Amendment Text: H.Amdt.403 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (07/24/2013)

This Amendment appears on page H5007 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H5002-H5031]
             DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2014

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Nugent). Pursuant to House Resolution 
312 and rule XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration 
of the bill, H.R. 2397.
  Will the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Hultgren) kindly take the 
chair.

                              {time}  1425


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 2397) making appropriations for the Department of 
Defense for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2014, and for other 
purposes, with Mr. Hultgren (Acting Chair) in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose on Tuesday, 
July 23, 2013, amendment No. 66 printed in House Report 113-170 offered 
by the gentlewoman from Hawaii (Ms. Hanabusa) had been disposed of.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on amendments printed in House Report 113-170 on which 
further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 48 by Mr. Jones of North Carolina.
  Amendment No. 51 by Mr. LaMalfa of California.
  Amendment No. 55 by Mr. Mulvaney of South Carolina.
  Amendment No. 60 by Mr. Stockman of Texas.
  Amendment No. 62 by Mrs. Walorski of Indiana.
  Amendment No. 65 by Ms. Bonamici of Oregon.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for each electronic vote 
in this series.


                 Amendment No. 48 Offered by Mr. Jones

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from North 
Carolina (Mr. Jones) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 177, 
noes 246, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 401]

                               AYES--177

     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bass
     Becerra
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Camp
     Capuano
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DesJarlais
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lucas
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Massie
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Nolan
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rangel
     Ribble
     Rohrabacher
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Thompson (CA)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Upton
     Walden
     Walz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--246

     Aderholt
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Beatty
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bucshon
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Clyburn
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     Delaney
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Guthrie
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Holding
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lowey
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pittenger
     Pompeo
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

[[Page H5003]]



                             NOT VOTING--10

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Grimm
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Pallone
     Rokita


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1429

  Mr. LaMALFA changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 51 Offered by Mr. LaMalfa

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. LaMalfa) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 235, 
noes 188, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 402]

                               AYES--235

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--188

     Amash
     Andrews
     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Grimm
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Pallone
     Rokita


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1433

  Ms. DUCKWORTH changed her vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 55 Offered by Mr. Mulvaney

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from South 
Carolina (Mr. Mulvaney) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 215, 
noes 206, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 403]

                               AYES--215

     Amash
     Andrews
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Collins (GA)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (SC)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Garrett
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Harris
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano

[[Page H5004]]


     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--206

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Gohmert
     Grimm
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Pallone
     Rokita
     Rush


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1438

  Messrs. GRAVES of Georgia and POSEY changed their vote from ``aye'' 
to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 60 Offered by Mr. Stockman

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Stockman) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 137, 
noes 286, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 404]

                               AYES--137

     Aderholt
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Capito
     Chabot
     Coffman
     Collins (NY)
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foster
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harris
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Labrador
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Luetkemeyer
     Maffei
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Mullin
     Neugebauer
     Palazzo
     Pearce
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reed
     Renacci
     Rice (SC)
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Wagner
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wolf
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--286

     Alexander
     Amash
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (AL)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gosar
     Granger
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pocan
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Ribble
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Roskam
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Grimm
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Pallone
     Rokita

[[Page H5005]]




                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1443

  Ms. LINDA T. SANCHEZ of California changed her vote from ``aye'' to 
``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 62 Offered by Mrs. Walorski

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Indiana 
(Mrs. Walorski) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 238, 
noes 185, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 405]

                               AYES--238

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Keating
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--185

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Grimm
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Pallone
     Rokita


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1447

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. TAKANO. Mr. Chair, on rollcall vote No. 405, I inadvertently 
voted ``aye.'' I intended to vote ``no.''
  (By unanimous consent, Mr. Dent was allowed to speak out of order.)


