Act 
which are designed to assist the Indian Health Service in meeting its 
mission to raise the health

[[Page H6550]]

status of Native Americans. These 43 attempts to repeal the Affordable 
Care Act and the shutting down of government is all the more 
disheartening because we on the Subcommittee on Interior and 
Environment have so strongly supported Native American programs.
  Now, unlike what we have seen in the last week--that of certain 
Members who have marched the floor to claim support for the NIH and 
Head Start, all of which we strongly support--even as Members have 
pushed sequester and proposed additional cuts to these programs in 2014 
on the other side, this subcommittee has the bipartisan commitment to 
Native American programs. That is something we should be proud of.
  This subcommittee, I know, does not want to go about funding Native 
American programs in this manner. It is a halfhearted, Band-Aid 
approach. It is wrong. We need to fund all Native American programs. We 
need to fund all of the Federal Government. It is long past time for 
this shutdown to end, so let's release all of the Federal employees who 
have been taken hostage. Let's reopen the people's government.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. Speaker, it is now my pleasure to yield 3 minutes to 
the gentleman from Washington (Mr. Hastings), the chairman of the 
Natural Resources Committee.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in full support of this resolution to fund 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
  While House Republicans continue to offer solutions to end this 
government shutdown, we will continue also to take steps to provide 
funding for important areas of our government.
  This measure fulfills the Congress' unique responsibility to fund 
programs vital to Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. There are 56 
million acres of Indian trust lands in the United States. Unlike other 
privately owned lands, in most cases, Indian trust lands may not be 
leased for development purposes without the approval of the Secretary 
of the Interior. These lands are critical for Indian tribes to create 
jobs and to generate revenue for their reservation economies.
  For example, in my central Washington district, two tribes are major 
producers of timber that employ hundreds of people and produce income 
for tribal governments and thousands of individual members. In other 
parts of the country, tribes utilize their trust lands for oil, natural 
gas, coal development, and for a variety of business leasing and 
housing. It is critical to ensure continued funding for the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs to perform functions necessary for tribes and individual 
landowners to lease and develop their lands.
  The joint resolution additionally provides funding for the Indian 
Health Service programs. While direct care for acute and chronic health 
conditions is being provided as an essential government service to 
Native Americans during this shutdown, other services, such as 
preventative care, have been scaled back. It is critical that these be 
restored to normal operations.
  The President repeatedly stresses the importance of the United 
States' unique relationship with Indian tribes. He now has an 
opportunity, Mr. Speaker, to match his rhetoric with action by 
supporting the passage of this resolution and signing it into law.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, it is my great pleasure to now yield 2 
minutes to the gentlelady from New York, Nita Lowey, the ranking member 
of the full Appropriations Committee.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to the Republican 
shutdown.
  Of course, we support the funding for Indian Education and Health 
Services. Unfortunately, the House hasn't had the opportunity to 
approve the funding for these programs this year because the majority 
did not have the courage of their convictions to bring their FY14 
Interior and Environment or the Labor-HHS appropriations bills to the 
House floor. Don't for a moment think that today's bill fulfills their 
commitments to Native Americans. Under this bill, they will still not 
receive the funding they are due from the Department of Justice and the 
Department of Education.
  This is nothing more than a Republican ploy, and the claim that 
Democrats are not negotiating is absolutely false. House Republicans 
wrote a bill and sent it to the Senate. The Senate adopted the most 
important part of it, the funding level, and the President agreed to 
sign it even though Democrats wanted greater investments to support 
economic growth--jobs. The only thing Democrats oppose are the 
irresponsible efforts to put health care decisions back in the hands of 
insurance companies, which have nothing to do with keeping the 
government open. That is democracy. That is negotiation. We have done 
more than meet in the middle, but the Republicans now say ``no'' to 
their own bill.
  We could end this shutdown today if the majority would only support a 
reasonable solution to allow a vote on the Republican-written, Senate-
passed bill. Vote ``no.'' Demand a House vote to immediately end the 
reckless Republican shutdown.
  Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. Speaker, it is now my pleasure to yield 1\1/2\ 
minutes to the gentleman from Montana (Mr. Daines).
  Mr. DAINES. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of this resolution 
to appropriate funds for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Indian 
Health Service, and the Bureau of Indian Education because our Native 
Americans cannot sustain another day of this Washington gridlock.
  In my home State of Montana, we have seven Indian reservations and 
also the State-recognized Little Shell Tribe, and we are working right 
now to get Federal recognition for the Little Shell Tribe. Native 
Americans encompass 6 percent of Montana's population, but on our 
reservations, unemployment can rise as high as 50 percent.
  The Indian Health Service and the Bureaus of Indian Affairs and 
Indian Education can literally be lifelines for many. Earlier this 
year, when I visited the Salish Kootenai College, I learned about their 
slogan: ``Grounded in Tradition, Charging into the Future.'' Our 
reservations want to be self-sustaining, but without adequate health 
services, education, and economic opportunities, that goal is 
unattainable.
  I want our Native children to be able to thrive in my home State of 
Montana. That is why I support this resolution today.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I would like to inquire as to how much time 
remains for both sides in the debate.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Virginia has 12\1/2\ 
minutes remaining, and the gentleman from Idaho has 14\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. MORAN. At this time, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlelady from 
Minnesota, Ms. Betty McCollum, the chair of the Indian Caucus.

