Amendment Text: H.Amdt.48 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (04/18/2013)

This Amendment appears on page H2132 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H2130-H2139]
             CYBER INTELLIGENCE SHARING AND PROTECTION ACT

  Mr. SESSIONS. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that during 
further consideration of H.R. 624 in the Committee of the Whole, 
pursuant to House Resolution 164, the last amendment in House Report 
113-41 be modified in the form that I have placed at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the modification.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 12, after line 18, insert the following:
       Page 4, line 18, strike ``Federal Government'' and insert 
     ``entities of the Department of Homeland Security and the 
     Department of Justice designated under paragraphs (1) and (2) 
     of section 2(b) of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and 
     Protection Act''.
       Page 5, line 5, strike ``Federal Government'' and insert 
     ``entities of the Department of Homeland Security and the 
     Department of Justice designated under paragraphs (1) and (2) 
     of section 2(b) of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and 
     Protection Act''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Texas?
  There was no objection.


                             General Leave

  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all 
Members have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and 
add extraneous material on the bill, H.R. 624.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Sessions). Is there objection to the 
request of the gentleman from Michigan?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 164 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the further consideration of the bill, 
H.R. 624.
  Will the gentleman from California (Mr. Denham) kindly take the 
chair.

                              {time}  1023


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 624) to provide for the sharing of certain cyber threat 
intelligence and cyber threat information between the intelligence 
community and cybersecurity entities, and for other purposes, with Mr. 
Denham (Acting Chair) in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose on Wednesday, 
April 17, 2013, amendment No. 4 printed in House Report 113-41 offered 
by the gentleman from Rhode Island (Mr. Langevin) had been disposed of.


                 Amendment No. 7 Offered by Ms. Sinema

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 7 
printed in House Report 113-41.
  Ms. SINEMA. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 17, line 17, insert ``Department of Homeland Security 
     and the Inspector General of the'' before ``Intelligence 
     Community''.

       Page 17, line 21, insert ``jointly and'' before 
     ``annually''.

       Page 17, line 22, strike ``congressional intelligence 
     committees'' and insert ``the Committee on Homeland Security 
     of the House of Representatives, the Committee on Homeland 
     Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, and the 
     congressional intelligence committees''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 164, the gentlewoman 
from Arizona (Ms. Sinema) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Arizona.
  Ms. SINEMA. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  My amendment is simple and straightforward. Currently, this bill, 
H.R. 624, requires the inspectors general of the intelligence 
community, Departments of Justice and Defense, as well as the Privacy 
and Civil Liberties Board to submit a report to Congress every year 
regarding the use of the information shared with the Federal 
Government. This amendment adds the inspector general of the Department 
of Homeland Security to the list of inspectors general that are 
required to submit the report.
  It also adds the House and Senate Committees on Homeland Security to 
the list of committees that will receive the report. Currently, only 
the House and Senate Intelligence Committee will receive the report. 
Having the Department of Homeland Security, a civilian department, 
included in this reporting requirement adds one more layer of 
accountability to this review and report.
  Allow me to briefly talk about the overall bill and why it has my 
support. I believe we need a 21st century solution for this 21st 
century problem. I've heard from businesses and constituents in Arizona 
who have firsthand knowledge of this issue. It's affecting both large 
corporations and small businesses alike. Our national security, our 
financial security, and our innovations are under very serious threat. 
This bill ensures that research and development, intellectual property, 
and software code is no longer being stolen by China, Iran, and Russia.
  Countries and cyber hackers steal trade secrets and they steal 
innovation and research, but they also steal American jobs. Americans 
are known for their ingenuity and hard work, but we are losing that 
hard work to hackers. One of the biggest cyber threats is to an 
American's personal information--information like bank accounts, health 
records, and Social Security numbers.
  This is very, very serious and a real threat to all Americans, and 
this threat is growing. Terrorist organizations have taken credit for 
taking down the online systems at Wells Fargo, JPMorgan Chase, and Bank 
of America. Three weeks ago, American Express also admitted that they 
were hacked.
  Cyber attacks are becoming more sophisticated. Instead of merely 
disrupting commerce and stealing information, the attacks are focused 
on destroying our Nation's digital systems, destroying our national 
security, our infrastructure and financial systems that Americans 
depend on every day. It is imperative that we partner with private 
companies to discover, and then prevent, more attacks such as these.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, while I do not oppose the 
amendment, I ask unanimous consent to control the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized or 5 
minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, I will support this amendment, and I want to thank the 
gentlelady from Arizona for her diligence and work in coming down to 
the briefings and getting well educated on the threat and familiarizing 
herself with the classified material. Thank you for your extra work on 
this issue, and thank you for being a strong voice in advocating our 
solution.
  This amendment is important. It adds the inspector general at the 
Department of Homeland Security to the list of entities responsible for 
creating an annual report reviewing the use of information shared with 
the Federal Government. The amendment also adds the congressional 
Homeland Security Committee to the recipients of the report. This adds 
one more layer of oversight to make sure our civil liberties and 
privacy are protected in the bill.

[[Page H2131]]

  I stand in support and appreciate all the efforts of the gentlelady 
from Arizona, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. SINEMA. Mr. Chair, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman has 2\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Ms. SINEMA. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Maffei).
  Mr. MAFFEI. I thank the gentlelady from Arizona for offering this 
amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today to speak in support of the Cyber Intelligence 
Sharing and Protection Act. I opposed the PATRIOT Act because many of 
its elements I did feel violated civil liberties and allowed things 
like profiling and abusive wiretapping; and while I don't think this 
was an easy decision, I do feel that this is certainly a different 
case.
  Every day international agents, terrorists, and criminal 
organizations attack the public and private networks of the United 
States, as we speak. They disrupt services, attack newspapers and 
banks, infiltrate government agencies. They can steal intellectual 
property, and most alarmingly, they access private information of 
millions of citizens.

                              {time}  1030

  We've already seen state actors like the People's Republic of China 
pursue widespread data theft from American computer networks. 
Intelligence experts believe that rogue nations like Iran and even 
independent groups like WikiLeaks are pursuing very aggressive measures 
to hack into our Nation's power grid, our air traffic control systems, 
and individuals' personal financial records and other sorts of records 
across the country; and I do believe we should be very concerned. So 
while I do have some concern that the U.S. Government may access our 
private information in the cybersphere, I am more concerned that the 
Chinese Government will access our private information. This is a clear 
and present danger.
  This bill does have protections that strictly prohibit the Federal 
Government from using or retaining any information other than for cyber 
threat purposes. And it remains illegal, after this bill is passed, for 
a company to share its information, except for cybersecurity reasons. 
This amendment will help to further enforce that.
  We must recognize that cybersecurity threats are real and constantly 
changing. This bill is an important measure that allows private 
companies to share the cyber threat information with the Federal 
Government to help protect critical networks and infrastructure from 
attack.
  I support this bill. It is an important step in our United States 
security strategy to protect our country from emerging cyber threats at 
home and abroad. And I support this amendment.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he might 
consume to the gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Ruppersberger).
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. I thank the chairman for yielding.
  First thing, to the Congresswoman from Arizona, I really appreciate 
all of your work on this bill. You came to Congress; you did your 
homework; you decided that it was important to protect our country; and 
you've done a lot of work. I just want to let you know that you've done 
a great job for your district and for America, generally, and I want to 
thank you for that.
  Basically, this amendment really allows the Committee on Homeland 
Security and the Inspector General to oversee and to do reporting. It's 
important that we have oversight. I know the chairman and I have worked 
hard to make sure that we deal with all of the privacy issues, and this 
is just another example of how we're going to protect our privacy. You 
cannot have security if you don't have privacy.
  Ms. SINEMA. Mr. Chairman, I just want to emphasize again that this 
amendment helps add another layer of accountability. It includes the 
Homeland Security Department as a civilian interface for Congress in 
both the Homeland Security Committee and the Intelligence Committee.
  I want to thank, in particular, the chair and the ranking member for 
their leadership on this issue over the course of several years. I know 
in my district it's important not just to consumers, but also to 
industry leaders who are leading the way forward on American 
innovation. I want to thank them for that.
  I encourage Members to support this amendment, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. I yield back the balance of my time, Mr. 
Chairman.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Arizona (Ms. Sinema).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. SINEMA. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Arizona 
will be postponed.