                   Washington Kastles Charity Classic

  Mr. DENT. Mr. Chairman, do you see this trophy before us? We've been 
on this House floor many times to celebrate baseball victories, 
football victories, or, I should say, baseball debacles in our case. 
But we celebrate a lot of things, also golf.
  I want to point out that we had a wonderful experience last week, 
Thursday night, with the Washington Kastles, who are seated up in the 
Members' gallery. We had a wonderful bipartisan game of tennis between, 
obviously, the Members, Republican and Democrat intermixed, as well as 
members of the media.
  I'm pleased to report to you that there were two teams, the Stars and 
the Stripes. My colleagues here, Mr. Watt, Ms. Edwards, and Shelley 
Moore Capito, were on the Stripes, and I'll introduce the Stars team in 
a moment. Mr. Bishop will do that. We had a wonderful game.
  We should also let you know, too, that members of the media played. I 
should let you know that part of Stripes' team included David Gregory 
of ``Meet the Press.'' He's a bigger problem on the tennis court than 
he is in an interview on ``Meet the Press.'' I also want you to know 
he's got a big serve. You've got to watch him. Our coach was Leander 
Paes, who's seated in the gallery, a professional. Our team also 
included former Senator John Breaux; Shelley Moore Capito, a Division I 
player from Duke. Did I say, ``Go Lehigh''? That's basketball. Sorry. 
There was also Peter Cook from Bloomberg; myself; Donna Edwards, who 
received the Good Sportsmanship Award; Mel Watt, who I must say was one 
of the most feisty players I've seen; Mark Ein, the owner of the 
Washington Kastles, who's also here; David Gregory; Jonathan Karl from 
ABC News; and Hans Nichols from Bloomberg--a very competitive 
individual, I might add. It was a great time had by all.
  I know it's never appropriate to gloat when you win, but we'll do it 
anyway since we're Members of Congress. Here's our trophy. Stripes beat 
the Stars.
  At this time, I yield to the gentleman from New York (Mr. Bishop).
  Mr. BISHOP of New York. Thank you very much. I appreciate my friend 
for yielding, although I must point out I don't remember Coach Doyle 
gloating like that when we won the baseball game.

[[Page H5006]]

  We had a great night, and I was pleased to play with my fellow 
Members: Jim Costa, Mike McIntyre, and Cheri Bustos. We had two members 
of the press from Fox News: Ed Henry and Bret Baier. We had two people 
from the White House: Gene Sperling and Alan Krueger. We had Ben Olsen 
from D.C. United. We had Ambassador Dino Djalal, and we were joined by 
three members of the Kastles: Murphy Jensen, Martina Hingis, and 
Anastasia Rodionova.
  Mr. DENT. Now I yield to the gentleman from California (Mr. Costa).
  Mr. COSTA. Thank you very much.
  I, too, want to thank my colleagues who participated with the Stars 
and Stripes. Fun was had by all. We raised a good amount of money for 
charity. I want to thank the Kastles for their wonderful hospitality. I 
got a tennis lesson from my partner, Martina Hingis.
  But I do have, from a reliable source, that the Stripes, our 
opposition, pulled in two ringers from the Main Street media with NBC's 
David Gregory and Bloomberg's Hans Nichols. These two failed to 
disclose their professional tennis status in an amateur charitable 
tournament. So much for press ethics under full disclosure.
  Mr. DENT. I now yield to the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. 
McIntyre).
  Mr. McINTYRE. Mr. Chairman, when you talk about helping with 
education, when you talk about helping food banks, and when you talk 
about helping our military families, it really was worth raising a 
racket about. That's what happened down at the Kastle stadium. We want 
to thank them for their hospitality.
  Tennis is a lifetime sport, but this offers a lifeline to those in 
need in our schools, those who are hungry, and also to our military 
families. We appreciate the great opportunity. It truly was a great 
time to have the ball in our court to do something in a positive way.
  Mr. DENT. Reclaiming my time, I just wanted to say, in conclusion, it 
was a wonderful cause. Many charities were supported.
  I should also let you know the Washington Kastles are playing tonight 
down at the waterfront. Get down there and watch them. It's not tennis 
anyone; it's tennis everyone. So get out there and do it.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. The Chair reminds Members that the rules do not 
allow references to occupants of the gallery.