                              {time}  1000

  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to oppose this bill. As the 
Democratic cochair of the Native American Caucus, I am here to promote 
respect for tribal sovereignty, to fight for the needs of Native 
American families, and to call our Federal Government to uphold its 
trust and treaty obligations.
  Mr. Cole, my Republican cochair, Ranking Member Moran, and Mr. 
Simpson, the author of this legislation, share those very same goals; 
but I strongly believe that the bill before us today does not meet the 
needs of Indian Country; a broader solution is needed.
  The National Conference of American Indians has asked us to ``reopen 
government operations for all Federal agencies that meet trust and 
treaty obligations to tribal nations, and to stop the sequester of 
2014.''
  And I have heard that same message loud and clear from Minnesota 
tribal leaders. Mr. Speaker, when we consider Federal funding for 
tribal nations, we are talking about government-to-government 
relationships. This means the entire Federal Government needs to be 
open and functioning. Many services, as has been pointed out, that are 
vital to Indian Country are not funded within BIA or IHS. The 
Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Education, Justice, 
Transportation, and other agencies within HHS or Interior all have 
Native American accounts. Food distribution on Indian reservations is 
administered by the Department of Agriculture, and no funds are able to 
replenish food reserves that support 76,000 low-income Native American 
Indians each month.
  In Minnesota, winter is on its way, and tribal development housing 
has

[[Page H6551]]

been brought to a halt for the White Earth Nation because the Bureau of 
Land Management is closed. Mr. Speaker, I could list dozens of other 
important tribal partnerships and contracts that this bill will not 
reopen, and I have one example I am going to enter for the Record from 
the Oglala Sioux on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.
  To support tribal nations, we need to bring an end to this shutdown 
and vote on a clean funding bill for the entire government. I will vote 
``no'' on this bill.

       The Oglala Sioux Tribe issued a press release that the U.S. 
     Government shutdown is creating untenable economic conditions 
     for some of the poorest Indian tribes. The tribe, with its 
     45,000 membership and 3.1 million acre Pine Ridge Indian 
     Reservation located in southwestern South Dakota, stands to 
     suffer severe economic repercussions directly caused by the 
     shutdown of the United States Government. Federal funding for 
     critical tribal programs is inaccessible during the shutdown 
     which will force the Tribe to close programs and furlough 
     hundreds of tribal employees if Congress does not reopen the 
     United States Government. Over fifty percent of the Tribe's 
     programs will be affected. The USDA Food Distribution Program 
     will be terminated. The Suicide Prevention Program (SAMSHA 
     Department of Health and Human Services), the Homeless 
     Veterans Program (Department of Veteran Affairs), and the 
     Emergency Youth Shelter Program (Department of Interior) will 
     be suspended. Low-Income Home Energy Assistance and other 
     vital services will be cut off, which is especially 
     concerning given that tribal members, including elders, are 
     struggling with the aftermath of the blizzard.

  Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. Speaker, it is now my pleasure to yield 2 minutes to 
the gentleman from Alaska (Mr. Young).
  (Mr. YOUNG of Alaska asked and was given permission to revise and 
extend his remarks.)
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Speaker, my fellow colleagues, this is an 
important piece of legislation. When you vote against this legislation, 
you are voting against the first Americans. Every one of you in this 
room is an immigrant. We made a trust relationship with American 
Indians to take care of them, provide for them, and a trust 
relationship we should fulfill.
  You say this won't go anywhere. Very frankly, we should have done 
this a long time ago. We should set up a system because of the trust 
system that they are front-end loaded for their health care primarily. 
We have a system now that does not work. They have to hold their hand 
out and beg; and a lot of you on that side, all of you will say, Don't 
say too much. Take your blanket and your half a beef and go home and be 
quiet. No other minority would be treated that way. This health system 
has to be fixed. We have an opportunity to fix it now. We should fix it 
now.
  When people stand up and say, I support the American Indian, the 
first Americans, you are not really supporting them. You are paying lip 
service. You are paying lip service. That is all you have been doing 
for all these years ever since Columbus landed on these shores. And you 
broke treaty after treaty after treaty, both sides of the aisle. I have 
been under eight Presidents, and they pay lip service. They pay lip 
service.
  The President will have a big first American conference, the fifth 
one, and all they do is tell them again is, Be quiet. Take your blanket 
and half a beef and go home.
  For those who talk about the minority, this is the first minority. 
Yes, I get a little emotional about this because I have 10 American 
Native grandchildren. I have two beautiful American Native children 
that have given me those 10 grandchildren, and I had a wife that was, 
in fact, one of the first Americans, and I am proud to be associated 
with that. We should vote ``yes'' on this bill.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I agree with my good friend from Alaska on 
the unconscionable treatment that has been accorded our Native 
Americans, and I agree that there should be a unique commitment to our 
Native Americans.
  At this point I would like to yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Kildee).
  Mr. KILDEE. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for the time.
  Look, we all know what is happening here. If anybody believes that 
there is a true commitment to fully fund the promises that we have made 
to America's Native American tribes, you've got to be joking. Look at 
what is not funded in this legislation. It would be really simple to 
meet the promise that the gentleman spoke so eloquently about, and the 
way we would do that is to simply bring up a clean bill to reopen the 
entirety of government. Instead of picking and choosing which promises 
we will keep to America's Native American tribes, we would keep them 
all, instead of skipping the housing programs, the social service 
programs, and providing a talking point, but not meeting the obligation 
that this Congress has made to America's Native American tribes.
  If any community in this country understands broken promises, it is 
the Native American tribes of this country in this bill, this 
legislation. This continues the trail of broken promises.
  Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. Speaker, it is now my pleasure to yield such time as 
he may consume to the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Cole), a valued 
member of our subcommittee and probably the largest advocate for Indian 
issues in Congress.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I can agree with parts of what my friends have said, and parts I 
frankly can't agree with. I have worked in a bipartisan manner across 
the aisle and with the White House on Native American issues ever since 
I have gotten here, no matter who was on the other side of the aisle or 
who was in the White House. And I have to tell you, when you question 
the commitment of our side on Native American affairs, you clearly 
haven't looked at the record.
  Because of this chairman, Indian health expense is up 29 percent in 3 
years. Each year for the last 3 years, we have raised above what the 
administration requested in Native American spending, and that is a 
fact. And we did it, by the way, working in a bipartisan manner. I want 
to give my friend, Mr. Moran, and my friend, Betty McCollum, a lot of 
credit for those achievements, and I want to give our predecessor, Norm 
Dicks, who operated the same way, a lot of credit for that. This is a 
good-faith effort to do exactly what my friends suggest--make sure that 
critical programs in Indian Country are funded right now. I will 
continue to work in a bipartisan manner with my friends on these and 
other issues, but to suggest that they are being used as a pawn, no, 
for the first time they are just not being forgotten about because that 
is what tends to happen around here; and that has happened under 
Democrats and Republicans.
  So with that, I would urge the adoption and support. I want to thank 
my friend for being the leader in this House on funding Native American 
programs. He has done more than anybody in this country to improve the 
quality and the level of Federal services on that. He ought to be given 
the credit that he deserves. I want to thank my friend, Mr. Moran, for 
working with him every step of the way to accomplish those things. I 
saw them do it when their roles were reversed when he was the chairman 
and he was the ranking member. It is not an effort to divide. It is an 
effort, actually, to put something out that has united us in a 
bipartisan sense and to make sure that the first Americans aren't the 
last Americans anybody around here thinks about.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, this releases 1.5 percent of the Federal 
Government, leaving more than 99 percent of the Federal Government 
still closed.
  Mr. PALLONE. Mr. Speaker, the Republican position is clear. Either 
affordable health care for millions of Americans goes or we will keep 
the government shutdown. In an effort to avert the public's attention 
from this extreme and destructive hostage-taking, they have been 
putting forward a series of piecemeal, two month, sequestration level, 
funding bills.
  However, today's piecemeal bill reaches a new level of hypocrisy. The 
irony here would only be lost on a Republican Party as intransigent and 
dominated by the Tea Party as the one we have here in the House.
  The Affordable Care Act, which the Republicans are demanding be 
eliminated in exchange for allowing the government to reopen, includes 
the permanent reauthorization of the Indian Health Care Improvement 
Act. As the author of the reauthorization of Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act, I know the challenges that the reauthorization faced 
and just how long it took for us to finally get it into law--a decade, 
in case you are wondering.