    Amendment No. 8, as Modified, Offered by Ms. Loretta Sanchez of 
                               California

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 
printed in House Report 113-41.
  Ms. LORETTA SANCHEZ of California. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment 
at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 18, beginning on line 24, strike ``Director of 
     National Intelligence and'' and insert ``Director of National 
     Intelligence,''.
       Page 19, line 1, insert ``and the Privacy Officer and the 
     Officer for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties of the 
     Department of Homeland,'' after ``Justice,''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 164, the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Loretta Sanchez) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.
  Ms. LORETTA SANCHEZ of California. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such 
time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chairman, the challenge of defending our Nation on a constantly 
expanding cyber front continues to grow. I believe that I'm one of 
those Members of the Congress that sits both on the House Armed 
Services Committee and on the Homeland Security Committee and I see it 
from both angles, both from the civilian side and the military side.
  I've constantly tried to improve how we address the need for the 
next-generation technology, public-private cooperation, and ensuring 
that we have the right personnel to counter this 21st-century cyber 
threat. However, I am uncompromising in safeguarding the rights of our 
citizens, and I will never sacrifice our civil liberties for unneeded 
intrusion.
  To this end, the amendment I am offering today would strengthen 
existing provisions in the bill to include the Privacy Officer and the 
Officer for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties of the Department of 
Homeland Security as key stakeholders in the report that would assess 
the impact activity caused by this legislation.
  This report would assess how this legislation affected our civil 
liberties and privacy throughout our Federal Government. The Department 
of Homeland Security is ``the'' key civil Department in our Federal 
Government that develops and implements cybersecurity protocols for the 
rest of the Federal Government. It's crucial that they be part of any 
civil liberty and privacy assessment.
  I have worked closely with both the Privacy Office and the Office of 
Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. The individuals in these offices are 
experts in their fields and they should have a say; they should be in 
the room as we take a look at this.
  Much work needs to be done, but I urge my colleagues to support my 
amendment to continue improving this bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, while I do not oppose the 
amendment, I ask unanimous consent to control the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, I will support this amendment; 
and I want to thank the gentlelady for her work and interest on this 
very,

[[Page H2132]]

very important issue and her taking the time to be involved in the 
process of making this a better bill and protecting privacy and civil 
liberties.
  What this bill does is add a Privacy Officer and Officer of Civil 
Rights and Civil Liberties of the Department of Homeland Security to 
the list of entities responsible for producing an annual report 
assessing the privacy and civil liberties impact of activities 
conducted by the Federal Government under this bill.
  Because the bill requires the Senior Privacy and Civil Liberties 
Officer of each department or agency receiving information under the 
bill to participate in the report, I will not oppose this effort to 
specifically include these officials from the Department of Homeland 
Security.
  I think this is, again, making more clarification, making our privacy 
and civil liberties protection that much more robust in the bill, and I 
want to thank the gentlelady for her efforts.
  With that, Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. LORETTA SANCHEZ of California. Mr. Chairman, I thank the kind 
chairman for his remarks and his support.
  Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent that the amendment be modified 
with the modification that is at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the modification.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Insert ``Security'' after ``Homeland'' in the second 
     instruction.

  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from California?
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The amendment is so modified.
  Ms. LORETTA SANCHEZ of California. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to 
my good friend, the gentleman from California (Mr. McNerney).
  Mr. McNERNEY. I thank my colleague from California, and I rise in 
support of Ms. Sanchez's amendment, but in opposition to the underlying 
bill, H.R. 624.
  This legislation has positive aspects, but I'm concerned with the 
civil protections not required in H.R. 624. Ms. Sanchez's amendment is 
a necessary step toward improving the bill by giving oversight 
authority to a civilian agency.
  Sharing information is absolutely essential; however, in exchange for 
the liabilities protections given to businesses that share cyber threat 
information with the government, it is our responsibility here in 
Congress to protect our constituents' private information. Businesses 
should be required to remove personally identifiable information before 
submitting data to Federal agencies.
  I thank Ms. Sanchez again for her efforts, as well as Mr. Rogers and 
Mr. Ruppersberger for their efforts as leaders of the Intelligence 
Committee.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. I would thank the gentlelady again and yield 
back the balance of my time.
  Ms. LORETTA SANCHEZ of California. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment, as modified, 
offered by the gentlewoman from California (Ms. Loretta Sanchez).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mr. LaMalfa

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 
printed in House Report 113-41.
  Mr. LaMALFA Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk made in 
order under the rule.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 22, after line 7 insert the following:
       ``(7) Limitation on surveillance.--Nothing in this section 
     shall be construed to authorize the Department of Defense or 
     the National Security Agency or any other element of the 
     intelligence community to target a United States person for 
     surveillance.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 164, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. LaMalfa) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.

                              {time}  1040

  Mr. LaMALFA. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, I appreciate the opportunity to rise today and speak in 
favor of my amendment to the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection 
Act. This is an example of the process working. A lot of folks have 
expressed concerns about the measure here, not only on the cyber 
intelligence side but as well the privacy and personal security side. I 
think this amendment and many others that we have seen today, and will 
see, are addressing that issue so we get the right balance between 
cybersecurity and individual liberties and freedoms, Fourth Amendment 
concerns.
  The threat we face today in the cyber realm is nothing short of a 
serious threat to our national security. Nation-states like China and 
Russia are targeting the American government and the American private 
sector alike for cyber espionage, and potentially for cyber attack.
  Chinese espionage targeting the American private sector to steal core 
research and development information--at the very heart of American 
innovations and jobs--represents an unprecedented threat to our very 
way of life.
  While strongly supporting this legislation, I am pleased to have 
worked with Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member Ruppersberger to further 
clarify that nothing in the legislation should be construed to be a 
surveillance program directed at American citizens.
  The amendment is very concise yet extremely important. Titled the 
``Limitation on Surveillance,'' it simply reads as follows:

       Nothing in this section shall be construed to authorize the 
     Department of Defense or the National Security Agency or any 
     other element of the intelligence community to target a 
     United States person for surveillance.

  As we act to protect the United States from cyber attack by foreign 
countries and terrorist groups, we must ensure that our constitutional 
rights and privacy are maintained. The term ``United States person'' 
includes U.S. citizens and legal residents or legal visitors to the 
country, limiting the surveillance powers of this bill to foreign 
nationals and those entering the Nation illegally.
  This amendment helps to strike the balance this measure strives for, 
granting our government the means to defend the Nation while, 
importantly, preventing any inappropriate use of these powers.
  Again, I am pleased to support legislation that creates no new 
regulatory regime and does not create additional Federal bureaucracy or 
require significant additional spending.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. Mr. Chair, I rise to claim time in opposition, 
even though I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Maryland is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. Mr. Chair, while we never believe that any 
surveillance of Americans was permitted under our bill, we are taking 
any and all precautions to make it entirely clear that no element of 
the intelligence community--which, of course, includes the Department 
of Defense and the National Security Agency--is authorized to target 
any United States person for surveillance. The chairman's amendment 
solidifies the privacy and civil liberties protections that we always 
have intended to have as part of the bill. No American activities or 
communications will be targeted--period. We cannot have security 
without privacy.