                Amendment No. 65 Offered by Ms. Bonamici

  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, 2-minute voting will continue.
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Oregon 
(Ms. Bonamici) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 264, 
noes 154, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 406]

                               AYES--264

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Barr
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Cook
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Daines
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Al
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Hunter
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lynch
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Mullin
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tsongas
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--154

     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (AL)
     Buchanan
     Cantor
     Carson (IN)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Clay
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     DeSantis
     Doggett
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellmers
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gowdy
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Gutierrez
     Hanna
     Heck (NV)
     Holding
     Holt
     Honda
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Levin
     Long
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     Meehan
     Meng
     Miller (FL)
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Neugebauer
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Peters (MI)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Radel
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Roskam
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Sinema
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stockman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Turner
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Walberg
     Watt
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yoder

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Doyle
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     McCarthy (NY)
     Meeks
     Pallone
     Rokita
     Waxman


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1457

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.

                              {time}  1500


                 Amendment No. 67 Offered by Mr. Kilmer

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 67 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. KILMER. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:


[[Page H5007]]


       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. 10002.  None of the funds made available by this Act 
     may be used to issue to a civilian employee of the Department 
     of Defense a denial of a security clearance pursuant to 
     Department of Defense Directive 5220.6 that lists in the 
     notice of specific reasons of the clearance decision (as 
     defined in section 3.2 of such Directive) financial hardships 
     because of a ``furlough caused by sequestration''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from Washington (Mr. Kilmer) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. KILMER. Mr. Chairman, this amendment seeks to protect the 
continued employment of needed and trusted Department of Defense 
civilian employees. DOD civilian employees who are critical to our 
national security mission may be in danger of losing their security 
clearances and their jobs if financial hardships from being furloughed 
result in financial delinquencies.
  Right now, the DOD has issued vague guidance that they will take into 
account the impact that sequestration is having on servicemembers' 
financial situation.
  While I appreciate those efforts, I believe that Congress should 
strengthen our commitment to our servicemembers by ensuring no funds 
are used to deny the renewal of security clearances to workers who are 
only experiencing financial hardship as a result of sequestration.
  I believe this is a commonsense amendment, and it is my hope that it 
will receive strong support. I urge my colleagues to support this 
amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I understand the gentleman's 
intense interest in trying to protect these folks who would be affected 
by sequestration, but awarding or granting or giving a national 
security clearance is not a simple thing and it should not be taken 
lightly. If the Department of Defense or government agency decides that 
a person doesn't really qualify, they feel that they don't deserve a 
national security clearance, if the phrase ``furlough caused by 
sequestration'' is included in the denial, then the denial is null and 
void. You can't deny it if it is claimed that it's due to 
sequestration, and that's not fair. That's not fair to our national 
security. It's not fair, actually, to the Defense Department, and I 
just think this is not a good idea.
  But I know what the gentleman wants to accomplish and would like to 
work with him to figure out how to do this without denying the Defense 
Department the right to deny a security clearance to someone that they 
think is not a good risk for a security clearance.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. KILMER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Washington (Mr. Heck).
  Mr. HECK of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I want to thank Congressman 
Kilmer for offering this amendment today and, frankly, for his tireless 
advocacy on behalf of our men and women in our civil service who 
support our servicemembers and veterans every day. Without this 
amendment, hardworking men and women who live in the district I 
represent and who work at Joint Base Lewis-McChord risk losing their 
security clearance through furloughs that are no fault of their own, 
thus complicating their employment situation. We should not let that 
happen.
  The issue this amendment aims to resolve is yet another in a long 
series of issues that show why budgeting by sequestration is bad 
policy. I don't think anyone in this Chamber actually thinks civilian 
employees should lose their security clearance because they were 
furloughed, but the way sequestration was designed makes that a very 
real possibility.
  This is a good amendment to fix a bad policy. I strongly urge my 
colleagues to support it.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve.
  Mr. KILMER. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the remarks on the specific 
language of the amendment, and I do hope that we will continue to work 
through the conference process to address any concerns about the 
language because we can all agree that this is a serious issue. It is 
extremely important that the DOD continues to grant security clearances 
to employees who are charged with doing critical and sensitive work.
  There are many factors that DOD considers when determining if an 
individual can do these important jobs and to ensure that an employee 
is trustworthy. Sequestration-related furloughs and any financial 
hardships that come from sequestration are not an employee's fault. No 
civilian employee should be denied a security clearance because of 
Congress' inability to undo sequestration.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment and support DOD 
civilians and the work they do for our country.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, again I sympathize with what the 
gentleman is trying to do. It's just the problem in the denial, if they 
use the phrase ``furlough caused by sequestration,'' they can't deny 
that request for a security clearance, and there may be a lot of good 
reasons why that person should be denied.
  And so it's a question of do we protect the national security by 
giving the Defense Department the authority to deny regardless of what 
the furlough language is, or do we allow this amendment, which is 
probably poorly written; and we would like to work with the gentleman 
to write it in such a way that it doesn't cause us great distress. But 
I just don't want to see someone who should be denied a security 
clearance given one because of a technicality.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Kilmer).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. KILMER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 69 Offered by Mr. Nadler