[[Page H6552]]

  If we yield to Republican hostage-taking and throw out the Affordable 
Care Act, we throw out the reauthorization of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act. This will be devastating to Indian Country.
  Furthermore, this bill provides funding for a relatively small number 
of programs that support tribes. While not taking away from the 
importance of these programs, there are many more programs that go 
unfunded. To name just a few, this bill does not fund food distribution 
on Indian reservations, child nutrition programs, Fish and Wildlife 
Service support, and the Office of the Special Trustee for American 
Indians.
  This bill also continues the damaging sequester cuts that the 
National Congress of American Indians have said, ``pose particular 
hardship for Indian Country and the surrounding communities who rely on 
tribes as employers.'' But while I support repealing sequestration, the 
Democrats have done their part. We have said let's keep the government 
open while we negotiate and work out our differences.
  It is time for us to stop this nonsense. If you truly do believe in 
the sacred trust responsibility our government has to tribes, than 
let's have a vote on a clean CR and re-open the government.
  Mrs. KIRKPATRICK. Mr. Speaker, the tribal leaders in my district join 
me in calling for a vote on a clean funding bill to restart our 
government.
  Arizona's district one has 12 native American tribes. these families 
are suffering and our economy is taking a direct hit as a result of 
this irresponsible, unnecessary shutdown.
  House leaders have wasted precious time, offering nothing but a daily 
trickle of piecemeal bills that are going nowhere.
  These partisan games--and this lack of urgency--show a reckless 
disregard for the people, communities and economies hurt by this 
shutdown.
  Today, as house leadership puts forth yet another piecemeal bill that 
will go nowhere, I would like to share some comments from my district's 
tribal leaders:
  Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly said--quote--``The current 
piecemeal approach house republicans are using to fragment tribal 
communities from the rest of the country is insulting. Tribal 
communities, like the majority of Americans, want a comprehensive 
resolution.''
  And Peterson Zah, the former Navajo nation chairman and president 
said--quote--``Tribal issues should not be used as political props in 
this shutdown. Our kids, families and elders are all a part of the 
larger community, and we all suffer from a shutdown. We need the House 
to vote on a clean funding bill to reopen the entire government.''
  On the White Mountain Apache Nation, where I grew up, tribal chairman 
Ronnie Lupe said--quote--``Head start and impact aid are vitally 
important to tribes, but we also need the furloughed workers from BIA, 
Interior and all other agencies allowed back on the job. Our tribal 
members need their paychecks, our small businesses need their 
customers, and our veterans need their benefits without any lapses.''
  And from the Hopi Tribe, Vice Chairman Herman Honanie said--quote--
``Piecemeal bills are empty gestures that have no chance of passing 
both chambers and being signed into law. We need real action to reopen 
the entire government or we will continue to lose important resources 
like those from VAWA that help protect women and families.''
  Mr. Speaker, if House leadership were genuinely concerned about our 
native American tribes, then I suggest they listen to the tribes--and 
allow a vote to reopen the government.
  Congress should stop picking winners and losers. Stop playing games 
that only prolong the shutdown.
  House leadership could stop this shutdown right now.
  Let's vote on a clean funding bill to restart our government and 
protect our economy.
  Mr. BEN RAY LUJAN of New Mexico. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in 
opposition to this piecemeal approach to fund the government that fails 
to meet our trust responsibility to our Native American brothers and 
sisters.
  I wonder if they bothered to consult with tribes before bringing up a 
bill that cuts tribal programs even more than they have already been 
cut and locks in sequester cuts that are hurting tribes in my district 
and across the country.
  Mr. Speaker, it seems clear to me that Republicans are not listening 
to anyone these days, because if they were, they would know that tribes 
do not support this piecemeal course of action.
  Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly called this approach ``insulting'' 
and said Tribal Nations want a comprehensive resolution as well as an 
end to sequestration.
  By taking a piecemeal approach to fund our government, this bill 
fails to restore many critical services that are important to tribal 
communities.
  In fact, it makes the problems facing Indian Country worse, not 
better.
  Rather than vote on this piecemeal bill that is opposed by Native 
American communities, we should vote on a clean funding bill that opens 
the entire government, get to work ending sequestration, and fully fund 
tribal programs to meet our trust responsibilities.