  Therefore, I urge a ``yes'' vote on this amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. LaMALFA It is my pleasure to now yield 1 minute to the chairman 
of the Intel Committee, the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Rogers).
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chair, I support this amendment, which 
makes very, very clear that nothing in this bill authorizes the 
government to target an American citizen for surveillance. It's 
incredibly important.
  Though the underlying bill would not allow the surveillance of an 
American citizen under CISPA, I will support this amendment as a 
further clarification that settles some Members' concerns and ensures 
the scope of the bill stays as narrow as we intended it to be.

[[Page H2133]]

  The amendment is an important myth buster about the intentions of 
CISPA. I commend Mr. LaMalfa for his leadership on this issue and urge 
strong support for the LaMalfa amendment.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. I would like to yield to the gentleman from 
Virginia, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, Congressman 
Goodlatte, as much time as he may consume. And I would also like to 
thank him personally for working closely with us on this bill to have a 
bill that will protect the citizens of the United States of America.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. I thank the gentleman from Maryland, the ranking 
member, for not only yielding me this time, but also for the great work 
that he has done, and also the great work that Chairman Rogers has 
done. They have worked together in a bipartisan fashion to accomplish 
something very, very important to accomplish in terms of fighting cyber 
terrorism, cyber crime, and making sure that we are safe in this 
country from cyber attacks to which we are very vulnerable today.
  I also want to thank the gentleman from California for his amendment. 
I support efforts to make it absolutely clear that this legislation 
does not in any way authorize the surveillance of American citizens.
  I also want to thank Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member Ruppersberger 
for working with me to enhance the liability provisions in the 
legislation, for working with me to address some jurisdictional issues 
in the bill that affected the Department of Justice and the House 
Judiciary Committee.
  I would also like to note that the President's statement in 
opposition to this bill insists on exposing our best technology 
providers to even more lawsuits when they are simply helping to defend 
our Nation against cyber attacks. The President's opposition statement 
expresses a deep distrust of private industry that America has rejected 
since its founding.
  The bill before us today instead welcomes the private sector and 
acknowledges that we need the best minds in the country to help protect 
our citizens from ever-evolving cyber attacks by the likes of China and 
Iran. And the work done by the chairman and the ranking member to 
improve the provision of this bill, working with my committee and my 
staff to make it clear that we have a definite definition of what 
constitutes good faith and what constitutes circumstances under which a 
business that does not act in good faith would be exposed to lawsuits 
and liability, is one that helps protect the privacy of American 
citizens, because those citizens will be assured they will know under 
what circumstances a business has exceeded its authority under the law 
and be protected and have a clear right to bring an action under those 
circumstances. And the businesses themselves will be protected because 
they will not share information if they know they are not acting in 
good faith, because they know what the definition of good faith is in 
the bill.
  So the gentleman from Michigan, the gentleman from Maryland, the 
chairman and ranking member, have done a great job with this 
legislation. I support their efforts and urge my colleagues to do the 
same.
  Mr. LaMALFA Mr. Chair, again, thank you to my colleagues. The ranking 
member from Maryland (Mr. Ruppersberger), I really appreciate your kind 
words and your strong support. To my colleague from Virginia, thank you 
for your kind words on the amendment as well. And to my colleague, Mr. 
Chairman, Mr. Rogers from Michigan, thank you for letting me offer this 
amendment here.
  It does strike the balance I think we need with cybersecurity. The 
great threat to many of our institutions in this Nation is something 
that we do have to act upon, but also finding that balance with 
personal privacy that is so key to the elements of the founding of our 
Nation. I'm proud to be able to carry this amendment. I ask for your 
support, Mr. Chairman, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. LaMalfa).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.

                              {time}  1050


                Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mr. Paulsen

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 
printed in House Report 113-41.
  Mr. PAULSEN. I offer an amendment, Mr. Chair.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill, add the following new section:

     SEC. 4. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION.

       It is the sense of Congress that international cooperation 
     with regard to cybersecurity should be encouraged wherever 
     possible under this Act and the amendments made by this Act.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 164, the gentleman 
from Minnesota (Mr. Paulsen) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Minnesota.
  Mr. PAULSEN. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, last month at a Senate hearing outlining the threats 
facing our security, it was the Director of National Intelligence, 
James Clapper, who warned that the intelligence community is seeing 
indications that some terror groups are interested in ``developing 
offensive cyber capabilities, and cyber criminals are using a growing 
black market to sell cyber tools that fall into the hands of both state 
and nonstate actors.''
  Mr. Chair, just last week in Chairman Rogers' committee, it was 
Director Clapper who also said, ``As more and more state and nonstate 
actors gain cyber expertise, its importance and reach as a global 
threat cannot be overstated.''
  Our society has increasingly become reliant on modern technology in 
nearly every aspect of our daily lives, making the possibility of a 
cyber attack that much more dangerous. Under cyber terrorist or cyber 
crime, industries as diverse as financial systems, transportation, 
social media, and even utilities could be negatively impacted. A 
successful attack could disrupt the lives of Americans and result in 
other unpredictable consequences.
  We do know the threat is real. We've already experienced attacks on 
our Nation's financial institutions and have faced hackers trying to 
gain access to the Pentagon and our Nation's critical infrastructure. 
According to the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the number of 
U.S. organizations believed to have been hacked has dramatically 
increased in just the last 6 years. Back in 2006, there were about 
5,500 separate attacks noted, compared to 48,500 in 2012. As a January 
2013 U.S. Government report found, cyber attacks and intrusions in 
critical energy infrastructures rose 52 percent between 2011 and 2012 
alone. That's in a 1-year period, Mr. Chair.
  Cyber weapons will likely continue to be used by a greater number of 
countries and other actors as a form of warfare. Between 20 and 30 
states already have the capability to launch cyber warfare, including 
China, Russia, Iran, and North Korea and others, as has been stated as 
part of the debate on this bill.
  Fortunately, these attacks have so far been thwarted by our 
intelligence before significant and lasting damage could occur, but it 
would be unwise to choose to act alone in the face of the growing fact 
of cyber criminality. In order to produce effective outcomes, our 
intelligence community must continue to promote collaboration among 
experts and across boards.
  Just as we conduct our drills and our training exercises with our 
allies, we need to work together to share our best practices to keep 
our citizens safe from cyber attacks. My amendment would call on 
Congress to encourage international cooperation when it comes to 
cybersecurity.
  This amendment would not bind the United States to working with other

[[Page H2134]]

nations, but it simply does promote doing so in situations that would 
be mutually beneficial. Such collaboration would more effectively allow 
us to combat cyber terrorism and threats by sharing resources and using 
proven security techniques when possible.
  Mr. Chair, in the end, by working together on an issue that poses a 
threat to all of us, the international community will benefit from the 
exchange of experiences and potential solutions.
  Mr. Chair, I just want to thank the gentleman from Michigan and the 
gentleman from Maryland for their leadership on this very challenging 
issue. I know that looking forward we will continue to see success in 
battling these real threats.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. I rise to claim the time in opposition to this 
amendment even though I'm not opposed.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Maryland is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. I thank Congressman Paulsen for his work on this 
bill. I support his amendment with the sense of Congress to encourage 
international cooperation with regard to cybersecurity whenever 
possible under this bill.
  Given that cyber threats are global in nature, as are our networks 
and computer systems, international efforts must work together to 
protect against domestic and foreign actors who seek to destroy our 
industries, government, agencies, and utilities.
  Therefore, I urge a ``yes'' vote on the amendment, and I yield back 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. PAULSEN. Mr. Chair, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
committee chairman.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, I support this amendment and 
agree that we must employ international cooperation to combat the 
scourge of economic cyber espionage and leverage our official state 
relationships and alliances to help stop the bleeding.
  China's economic espionage has reached an intolerable level, and I 
believe U.S. officials should demand that it stop at every meeting and 
engagement we have with Chinese officials. Moreover, the United States 
and our allies in Europe and Asia have an obligation to confront 
Beijing and demand they put a stop to this piracy.
  Beijing is waging a massive trade war on us all, and we should band 
together to pressure them to stop. Combined, the United States and our 
allies in Europe and Asia have significant diplomatic and economic 
leverage over China, and we should use this to our advantage to put an 
end to this activity.
  I commend the gentleman from Minnesota for offering this amendment, 
and I urge my colleagues' strong support for it.
  Mr. PAULSEN. Mr. Chair, I urge support for my amendment, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Paulsen).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Barton

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 11 
printed in House Report 113-41.
  Mr. BARTON. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill, add the following new section:

     SEC. 4. RULE OF CONSTRUCTION RELATING TO CONSUMER DATA.