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 69 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title) insert the 
     following:
       Sec. ___.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used for the continued detention of any individual who is 
     detained, as of the date of the enactment of this Act, by the 
     United States at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
     Cuba, and who has been approved for release or transfer to a 
     foreign country.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Nadler) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself 2 minutes.
  Mr. Chairman, this amendment prohibits funds from being used to 
detain cleared individuals held at Guantanamo. Of the 166 people 
currently being held there, 86 have been cleared for release; that is, 
they have not been charged with any offense. They have been found 
guilty of nothing, and they have been judged by our military to pose no 
threat to the United States if released. We should release them now. 
Holding these 86 people who have been cleared for release is against 
everything we claim to stand for.
  In response to this very situation, President Obama asked: Is this 
who we are?
  I hope today we will answer: No, we are better than that.
  I hope we support this amendment and move expeditiously to support 
the release of these detainees. It is truly astonishing that in 2013 
the United States continues to hold people indefinitely who have not 
been charged, let alone convicted of any crime, who admittedly do not 
pose any threat to the United States. They should be released.

[[Page H5008]]

  Guantanamo is an affront to America and to the founding principle of 
the United States that no person should be deprived of liberty without 
due process of law. Our continuing to hold prisoners indefinitely, 
without charge and without trial, is a rebuke to our professed support 
of liberty.
  If they've been judged not to pose a threat and we hold them anyway, 
what kind of message are we sending? By what claim of right do we hold 
people in jail who have been charged with nothing, whom we're not 
bringing to trial, and who we have decided pose no threat to us? What 
are we saying about the United States and our values? We must change 
course and we ought to support this amendment.
  Now, I know some will say these are dangerous terrorists. No, they're 
not. They're people who were captured in some way who have been judged 
by our military not to pose a threat to the United States, who have not 
been charged as terrorists, who have not been judged as terrorists. 
Some of them may be simply victims to the fact that we paid bounties to 
people in Afghanistan to turn in people who they said were terrorists. 
The Hatfields turned in the McCoys because--why not?--we were giving 
them a couple of thousand dollars.
  So anyone who has not been charged with a crime, who has not been 
convicted, and who we have already decided poses no threat ought to be 
released. And, therefore, this amendment says no funds may be used to 
continue their confinement. I urge its adoption.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I claim time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, the amendment would allow, and 
probably require, that a very large number of detainees from Guantanamo 
are sent back home to their home country or a country that they might 
have come to. They're detainees for a reason. They are detainees 
because they inflicted harm or danger or threats or death to our 
American interests, our American soldiers. They came from the 
battlefield.
  Now, we know that two of the former detainees who have been sent back 
to their country established a group that's run by those two former 
Gitmo detainees, and so I don't think it's a good idea. I think we 
should keep the detainees that are dangerous. Until such time as they 
meet the requirements of the law, they should stay at Guantanamo. They 
would have to ensure that the remaining Gitmo detainees, whom most 
judge as the most dangerous, will not be released or otherwise brought 
into the homeland where U.S. citizens could be threatened.
  Second, the present law ensures that, prior to releasing Guantanamo 
detainees to a foreign country, a careful and deliberate assessment 
must be made that the detainee is not likely to reengage in terrorist 
activities.
  What's wrong with that? There's nothing wrong with that, so why 
change it? Why turn these people loose to go back to the battlefield, 
which many of them that have been released have already done, causing 
additional harm to our troops. So I'm strongly opposed to this 
amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1515