 Navajo President Shelly Urges Lawmakers to Pass a Clean Spending Bill

       Shiprock, NM.--Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly strongly 
     urged the U.S. House of Representatives to pass a clean 
     spending measure that would stop the federal government 
     shutdown.
       The president said it must be done and that a continued 
     piecemeal approach is not right and is hurting the Navajo 
     people.
       ``The current piecemeal approach House Republicans are 
     using to fragment tribal communities from the rest of the 
     country is insulting. Tribal Nations, like the majority of 
     Americans want a comprehensive resolution,'' said President 
     Shelly.
       Meanwhile, the Bureau of Indian Affairs is furloughing 
     roughly a third of its workers, most of whom live in tribal 
     regions and serve Native people daily.
       ``Our funding for basic programs that provide support to 
     working families will soon dry up. And nearly 3,000 employees 
     who work on Indian Affairs for Interior will be furloughed. 
     We strongly urge GOP leaders to work with the true majority 
     in the House: the bipartisan group of lawmakers that stands 
     ready to restart the government. Allowing a vote on a clean 
     funding bill is the right way to help our tribes and our 
     communities move forward,'' President Shelly added.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to our very distinguished minority 
whip, the gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Hoyer), for the purposes of a 
unanimous consent request.
  Mr. HOYER. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring up the 
Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go to 
conference on a budget so that we end this Republican government 
shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under guidelines consistently issued by 
successive Speakers, as recorded in section 956 of the House Rules and 
Manual, the Chair is constrained not to entertain that request unless 
it has been cleared by the bipartisan floor and committee leaderships.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from New York (Ms. 
Velazquez) for the purpose of a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I ask unanimous consent that the House bring up the Senate amendment 
to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go to conference on a 
budget so that we can end this Republican government shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, the request 
cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to Mr. Al Green from Texas for the 
purpose of a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. AL GREEN of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I, too, ask unanimous consent 
that the House bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open 
the government and to go to conference on a budget so that we can end 
the Republican government shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from California 
(Ms. Hahn) for the purpose of a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. HAHN. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open this government and go 
to conference on a budget so that we can end this Republican government 
shutdown that is hurting so many American people.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Rhode Island 
(Mr. Cicilline) for the purpose of a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. CICILLINE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to House Joint Resolution 59, to open the 
government and go to conference on a budget so we can end this 
Republican shutdown now and get the American people back to work.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request