       Nothing in this Act or the amendments made by this Act 
     shall be construed to provide new or alter any existing 
     authority for an entity to sell personal information of a 
     consumer to another entity for marketing purposes.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 164, the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Barton) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas.
  Mr. BARTON. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  (Mr. BARTON asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. BARTON. Mr. Chair, when this same bill or bill similar to it was 
on the House floor last year, I had to reluctantly rise in opposition 
to it because it was my opinion that the privacy protections in the 
bill were not sufficient to protect the privacy of the American people. 
I think that surprised a lot of people that I was not for the bill.
  After the bill failed to move in the Senate, I went to Chairman 
Rogers and I told him that I supported the underlying intent of the 
bill and I was hopeful that, if the bill came back up in this session, 
he and myself and our staffs could work together to improve the privacy 
protections. He promised then that he would do it, and Chairman Rogers 
and his staff have been men and women of their word. The result is a 
bill that was reported out of the Intelligence Committee on a 
bipartisan basis with much stronger privacy protections.
  When I went to the Rules Committee, Chairman Rogers supported that 
this amendment I'm about to offer should be made in order, and it has 
been. And if this amendment is accepted--and I'm told that the chairman 
and the ranking member are going to support it, as I'm not aware of any 
organized opposition to it--it is going to be my intent to vote for the 
bill.
  We obviously have a cyber threat that faces the American people, and 
Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member Ruppersberger have talked about that 
in some detail earlier in this debate. We want to combat that threat. 
But in doing it, we do not want to eliminate or weaken the privacy 
protections of the American people that we represent in this body.
  So what my amendment does is make sure that any information that is 
collected is going to be used simply for the purpose of protecting 
against cyber threats. It's a very short amendment. It adds a new 
section to the bill, section 4. Here I will read the amendment since 
it's in clear English and very short.

       Nothing in this act or the amendments made by this act 
     shall be construed to provide new or alter any existing 
     authority for an entity to sell personal information of a 
     consumer to another entity for marketing purposes.

  What this does, Mr. Chair, is simply nail down the fact that when we 
find information that might be necessary to protect against a cyber 
threat, that's all it's going to be used for. It can't be used for any 
other purpose.
  As I said earlier, Chairman Rogers has worked very closely with 
myself, and his staff has worked with my staff. Congressman Markey of 
Massachusetts, who is the cochairman of the Privacy Caucus, strongly 
supports this amendment.
  Again, I think it was unanimously accepted at the Rules Committee. 
I'm aware of no opposition, so I hope that we can adopt the amendment.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1100

  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. I rise to claim the time in opposition even though 
I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Maryland is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. First, I would like to thank Congressman Barton 
for his work on the bill.
  You've made the bill stronger, and we want to make sure that there is 
no perception that people's privacies are being violated.
  I support Congressman Barton's amendment, which ensures that nothing 
in our bill, CISPA, provides the authority for any entity to sell a 
consumer's personal information for marketing purposes.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BARTON. I yield such time as he may consume to the distinguished 
chairman of the Intelligence Committee and also a distinguished member 
of the Energy and Commerce Committee, a former FBI agent, the gentleman 
from Michigan (Mr. Rogers).
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Thank you, Mr. Barton, for your work on this.
  Last year, you expressed strong reservations about certain privacy 
protections, and you were willing to sit down and work with us to try 
to find and make sure that we sent that very clear

[[Page H2135]]

message about protecting privacy in this bill. I thought the language 
was excellent, and it added to that purpose. It really does prevent any 
information in the bill from being misused by a company for anything 
other than the bill's strictly defined cybersecurity purpose. But his 
amendment adds an important clarification to make Congress' intent 
absolutely clear, to try again to reassure the American public that 
this is about protecting privacy and civil liberties while protecting 
the country.
  I want to thank Mr. Barton for working with me and my ranking member 
on this important issue, and I urge my colleagues to strongly support 
this amendment.
  Mr. BARTON. In reclaiming my time, Mr. Chairman, before I yield back, 
I want to thank my staff member Emmanual Guillory. He has worked 
tirelessly on this issue and on this amendment. I also want to thank 
Congressman Ed Markey of Massachusetts and his staff for working with 
me and Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member Ruppersberger.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Barton).
  The amendment was agreed to.


              Amendment No. 12 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 12 
printed in House Report 113-41.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill, add the following new section:

     SEC. 4. SAVINGS CLAUSE WITH REGARD TO CYBERSECURITY PROVIDER 
                   OBLIGATION TO REPORT CYBER THREAT INCIDENT 
                   INFORMATION TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT.

       Nothing in this Act or the amendments made by this Act 
     shall be construed to provide authority to a department or 
     agency of the Federal Government to require a cybersecurity 
     provider that has contracted with the Federal Government to 
     provide information services to provide information about 
     cybersecurity incidents that do not pose a threat to the 
     Federal Government's information.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 164, the gentlewoman 
from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Texas.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Let me thank the chairman and the ranking member for 
the work that they have done in getting us here today and in crafting 
the legislation, and I thank the Rules Committee for making what I 
think is a very important amendment in order. I thank this process for 
allowing clarifying amendments because we are here representing the 
American people.
  Mr. Chair, my amendment is straightforward. It improves the bill by 
indicating that:

       Nothing in this Act or the amendments made by this Act 
     shall be construed to provide authority to a department or 
     agency of the Federal Government to require a cybersecurity 
     provider that has contracted with the Federal Government to 
     provide information services to provide information about 
     cybersecurity incidents that do not pose a threat to the 
     Federal Government.