  Mr. NADLER. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. 
Moran).
  Mr. MORAN. I thank the gentleman from our Judiciary Committee for 
yielding.
  And I want to say to my very good friend from Florida, the chair of 
the Defense Appropriations Committee, whom I greatly respect, I'm 
afraid there's a misunderstanding. This amendment is only about those 
detainees who have been cleared for release or transfer. This is not 
about the entire 166 people who are there.
  These are the people who, after a very careful review, have been 
cleared for release by the intelligence community and by the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff. So we're holding these people without cause. We're 
holding them because we've let our rhetoric get ahead of ourselves.
  The fact is that they would be released to their countries of origin. 
Their countries of origin are going to watch them. But these are people 
who we have found we have nothing to charge them with, and we have 
determined that they are not a threat to the United States or to anyone 
else. They shouldn't have been rounded up. They shouldn't have been 
detained. And they've been detained for 12 years.
  46 detainees are now having to be tube-fed. They're strapped down and 
a tube is forced down their nose and into their stomach. They're 
strapped down for 2 hours so the liquid gets digested.
  People that have been cleared for release, how can we justify doing 
this to them?
  And what's the end game of our current policy?
  Are we going to keep them until they die in prison? People who have 
been cleared for release and transfer, and we're just going to keep 
detaining them until they die?
  Because that's the only result of the current policy.
  Once they get cleaned, they should be released.
  Who are we, as a Nation to detain people indefinitely, without legal 
cause?
  It doesn't make sense. It's not American. It's a complete violation 
of our Constitution, of our most fundamental principle of equal justice 
under the law.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have left? How much time 
does the gentleman have left?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York has 1 minute remaining. 
The gentleman from Florida has 2\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. NADLER. I yield myself the balance of the time.
  Mr. Chairman, it would serve a purpose if people actually read the 
amendment. The amendment says none of the funds made available may be 
used to detain an individual who has been approved for release or 
transfer to a foreign country.
  We hear from the gentleman from Florida, these people are there for a 
reason. Yes, when we arrest somebody, a murder is committed, a rape is 
committed, we arrest somebody. But then, the grand jury says, no, we're 
not going to indict this person; there's not enough evidence.
  Do we hold them in jail indefinitely, forever, even though there's no 
charge, even though the District Attorney says we made a mistake; it's 
somebody else; they didn't do it? No.
  Because maybe they'll commit a crime? That's antithetical to every 
notion of what the United States is about. These are 86 people who are 
not charged as terrorists, who we have no evidence are terrorists, and 
who have been judged by the military and the Joint Chiefs of Staff and 
the intelligence community to pose no threat to us.
  By what claim of right do we hold them in jail? The United States, at 
this point, is no better than a kidnapper if it holds in jail people 
whom it charges with no crime and judges safe for release.
  Approve the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I don't think it can be said any 
stronger or needed to be said any more often. These detainees are bad, 
bad people. They hate America. They've sworn to kill Americans, and, in 
fact, they have done so on the battlefield, and that's why, when they 
were captured, they were sent to Guantanamo. That's where they should 
stay unless the current law is abided by, and that is, to ensure that 
the remaining Gitmo detainees who are most judged as the most dangerous 
will not be released or brought into the homeland where U.S. citizens 
could be threatened.
  Second, they ensure that prior to releasing Guantanamo detainees to a 
foreign country a careful and deliberate assessment must be made that 
the detainee is not likely to re-engage in terrorist activities and the 
foreign government can maintain control over the individual. What's 
wrong with that law?
  It protects Americans. It protects America, and it keeps the bad guys 
where they need to be kept. And in this particular case, it's at 
Guantanamo.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Nadler).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.