[[Page H6553]]

cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, at this time I yield to the gentleman from 
New York (Mr. Sean Patrick Maloney) for the purpose of a unanimous 
consent request.
  Mr. SEAN PATRICK MALONEY of New York. Mr. Speaker, in order to end 
this Republican shutdown today to get the people's government working 
for them again, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring up the 
Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59 and open the government without 
further delay.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Hinojosa) for the purpose of a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. HINOJOSA. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government 
and go to conference on a budget so that we end this Republican 
government shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlelady from New Hampshire 
(Ms. Kuster) for the purpose of a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. KUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go 
to conference on a budget so that we end this Republican government 
shutdown and give the American people the relief that they deserve.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. I now yield to the gentleman from New York (Mr. Serrano), 
a member of the Appropriations Committee, for the purpose of a 
unanimous consent request.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Chair would ask that any Member seeking 
recognition remove any communicative badge while making such request.
  Mr. SERRANO. You mean this sticker?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Yes.


                         Parliamentary Inquiry

  Mr. SERRANO. Parliamentary inquiry, Mr. Speaker.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman will state his parliamentary 
inquiry.
  Mr. SERRANO. We are allowed to bring posters and photographs and 
other items to the floor, why not this red, white, and blue sticker?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Communicative badges are not allowed to be 
worn while Members are under recognition.
  Mr. SERRANO. Well, then I will take it off, but it is with great pain 
that I do so.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring up the 
Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go to 
conference on a budget so that we end this Republican government 
shutdown now.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from California (Mr. 
McNerney) for the purpose of a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. McNERNEY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government 
and to go to conference on a budget so that we can end this Republican 
government shutdown and get our Nation back to work.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.

                              {time}  1015

  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Doggett) for a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. DOGGETT. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, instead of leaving for a 
3-day weekend, that we open the government, go to conference on a 
budget, and end this Republican government shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. DOGGETT. Mr. Speaker, Ms. Pelosi has already cleared it. Who is 
objecting? Who is not clearing it?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman is not recognized.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. 
Pocan) for a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. POCAN. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open up the government and 
go to conference on a budget so that we can end this Republican 
government shutdown that is costing the U.S. economy $160 million a 
day.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from California, 
Mrs. Susan Davis, a member of the Armed Services Committee, for a 
unanimous consent request.
  Mrs. DAVIS of California. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that 
the House bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the 
government and go to conference on a budget so that we end this 
Republican government shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. 
Jackson Lee) for a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, because many families today are not 
able to pay their mortgage, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government 
and go to conference on the budget so that we can end this Republican 
government shutdown hurting the children of America.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from Alabama, Ms. 
Terri Sewell.
  Ms. SEWELL of Alabama. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
House bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the 
government and go to conference on a budget so that we can end this 
Republican government shutdown now.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from Ohio (Mrs. 
Beatty) for a unanimous consent request
  Mrs. BEATTY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open government and 
go to conference on a budget so we can end this unnecessary Republican 
government shutdown that hurts veterans and children and American 
citizens. Let's open up the government now.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Florida, Judge 
Hastings, for a unanimous consent request.


                        Parliamentary Inquiries

  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I have a parliamentary inquiry.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman may state his parliamentary 
inquiry.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. What I would ask the Speaker to advise this 
Member of is as to the definition of ``appropriate clearance.''
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under guidelines consistently issued by 
successive Speakers, as recorded in section 956 of the House Rules and 
Manual, clearance must be given by the bipartisanship floor and 
committee leaderships.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Further parliamentary inquiry, Mr. Speaker.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman may state his parliamentary 
inquiry.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Does the Chair know, as Speaker, whether or