  We want to be concerned about that.
  It makes it clear that the only instance in which a cloud service 
provider can share information about a cyber incident with a government 
agency is when the objective of an attempted intrusion of the service 
provider's network was to gain unauthorized access to the government's 
information.
  I am pleased to state that this commonsense amendment is supported by 
a number of groups, including Constitutional Alliance, The Constitution 
Project, Liberty Coalition, and the ACLU.
  In other words, if a cyber incident does not threaten the 
government's information, then the incident is none of the government's 
need to intrude, and this is especially true when disclosure to the 
government would compromise an individual's privacy and proprietary 
information of businesses.
  Mr. Chairman, today, something commonly called the ``cloud'' plays an 
unseen but critical part in the lives of millions of Americans and 
thousands of businesses. Persons and businesses that use iPhones, 
Gmail, Yahoo!, and MSN email services are connected to the cloud. This, 
of course, does not in any way hinder our homeland security or national 
security. Cloud services include popular online services like Facebook 
and YouTube. The cloud is saving consumers and businesses from the loss 
of valuable data through storage services, and when you speak to our 
industries, they are protected.
  This is the cloud--all private sector. They are not intruded upon, 
but add the government--if the government comes in and decides just 
without any clarification that we'll give your information to others 
without it being necessary, without it being government information, 
without it being related to government operations, my amendment 
protects you in the private sector from that kind of intrusion.
  So I believe that this amendment will protect commerce. These are 
well-known names. This is who this amendment will protect--all of those 
who are generating commerce in the midst of cloud computing.
  Mr. Chairman, cloud computing is such an important innovation that it 
is changing how people, businesses, and government agencies manage 
information. The Jackson Lee amendment recognizes the importance of 
cloud computing to our economy, and it is consistent with the 
objectives of the bill while ensuring that the privacy and civil 
liberties rights of citizens are protected.
  Again, they are doing business with each other. Once we put in the 
government, the question has to be whether or not the government 
transmits information that is not necessary. My amendment protects 
consumers and businesses that are in the midst of providing and helping 
in their lives to make sure that users have their privacy. The cloud 
allows users seamless access to information from any location in the 
United States where the Internet is accessible and available. My 
amendment protects them and is ready to help clarify this bill, and I 
ask my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I yield to the ranking member of the committee, the 
distinguished gentleman from Maryland.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. I just want to thank the gentlelady from Texas for 
her hard work on this bill, and I support this amendment.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, while I do not oppose this 
amendment, I ask unanimous consent to control the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Yoder). Without objection, the gentleman is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. I want to thank the gentlelady for working 
with us. It is her concern and a genuine concern, and we've had 
discussions on this bill about the protection of privacy. It's an 
important element of the way we move forward to try to protect those 
companies that you talk about in the networks that protect the jobs of 
every American and the privacy of every American.
  Every piece of this bill is voluntary. No one is pressured or 
compelled to give anything to the government under this bill. In fact, 
the bill contains two important protections to drive this point home:
  First, the bill prohibits the government from requiring a private 
sector entity to share information with the government. It is 
completely, 100 percent voluntary;
  Second, the bill prohibits the government from conditioning the 
sharing of classified cyber threat intelligence with a private sector 
entity on the provision of cyber threat information back to the 
government in return. In other words, no quid pro quo, and this is a 
good protection that I know the gentlelady supports.
  I believe that these important provisions make it very clear that 
every molecule of this bill is 100 percent voluntary, and this 
amendment, I think, reaffirms the strong language that is in the bill 
in order to give that next level of confidence on all the privacy 
amendments we've adopted today and to make it very clear that it is 
paramount that we protect individuals' privacy in the conduct of 
sharing cyber threat information.
  I, therefore, support the amendment, and would urge the body to do 
the

[[Page H2136]]

same. Again, I thank the gentlelady for her work on this issue and for 
working with the committee to come to a better place.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Texas has 45 seconds 
remaining.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Again, I say that the cloud is saving consumers and 
businesses from the loss of valuable data. The Jackson Lee amendment 
adds to the firewall of protecting Americans' privacy and, in the flow 
and the discourse of business, of protecting the privacy of our 
businesses that do not have data that is necessary for the government's 
information. That should be said over and over again.
  I thank both the ranking member and the chairman for their kind 
remarks, and I ask my colleagues to support the Jackson Lee amendment 
that provides, again, the firewall of privacy.
  With that, Mr. Chairman, I ask support of my amendment, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  Mr. Chairman, I want to thank Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member 
Ruppersberger for the work in crafting this legislation and the Rules 
Committee for making my amendment in order.
  Mr. Chairman, my amendment is straightforward. It improves the bill 
by providing that:

       Nothing in this Act or the amendments made by this Act 
     shall be construed to provide authority to a department or 
     agency of the Federal Government to require a cybersecurity 
     provider that has contracted with the Federal Government to 
     provide information services to provide information about 
     cybersecurity incidents that do not pose a threat to the 
     Federal Government's information.

  Mr. Chairman, the Jackson Lee amendment makes clear that the only 
instance in which a cloud service provider can share information about 
a cyber incident with a government agency is when the objective of an 
attempted intrusion of the service provider's network was to gain 
unauthorized access to the government's information.
  Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to state that this commonsense amendment 
is supported by interested groups across the spectrum, from the ACLU on 
the left to the Constitutional Alliance on the right.
  In other words, if a cyber incident does not threaten the 
government's information, then the incident is none of the government's 
business.
  And this is especially true where disclosure to the government would 
compromise individuals' privacy and proprietary information of 
businesses.
  Mr. Chairman, today something commonly called ``the Cloud'' plays an 
unseen but critical part in the lives of millions of Americans and 
thousands of businesses. Persons and businesses who use iPhones or use 
Gmail, Yahoo and MSN e-mail services are connected to the Cloud.
  Cloud services include popular online services like Facebook, 
YouTube, ``LinkedIn'' (a professional networking service) and 
``Flickr'' (a place where millions of personal and family photos are 
stored).
  The Cloud is saving consumers and businesses from the loss of 
valuable data through storage services like the popular Apple iCloud. 
The Cloud protects digital information from loss should their computer 
or smart phone be damaged, lost or stolen. The Cloud also allows users 
seamless access to information from any location in the United States 
where internet access is available.
  Mr. Chairman, ``cloud computing'' is such an important innovation 
that it is changing how people, businesses, and government agencies 
manage information.
  The Jackson Lee amendment recognizes the importance of ``cloud 
computing'' to our economy and is consistent with the objectives of the 
bill while assuring that privacy and civil liberty rights of citizens 
are protected.
  This is an important amendment, and I urge my colleagues to support 
it.


             Organizations Endorsing Jackson Lee Amendment

       ACLU
       Constitutional Alliance
       Stop Real ID Coalition
       The Constitution Project
       The Liberty Coalition

                              {time}  1110

  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. McCaul

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider the amendment 
printed in section 3 of House Resolution 164 as modified by the order 
of the House of today.
  Mr. McCAUL. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       After section 1, insert the following new section (and 
     renumber subsequent sections accordingly):

     ``SEC. 2. FEDERAL GOVERNMENT COORDINATION WITH RESPECT TO 
                   CYBERSECURITY.