[[Page H5009]]

  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 70 Offered by Mr. Nadler

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 70 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title) insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to construct any new Department of Defense facility 
     at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, or to 
     expand any existing Department of Defense facility at such 
     Naval Station.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Nadler) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, this amendment would prohibit any funds in 
the bill from being used to construct or expand detention facilities at 
Guantanamo.
  The bill contains $249 million to convert temporary detention 
facilities into more permanent structures. But the administration wants 
to close Guantanamo and to release or transfer the detainees. So why 
waste $429 million to construct facilities that will not be used? 
Because many in Congress want to keep the detainees in Guantanamo 
forever.
  Now, we have, we know, 166 detainees in Guantanamo; 86 should be 
released immediately. The gentleman from Florida says that they're bad 
people; they are terrorists; they're there for a reason. No, they're 
not. They're there for different reasons. Some because they were handed 
over for bounties by rival militias or rival clans. Some because a 
mistake was made. Some because they're terrorists. But we make 
distinctions.
  The gentleman says we shouldn't release them until a careful 
assessment has been made. Well, a careful assessment has been made: 86 
of them, half of those in Guantanamo, have been cleared for release. 
That is to say, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the intelligence agencies 
have determined that these 86 people were not terrorists and were not 
likely to pose a threat to the United States if released. So they're 
guilty of nothing. They have been tried for nothing. We don't say that 
people are bad people, we ought to hold them in jail indefinitely 
without a trial normally, except here. So we ought to release the 86 
who have been cleared for release immediately, and the others we ought 
to try, put on trial.
  There's a separate dispute whether that should be an Article III 
court or a military tribunal. I prefer an Article III court, but either 
way, put them on trial in front of a court or in front of a military 
tribunal and let them be tried. Perhaps most of them will be guilty and 
put them in jail for long periods of time. Maybe some will be innocent. 
That's what the justice system is about.
  Are we really going to say that Guantanamo is separate? Anyone who is 
unlucky enough to be sent there because at one time we thought maybe 
they were dangerous should stay there indefinitely until they die 
without a trial?
  The assessment has been made for 86 of them. They have been judged 
not to be guilty, not to be a terrorist, and not to be a threat. That 
assessment has been made according to law, and these people ought to be 
released. The other 80 ought to be tried and, if convicted, ought to be 
put in prison in the United States. We have hundreds of terrorists in 
maximum security prisons in the United States. There's no reason a few 
more couldn't be put there, and we could save $249 million.
  Guantanamo was originally set up because it was thought by the Bush 
administration that if we held people in Guantanamo they could be tried 
or handled without having the constitutional rights of someone in the 
United States, but the Supreme Court said no. The people in Guantanamo 
have the same rights as if they were held in the United States. So it 
doesn't change what will happen to them, whether they're kept in prison 
in the United States or in Guantanamo.
  So let's release the 86 who ought to be released because they've been 
adjudged that they should be released by the Joint Chiefs and by the 
intelligence agencies. Let's try the others, and let's keep them in 
jail if they're adjudged guilty. Let's proceed with American justice 
notions and do ourselves proud, and let's stops wasting billions of 
dollars on Guantanamo.
  So this amendment says don't permanentize what should be and will be 
temporary, however temporary it is. Don't waste $249 million on making 
these facilities permanent.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, as I read the amendment, I'm 
assuming that the gentleman is trying to prevent any further 
construction or money of that type for the Guantanamo detainees. And I 
can understand that because we have just recently spent a lot of money 
building two brand new prisons, air-conditioned, comfortable, and we've 
already spent that money, so maybe we don't need to spend any money 
there.
  But what the amendment doesn't recognize is that since 1903, we have 
had a presence at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for our own military purposes. 
The 4th Fleet is headquartered there and has been there for many years. 
Allied shipping, allied Navy facilities, allied forces move through 
Guantanamo Bay on a fairly regular basis. I don't know that they have 
any specific requests right now for any kind of construction, but I 
don't think we want to deny it in the event that the Defense Department 
finds it important to do a construction project there.
  So, understand, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has been part of the United 
States military facility since 1903, and so I don't think this 
amendment is a good amendment because it would deny our troops, our 
forces not even involved with Guantanamo detainees the right for 
military construction, or the right for whatever needs to be spent.
  So, again, I just have to oppose this amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, how much time do we have left?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York has 1\1/4\ minute 
remaining. The gentleman from Florida has 2\3/4\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. NADLER. I yield 45 seconds to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. 
Moran).
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Chairman, we just approved $260 million in the defense 
authorization bill for Guantanamo. In addition, we approved another 
$186 billion to construct a new temporary facility, almost half a 
billion dollars, in addition to what we're now spending. We've spent 
this year alone $2,670,000 per Guantanamo detainee. Eighty-six of them 
have been cleared for release. We have no reason to keep them. And yet, 
we spend that much money on each of them.
  In U.S. prisons we spend $34,000 per year per maximum security 
prisoner. Imagine the discrepancy. We have now convicted 300 terrorists 
in U.S. prisons. They're being held at 98 Federal prisons for a 
fraction of the money. And we have no convictions at Guantanamo that 
haven't been overturned.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I think the gentleman just made 
my case. We don't really need a lot more money for construction for 
Guantanamo detainees. We've already spent a lot of money there.
  The point is, we don't want to deny the ability of the Defense 
Department to provide whatever is needed for our own military forces at 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, not part of the Guantanamo detainees.
  I think we've talked this one to death. We're repeating ourselves 
now. So, in the interest of time, I'm going to yield back the balance 
of my time.