[[Page H6554]]

not such an attempt has been made and maybe denied with reference to 
the bipartisan clearance?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As indicated in section 956 of the House 
Rules and Manual, it is not a proper parliamentary inquiry to ask the 
Chair to indicate which side of the aisle has failed under the 
Speaker's guidelines to clear a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Speaker, further parliamentary inquiry.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman may state his parliamentary 
inquiry.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. The Chair is a Republican and I am a 
Democrat. I seek appropriate clearance from the Chair.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Chair has not received clearance from 
the appropriate parties.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Florida (Mr. 
Hastings) to complete his unanimous consent request.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that 
the House bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the 
government and go to conference on a budget so that we end this 
Republican shutdown, and that's with or without clearance.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the distinguished gentlelady from 
California (Ms. Bass) for a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. BASS. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go to 
conference on a budget so that we can end this Republican government 
shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from California (Mr. 
Honda) for a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go 
to conference on a budget so that we end this Republican government 
shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the vice chair of our Democratic 
Caucus, Mr. Crowley from New York, for a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. CROWLEY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government 
and go to conference on a budget so that we can end this Republican 
government shutdown. It is time to shut down the shutdown.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Vermont (Mr. 
Welch) for a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. WELCH. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open up the government and 
go to conference on a budget so we can end this Republican government 
shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from New Hampshire 
(Ms. Shea-Porter) for a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. SHEA-PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government 
and go to conference on a budget so that we end this Republican 
government shutdown and we allow the government to do the people's 
business again.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Veasey) for a unanimous consent request
  Mr. VEASEY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go 
to conference on a budget so that we end this Republican government 
shutdown now.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from California 
(Ms. Waters), the ranking member of our Financial Services Committee, 
for a unanimous consent request
  Ms. WATERS. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go 
to conference on a budget so that we can end this ridiculous Republican 
government shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.


                        Parliamentary Inquiries

  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I have a parliamentary inquiry.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman may state his parliamentary 
inquiry.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, the Chair has ruled that these 
unanimous consent requests cannot be entertained because they have not 
been pre-cleared. It is obvious the Democratic leadership supports 
these motions, and I wonder if it would be in order for the Republicans 
here and now to pre-clear these unanimous consent requests so that we 
can vote to reopen government?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As indicated in section 956 of the House 
Rules and Manual, it is not a proper parliamentary inquiry to ask the 
Chair to indicate which side of the aisle has failed under the 
Speaker's guidelines to clear a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, further parliamentary inquiry.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman may state his parliamentary 
inquiry.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, apparently the Chair cannot do 
it. Is it in order for me to ask the Republicans to pre-clear the 
unanimous consent request?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman is free to try to obtain 
clearance.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I yield to anybody on the 
Republican side at this time under my parliamentary inquiry to pre-
clear.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman may not yield while under 
recognition for parliamentary inquiry.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. 
Scott) for a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
House bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open up the 
government and go to conference on the budget so that we can end the 
Republican shutdown. Let the Record reflect that the Republicans have 
had an opportunity to pre-clear one of these unanimous consent 
requests.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from California 
(Ms. Roybal-Allard) for a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
House bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the 
government and go to conference on a budget so that we can end this 
Republican government shutdown today.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from California 
(Ms. Lofgren) for a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. LOFGREN. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government 
and go to conference on a budget so that we end this Republican 
government shutdown and stop holding the economy hostage.

[[Page H6555]]

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from California 
(Ms. Brownley) for a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. BROWNLEY of California. Mr. Speaker, our country is asking and I 
am asking unanimous consent that the House bring up the Senate 
amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open our government and go to conference 
on a budget so that we will end this Republican government shutdown now 
and get our government back to work for the American people.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from California (Mr. 
Takano) for a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. TAKANO. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go 
to conference on the budget so that we end this Republican shutdown 
now.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Massachusetts 
(Mr. Kennedy) for a unanimous consent request.

  Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government 
and go to conference on a budget so that we can end this Republican 
government shutdown today.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from New Mexico 
(Ms. Michelle Lujan Grisham) for a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM of New Mexico. Mr. Speaker, I join my 
colleagues today and ask unanimous consent that the House immediately 
bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government 
and go to conference on a budget so that we end the Republican shutdown 
immediately.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from California 
(Ms. Lee) for a unanimous consent request.
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
House bring up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the 
government and go to conference on a budget so that we can end this Tea 
Party Republican government shutdown and put people back to work.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. 
Walz) for a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. WALZ. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the American people's 
government and go to conference on a budget so that we end this 
Republican government shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from California (Mr. 
Ruiz) for a unanimous consent request.
  Mr. RUIZ. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to H.J. Res. 59, to open the government and go 
to conference on a budget so that we end this reckless and 
irresponsible government shutdown and do the right thing for the 
American people.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.