       ``(a) Coordinated Activities.--The Federal Government shall 
     conduct cybersecurity activities to provide shared 
     situational awareness that enables integrated operational 
     actions to protect, prevent, mitigate, respond to, and 
     recover from cyber incidents.
       ``(b) Coordinated Information Sharing.--
       ``(1) Designation of coordinating entity for cyber threat 
     information.--The President shall designate an entity within 
     the Department of Homeland Security as the civilian Federal 
     entity to receive cyber threat information that is shared by 
     a cybersecurity provider or self-protected entity in 
     accordance with section 1104(b) of the National Security Act 
     of 1947, as added by section 3(a) of this Act, except as 
     provided in paragraph (2) and subject to the procedures 
     established under paragraph (4).
       ``(2) Designation of a coordinating entity for 
     cybersecurity crimes.--The President shall designate an 
     entity within the Department of Justice as the civilian 
     Federal entity to receive cyber threat information related to 
     cybersecurity crimes that is shared by a cybersecurity 
     provider or self-protected entity in accordance with section 
     1104(b) of the National Security Act of 1947, as added by 
     section 3(a) of this Act, subject to the procedures under 
     paragraph (4).
       ``(3) Sharing by coordinating entities.--The entities 
     designated under paragraphs (1) and (2) shall share cyber 
     threat information shared with such entities in accordance 
     with section 1104(b) of the National Security Act of 1947, as 
     added by section 3(a) of this Act, consistent with the 
     procedures established under paragraphs (4) and (5).
       ``(4) Procedures.--Each department or agency of the Federal 
     Government receiving cyber threat information shared in 
     accordance with section 1104(b) of the National Security Act 
     of 1947, as added by section 3(a) of this Act, shall 
     establish procedures to--
       ``(A) ensure that cyber threat information shared with 
     departments or agencies of the Federal Government in 
     accordance with such section 1104(b) is also shared with 
     appropriate departments and agencies of the Federal 
     Government with a national security mission in real time;
       ``(B) ensure the distribution to other departments and 
     agencies of the Federal Government of cyber threat 
     information in real time; and
       ``(C) facilitate information sharing, interaction, and 
     collaboration among and between the Federal Government; 
     State, local, tribal, and territorial governments; and 
     cybersecurity providers and self-protected entities.
       ``(5) Privacy and civil liberties.--
       ``(A) Policies and procedures.--The Secretary of Homeland 
     Security, the Attorney General, the Director of National 
     Intelligence, and the Secretary of Defense shall jointly 
     establish and periodically review policies and procedures 
     governing the receipt, retention, use, and disclosure of 
     non-publicly available cyber threat information shared 
     with the Federal Government in accordance with section 
     1104(b) of the National Security Act of 1947, as added by 
     section 3(a) of this Act. Such policies and procedures 
     shall, consistent with the need to protect systems and 
     networks from cyber threats and mitigate cyber threats in 
     a timely manner--
       ``(i) minimize the impact on privacy and civil liberties;
       ``(ii) reasonably limit the receipt, retention, use, and 
     disclosure of cyber threat information associated with 
     specific persons that is not necessary to protect systems or 
     networks from cyber threats or mitigate cyber threats in a 
     timely manner;
       ``(iii) include requirements to safeguard non-publicly 
     available cyber threat information that may be used to 
     identify specific persons from unauthorized access or 
     acquisition;
       ``(iv) protect the confidentiality of cyber threat 
     information associated with specific persons to the greatest 
     extent practicable; and
       ``(v) not delay or impede the flow of cyber threat 
     information necessary to defend against or mitigate a cyber 
     threat.
       ``(B) Submission to congress.--The Secretary of Homeland 
     Security, the Attorney General, the Director of National 
     Intelligence, and the Secretary of Defense shall, consistent 
     with the need to protect sources and methods, jointly submit 
     to Congress the policies and procedures required under 
     subparagraph (A) and any updates to such policies and 
     procedures.
       ``(C) Implementation.--The head of each department or 
     agency of the Federal Government receiving cyber threat 
     information shared with the Federal Government under such 
     section 1104(b) shall--
       ``(i) implement the policies and procedures established 
     under subparagraph (A); and
       ``(ii) promptly notify the Secretary of Homeland Security, 
     the Attorney General, the Director of National Intelligence, 
     the Secretary of Defense, and the appropriate congressional 
     committees of any significant violations of such policies and 
     procedures.

[[Page H2137]]

       ``(D) Oversight.--The Secretary of Homeland Security, the 
     Attorney General, the Director of National Intelligence, and 
     the Secretary of Defense shall jointly establish a program to 
     monitor and oversee compliance with the policies and 
     procedures established under subparagraph (A).
       ``(6) Information sharing relationships.--Nothing in this 
     section shall be construed to--
       ``(A) alter existing agreements or prohibit new agreements 
     with respect to the sharing of cyber threat information 
     between the Department of Defense and an entity that is part 
     of the defense industrial base;
       ``(B) alter existing information-sharing relationships 
     between a cybersecurity provider, protected entity, or self-
     protected entity and the Federal Government;
       ``(C) prohibit the sharing of cyber threat information 
     directly with a department or agency of the Federal 
     Government for criminal investigative purposes related to 
     crimes described in section 1104(c)(1) of the National 
     Security Act of 1947, as added by section 3(a) of this 
     Act; or
       ``(D) alter existing agreements or prohibit new agreements 
     with respect to the sharing of cyber threat information 
     between the Department of Treasury and an entity that is part 
     of the financial services sector.
       ``(7) Technical assistance.--
       ``(A) Discussions and assistance.--Nothing in this section 
     shall be construed to prohibit any department or agency of 
     the Federal Government from engaging in formal or informal 
     technical discussion regarding cyber threat information with 
     a cybersecurity provider or self-protected entity or from 
     providing technical assistance to address vulnerabilities or 
     mitigate threats at the request of such a provider or such an 
     entity.
       ``(B) Coordination.--Any department or agency of the 
     Federal Government engaging in an activity referred to in 
     subparagraph (A) shall coordinate such activity with the 
     entity of the Department of Homeland Security designated 
     under paragraph (1) and share all significant information 
     resulting from such activity with such entity and all other 
     appropriate departments and agencies of the Federal 
     Government.
       ``(C) Sharing by designated entity.--Consistent with the 
     policies and procedures established under paragraph (5), the 
     entity of the Department of Homeland Security designated 
     under paragraph (1) shall share with all appropriate 
     departments and agencies of the Federal Government all 
     significant information resulting from--
       ``(i) formal or informal technical discussions between such 
     entity of the Department of Homeland Security and a 
     cybersecurity provider or self-protected entity about cyber 
     threat information; or
       ``(ii) any technical assistance such entity of the 
     Department of Homeland Security provides to such 
     cybersecurity provider or such self-protected entity to 
     address vulnerabilities or mitigate threats.
       ``(c) Reports on Information Sharing.--
       ``(1) Inspector general of the department of homeland 
     security report.--The Inspector General of the Department of 
     Homeland Security, in consultation with the Inspector General 
     of the Department of Justice, the Inspector General of the 
     Intelligence Community, the Inspector General of the 
     Department of Defense, and the Privacy and Civil Liberties 
     Oversight Board, shall annually submit to the appropriate 
     congressional committees a report containing a review of the 
     use of information shared with the Federal Government under 
     subsection (b) of section 1104 of the National Security Act 
     of 1947, as added by section 3(a) of this Act, including--
       ``(A) a review of the use by the Federal Government of such 
     information for a purpose other than a cybersecurity purpose;
       ``(B) a review of the type of information shared with the 
     Federal Government under such subsection;
       ``(C) a review of the actions taken by the Federal 
     Government based on such information;
       ``(D) appropriate metrics to determine the impact of the 
     sharing of such information with the Federal Government on 
     privacy and civil liberties, if any;
       ``(E) a list of the departments or agencies receiving such 
     information;
       ``(F) a review of the sharing of such information within 
     the Federal Government to identify inappropriate stovepiping 
     of shared information; and
       ``(G) any recommendations of the Inspector General of the 
     Department of Homeland Security for improvements or 
     modifications to the authorities under such section.
       ``(2) Privacy and civil liberties officers report.--The 
     Officer for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties of the 
     Department of Homeland Security, in consultation with the 
     Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, the Inspector 
     General of the Intelligence Community, and the senior privacy 
     and civil liberties officer of each department or agency of 
     the Federal Government that receives cyber threat information 
     shared with the Federal Government under such subsection (b), 
     shall annually and jointly submit to Congress a report 
     assessing the privacy and civil liberties impact of the 
     activities conducted by the Federal Government under such 
     section 1104. Such report shall include any recommendations 
     the Civil Liberties Protection Officer and Chief Privacy and 
     Civil Liberties Officer consider appropriate to minimize or 
     mitigate the privacy and civil liberties impact of the 
     sharing of cyber threat information under such section 1104.
       ``(3) Form.--Each report required under paragraph (1) or 
     (2) shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may include 
     a classified annex.
       ``(d) Definitions.--In this section:
       ``(1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
     `appropriate congressional committees' means--
       ``(A) the Committee on Homeland Security, the Committee on 
     the Judiciary, the Permanent Select Committee on 
     Intelligence, and the Committee on Armed Services of the 
     House of Representatives; and
       ``(B) the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
     Affairs, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Select Committee 
     on Intelligence, and the Committee on Armed Services of the 
     Senate.
       ``(2) Cyber threat information, cyber threat intelligence, 
     cybersecurity crimes, cybersecurity provider, cybersecurity 
     purpose, and self-protected entity.--The terms `cyber threat 
     information', `cyber threat intelligence', `cybersecurity 
     crimes', `cybersecurity provider', `cybersecurity purpose', 
     and `self-protected entity' have the meaning given those 
     terms in section 1104 of the National Security Act of 1947, 
     as added by section 3(a) of this Act.
       ``(3) Intelligence community.--The term intelligence 
     community' has the meaning given the term in section 3(4) of 
     the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 401a(4)).
       ``(4) Shared situational awareness.--The term `shared 
     situational awareness' means an environment where cyber 
     threat information is shared in real time between all 
     designated Federal cyber operations centers to provide 
     actionable information about all known cyber threats.''.
       Page 4, line 18, strike ``Federal Government'' and insert 
     ``entities of the Department of Homeland Security and the 
     Department of Justice designated under paragraphs (1) and (2) 
     of section 2(b) of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and 
     Protection Act''.
       Page 5, line 5, strike ``Federal Government'' and insert 
     ``entities of the Department of Homeland Security and the 
     Department of Justice designated under paragraphs (1) and (2) 
     of section 2(b) of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and 
     Protection Act''.
       Page 5, strike line 6 and all that follows through page 6, 
     line 7.
       Page 7, beginning on line 17, strike ``by the department or 
     agency of the Federal Government receiving such cyber threat 
     information''.
       Page 13, strike line 13 and all that follows through page 
     15, line 23.
       Page 17, strike line 15 and all that follows through page 
     19, line 19.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 164, the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. McCaul) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas.
  Mr. McCAUL. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume, 
and I want to first thank Mr. Rogers, Mr. Ruppersberger, Mr. Thompson, 
and all the staff for their real-time collaboration over the last 
several days, very late night hours, to get this amendment to 
perfection, and let me just say thanks again for that.
  Mr. Chairman, I strongly encourage support of this amendment. Cyber 
threats that the United States faces are real and immediate, and the 
key to addressing these cracks in our cyber defenses lies with bridging 
the gap between government and industry. My amendment helps do just 
that.
  This amendment would direct the Federal Government to conduct 
cybersecurity activities in a real-time, coordinated, and integrated 
way so that there is shared situational awareness across agencies to 
protect the Nation from cyber attack. This amendment would designate an 
entity within the Department of Homeland Security as the civilian 
Federal entity interface to receive cyber threat information from the 
private sector. This is an important improvement and provides an 
additional layer of review for information sharing procedures by a 
robust civilian privacy office in order to ensure Americans' civil 
liberties are protected.
  Additionally, another important improvement to the underlying bill by 
way of this amendment is designating an entity within the Department of 
Justice as the civilian Federal entity to receive cyber threat 
information from the private sector related to cyber crime.
  This bipartisan amendment improves the underlying bill and addresses 
concerns raised by privacy groups. These changes ensure that DHS and 
DOJ will serve as points of entry for those seeking to share cyber 
threat information with the Federal Government.
  With that, Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Mr. Chairman, while I am not opposed to 
the amendment, I ask unanimous consent to claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.

[[Page H2138]]

  There was no objection.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Mr. Chair, I rise in strong support of 
this amendment.
  Enhancing our security in cyberspace is of the highest importance, 
but it cannot be done at the expense of our privacy and civil 
liberties. The key to ensuring the necessary protections are in place 
is codifying in statute a strong civilian lead for information sharing 
with the private sector. Our amendment does just that.
  Yesterday, I reached an agreement with Chairman Rogers, Ranking 
Member Ruppersberger, and Chairman McCaul to offer this bipartisan 
amendment to strengthen the bill. The amendment establishes a center 
within the Department of Homeland Security as the Federal hub for cyber 
threat information shared under this bill, and the Department of 
Justice as the hub for all cyber crime information.
  With this amendment, citizens may take comfort knowing that their 
information will be more likely shared with the appropriate civilian 
agencies with the accompanying accountability and transparency; and 
businesses can be more sure that their dealings abroad will not be 
colored by the perception, fair or otherwise, that they are in cahoots 
with the National Security Agency.
  To be clear, this amendment does not fix all of the privacy or 
liability issues with the underlying bill, but it does establish the 
strong precedent of civilian control of cyber information sharing; and 
I hope we can fix the broader issues with the bill, should it pass, 
further down the line.
  This amendment is absolutely essential to the bill, and it sends the 
right message to the world about the way the United States will act in 
cyberspace.
  I reserve the balance of my time.

               Enhance the CIVILIAN Authorities in CISPA


               Enhance the CIVILIAN Authorities in CISPA

       Dear Colleague: Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member 
     Ruppersberger of the House Permanent Select Committee on 
     Intelligence, together with Chairman McCaul and Ranking 
     Member Thompson of the House Homeland Security Committee, 
     will offer an amendment that will designate a civilian lead 
     for the cyber security information sharing program under the 
     Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA).
       This amendment requires the President to designate a 
     civilian entity within the Department of Homeland Security 
     (DHS) to be the entry point to receive cyber threat 
     information and to designate an entity within the Department 
     of Justice (DOJ) as the civilian entity to receive cyber 
     threat information related to cybersecurity crimes. These 
     changes make clear that DHS and the DOJ will serve as points 
     of entry for those seeking to share cybersecurity threat 
     information with the federal government.
       The amendment also requires the Secretary of DHS, the 
     Attorney General, the Director of National Intelligence, and 
     the Secretary of Defense to establish procedures to eliminate 
     any personal information from cyber threat information shared 
     with the federal government. Cyber threat information shared 
     with the government from any source will be scrubbed of any 
     personally identifiable information and deleted--this is also 
     known as ``minimization.''
       Every agency receiving cyber threat information must notify 
     these four agencies, and Congress of significant violations 
     of the procedures required by the bill. These agencies must 
     also establish a program to oversee compliance with the 
     minimization procedures.
       We urge you to vote ``yes'' on this amendment.
           Sincerely,
     Michael T. McCaul,
       Chairman, Homeland Security Committee.
     Bennie Thompson,
       Ranking Member, Homeland Security Committee.
     Mike J. Rogers,
       Chairman, Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.
     Dutch Ruppersberger,
       Ranking Member, Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

  Mr. McCAUL. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
distinguished gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Rogers), the chairman of the 
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chair, I want to thank Mr. Thompson and 
Mr. McCaul for working so hard on this particular amendment to try and 
get it right. An agreement was agreed to and then undone, and then 
agreed to by some involvement who are filled with self-importance 
beyond this Chamber. We were able to work out those differences and get 
to a place where we all agreed.
  This is an important amendment. This is that civilian face that so 
many talked about for so long on this bill. And I want to thank both 
the chair and the ranking member of Homeland Security for working 
through all of the difficulties to get us to this place where we could 
present that civilian face and add yet one more reassurance about 
privacy, civilian liberty protection, and that this is not a 
surveillance bill.
  And I want to thank again Mr. Thompson for your graciousness, your 
patience for working with us, and Mr. McCaul for your leadership on 
this issue as well. I urge strong support for the McCaul-Thompson-
Ruppersberger-Rogers amendment.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Pelosi), the distinguished Democratic 
leader.
  Ms. PELOSI. Mr. Chairman, today the Internet and new technologies are 
shaping a world that we could scarcely have imagined even 10 years ago. 
It's giving Americans an easy way to build friendships, build business, 
and participate in democracy, all with the click of a button.
  But because so much of our daily lives are invested in cyberspace, it 
only takes one more click to put our personal identities, our economic 
stability, and our national security at risk. The threat of a cyber 
attack on our country is real, and our response must always balance our 
security with our liberties. That has always been the case in the 
history of America, the balance between liberty and security.
  There can be absolutely no doubt or delay in shoring up our Nation's 
cybersecurity. We must take clear, responsible, effective action to 
enhance the security of the American people.
  I want to commend Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member Ruppersberger, 
working together in a bipartisan way, for their leadership on this 
issue and their efforts to craft and try to improve this legislation. I 
want to thank Chairman McCaul and Ranking Member Thompson on the 
Homeland Security Committee for their energetic leadership on this 
subject as well. I thank both committees for recognizing the 
jurisdiction of the other committee.
  I had hoped that today we would be addressing some major concerns of 
Members of Congress and the White House by improving the legislation's 
protections of personal information. With all of the respect in the 
world for the work of our chairs and ranking members on this, and it 
has been considerable. You have standing on this issue that is 
recognized and respected. I am disappointed, however, that we did not 
address some of the concerns, as I mentioned, of the White House about 
personal information.
  Unfortunately, this bill offers no policies, did not allow any 
amendments--and I don't put that to you, no amendments--and no real 
solutions that adequately uphold an American's right to privacy.
  For one thing, in promoting the sharing of cyber threat information, 
the bill does not require the private sector to minimize irrelevant 
personally identifiable information from what it shares with the 
government, or other private matters. They can just ship the whole kit 
and caboodle. We are saying minimize what is relevant to our national 
security; the rest is none of the government's business.
  The bill continues to offer overly broad liability protections and 
immunities to the businesses that could violate our liberties rather 
than offering more targeted liabilities to ensure that the private 
sector only shares appropriate information.