                              {time}  1030

  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I now yield for the purpose of a unanimous 
consent request to the dean of the New York delegation, Mr. Rangel.


                         Parliamentary Inquiry

  Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Speaker, may I make a parliamentary inquiry?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman may state his parliamentary 
inquiry.
  Mr. RANGEL. Under what circumstances could a senior Member of this 
august body protest the shutdown of government at this time?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman is not making a parliamentary 
inquiry.
  Mr. RANGEL. Well, I am asking from a parliamentary point of view. I 
don't want to violate the House rules, but as a Member of Congress 
representing 700,000 people, I feel that I have to scream out in 
protest as to what is happening to the country and my constituents. 
There has to be some way for me in a parliamentary way, without 
violating the House rules, to express myself.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Chair is following established 
guidelines for recognition of unanimous consent requests.
  Mr. RANGEL. With all due respect, that has nothing to do with my 
parliamentary inquiry, nothing at all. The rules for unanimous consent 
do not have anything to do with a parliamentary inquiry.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman is engaging in debate. Does 
the gentleman have a unanimous consent request?
  Mr. RANGEL. Are you saying that you are ignoring my parliamentary 
inquiry? I am just asking.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman has not made a proper 
parliamentary inquiry.
  Mr. RANGEL. That is how I started. I could ask the reporter, but I 
don't want to waste a lot of time on this weekend legislative session. 
I started asking permission to make a parliamentary inquiry, and that 
was granted.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman will suspend.
  Under guidelines consistently issued by successive Speakers, as 
recorded in section 956 of the House Rules and Manual, the Chair is 
constrained not to entertain the request unless it has been cleared by 
the bipartisan floor and committee leaderships.
  Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Speaker, I don't want to prolong this, but aren't you 
talking about a unanimous consent request?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Yes.
  Mr. RANGEL. Well, I am talking about a parliamentary inquiry. If you 
tell me I am out of order for making a parliamentary inquiry, I am not 
prepared to challenge the Chair, even though I truly believe that you 
and I know you will be incorrect.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman has not stated a proper 
parliamentary inquiry.
  Mr. RANGEL. Well, how do you state it properly? I ask: How could I 
properly state the feelings of my constituents as a member of this 
august body in a parliamentary way? What could be more parliamentary 
than that?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman may be yielded to for debate.
  The gentleman from Virginia is recognized.
  Mr. RANGEL. So the parliamentary inquiry is not going to be 
recognized?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized.
  Mr. RANGEL. Okay, I accept that.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, I had yielded to the gentleman from New York 
for a unanimous consent request, if the gentleman has a unanimous 
consent request.
  Mr. RANGEL. I ask unanimous consent that the Speaker and the 
Parliamentarian take a good look at the rules of this House so that 
Members can protest the closing down of the United States Government.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman has not made a proper request.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, at this time I would like to yield for the 
purpose of a unanimous consent request to the gentlelady from 
California (Mrs. Capps).
  Mrs. CAPPS. I thank my colleague for yielding.
  Honorable Speaker, I am pleased to join with my colleagues asking 
unanimous consent that this body in which we serve, the House of 
Representatives, bring up the Senate amendment to House Joint 
Resolution 59, to open the

[[Page H6556]]

government and go to conference on a budget so that we may end this 
Republican government shutdown.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair has previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Speaker, at this time I would like to yield to the 
gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Nolan) for the purpose of a unanimous 
consent request.
  Mr. NOLAN. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the House bring 
up the Senate amendment to House Joint Resolution 59 to open the 
government and to go to conference on a budget so that we can end this 
Republican government shutdown so hurtful and harmful to the American 
people.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. As the Chair previously advised, that 
request cannot be entertained absent appropriate clearance.
  Pursuant to clause 1(c) of rule XIX, further consideration of House 
Joint Resolution 80 is postponed.

                          ____________________




    

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