                              {time}  1120

  We thought there might be a way to get this done by amendment--I'm 
sure that it would enjoy bipartisan support--but the Rules Committee 
did not allow that amendment to come forward.
  Most importantly, the bill fails to critically address the greatest 
weakness in our cybersecurity: our Nation's infrastructure. Too many of 
our country's systems, both physical and virtual, are still exposed to 
an increasing number of intrusions and attacks.

[[Page H2139]]

  Now, as a longtime former member of the Intelligence Committee, I 
know that infrastructure is not your jurisdiction, so in your original 
bill you couldn't go to that place. But now the Rules Committee could 
have allowed, with the cooperation of the Homeland Security Committee, 
us to go into infrastructure.
  If we're truly going to secure a reliable and resilient cyberspace 
that reflects our country's values, we must target our clearest 
vulnerabilities, while preserving a space that promotes the innovation, 
expression, and security of the American people.
  The world we live in and the threats our country faces can change 
with just one click. While we should never let Americans doubt our 
vigilance, our preparation, our effectiveness, we must never let us 
compromise their civil liberties.
  If we fail to meet the standard of security, we always do more harm 
than good.
  I, myself, am personally going to vote ``no'' on this legislation 
but, in doing so, salute the chairs and ranking members of the 
committees for taking us way down the road on this issue. It's just 
that crucial balance between security and liberty that I do not think 
has been struck in that bill. So, for my own part, it will not have my 
support.
  Mr. McCAUL. We have no more speakers. I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Mr. Chair, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Ruppersberger), the ranking member on the 
Committee on Intelligence.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. First thing, I want to thank the ranking member, 
Mr. Thompson, and I want to thank Mr. McCaul and Mr. Rogers for coming 
together. That's what we're elected to do, to come together in a 
bipartisan way and to deal with difficult issues. And they were 
difficult issues. But we're here today to all support this amendment.
  The White House and the privacy groups raised this as one of the main 
issues with the bill. These groups were concerned that there was an 
impression, wrongly, I believe, that the military would control the 
program. This was never the case, but we heard these concerns, and we 
are addressing them in this amendment.
  It means that companies sharing information about cyber threats will 
go to the Department of Homeland Security, a civilian agency. If the 
information is related to cybersecurity crime, the companies will go to 
the Department of Justice, another civilian agency.
  The amendment requires that the Department of Homeland Security share 
this information with other government agencies in real-time so they 
can use it to protect against future cyber threats and attacks.
  This amendment ensures we protect the security of our Nation, but 
also protect the privacy and liberties of our country and our citizens. 
I strongly support this amendment and urge other Members to do the 
same.
  I commend, again, Ranking Member Thompson, Chairman McCaul, Chairman 
Rogers for coming together at the last moment. I respectfully request a 
``yes'' vote on the amendment.
  You can't have security if you don't have privacy and liberty.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Mr. Chair, who has the right to close?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Mississippi has the right to 
close.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McCAUL. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Let me just say this: when it comes to this issue, particularly, 
which we know is one of the greatest threats that the United States 
faces right now, and that's the threat of cyber attacks, this is not a 
Republican-Democrat issue. It's really an American issue.
  And with all due respect, this does provide, I think, the balance 
between security and civil liberties; and it provides the civilian 
interface to the private sector to protect our critical infrastructures 
that are already under attack by countries like Iran, China, and 
Russia.
  So I think that, if anything, the recent events in Boston demonstrate 
that we have to come together as Republicans and Democrats to get this 
done in the name of national security. In the case in Boston, they were 
real bombs, explosive devices. In this case, they're digital bombs, and 
these digital bombs are on their way.
  That's why this legislation is so important. That's why it's so 
urgent that we pass this today. For if we don't, and those digital 
bombs land and attack the United States of America, and Congress fails 
to act, then Congress has that on its hands.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Mr. Chair, at this point, I'd like to 
say that I agree with Democratic Leader Ms. Pelosi's issue with respect 
to cyber, particularly critical infrastructure. And I look forward to 
working with Chairman McCaul on submitting legislation.
  With that, Mr. Chair, I encourage Members to support this bipartisan 
amendment that the chair of the Committee on Homeland Security and I 
drafted.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chair, I am in support of the amendment offered 
by Intelligence Committee Chairman Rogers, Congressman McCaul and 
Homeland Security Ranking Member Thompson to H.R. 624, the Cyber 
Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2013. This is very similar 
to the amendment I offered before the Rules Committee, but was not made 
in order. I am pleased that the focus of my amendment is addressed by 
this amendment that was made in order.
  This amendment just as I outlined in my amendment offered to the 
Rules Committee would establish a lead role for the Department of 
Homeland Security--a civilian agency in matters related to cyber 
security threats. DHS would be the agency to receive all cyber threat 
information. This amendment designates the Department of Justice (DOJ) 
as the civilian entity to receive cyber threat information related to 
cybersecurity crimes.
  These changes make clear that DHS and the DOJ will serve as points of 
entry for those seeking to share cybersecurity threat information with 
the federal government.
  The amendment also requires the Secretary of DHS, the Attorney 
General, the Director of National Intelligence, and the Secretary of 
Defense to establish procedures to eliminate any personal information 
from cyber threat information shared with the federal government. Cyber 
threat information shared with the government from any source will be 
scrubbed of any personally identifiable information and deleted--this 
is also known as ``minimization.''
  Every agency receiving cyber threat information must notify these 
four agencies, and Congress of significant violations of the procedures 
required by the bill. These agencies must also establish a program to 
oversee compliance with the minimization procedures.
  The importance of a civil agency in a central role regarding the 
establishment and functions of domestic cyber protection programs is 
critical to building in the transparency, accountability and oversight 
the American public expects. I am in strong support of this amendment 
and thank my colleagues for their efforts to address the concerns of 
many of our constituents as we work to assure the Internet is as safe 
as it can be and that we maintain the level of oversight that is 
needed.
  This is an important amendment, and I urge my colleagues to support 
it.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. McCaul).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. McCAUL. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas will 
be postponed.
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee do 
now rise.
  The motion was agreed to.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Denham) having assumed the chair, Mr. Yoder, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 624) to 
provide for the sharing of certain cyber threat intelligence and cyber 
threat information between the intelligence community and cybersecurity 
entities, and for other purposes, had come to no resolution thereon.

                          ____________________