                              {time}  1530

  Mr. NADLER. I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Chairman, the $249 million in the budget is for expansion and 
making permanent detention facilities. I have

[[Page H5010]]

no objection to construction of other military facilities at Guantanamo 
Bay. I don't know whether that makes sense or not. But the $249 million 
we're talking about here is for more detention facilities. That's a 
pure waste of money. And I'll be happy to clarify, if this amendment 
passes, that it should apply only to detention facilities.
  So if you're opposed to wasting $249 million more on detention 
facilities so we can spend hundreds of thousands of dollars a year per 
prisoner instead of $34,000 per year per prisoner in the United States, 
if you think that's a good idea to waste all this money, then vote 
against this amendment. I hope rational people who don't want to waste 
a quarter of a billion dollars for permanent detention facilities will 
vote for this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Nadler).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
will be postponed.


               Amendment No. 71 Offered by Mr. Pierluisi

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 71 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. PIERLUISI. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to implement, administer, or enforce--
       (1) the first sentence of section 204(c) of the Military 
     Construction Authorization Act, 1974 (Public Law 93-166; 87 
     Stat. 668);
       (2) the first sentence of section 9 of the quitclaim deed 
     of December 20, 1982 (transferring property on the Northwest 
     Peninsula of Culebra to the government of Puerto Rico), or, 
     with respect to such sentence, section 10 of the quitclaim 
     deed; or
       (3) with respect to a response action required under 
     section 2701(c)(1)(B) of title 10, United States Code, with 
     respect to property transferred by the quitclaim deed 
     described in paragraph (2)--
       (A) section 2(d)(15) of the enclosure 3 accompanying 
     Department of Defense Manual No. 4715.20, dated March 9, 2012 
     (relating to ``DERP Eligibility--Ineligible Activities''); or
       (B) section 8074 of this Act.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from Puerto Rico (Mr. Pierluisi) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Puerto Rico.
  Mr. PIERLUISI. Mr. Chairman, this budget-neutral amendment, which I 
offer with Mr. Young of Alaska, would enable DOD to remove unexploded 
ordnance from land in Culebra, Puerto Rico, which was used as a 
military training range for seven decades.
  In 1974, Congress enacted legislation directing the Navy to cease 
operations in Culebra. A provision stated that the present bombardment 
area shall not be utilized for any purpose that would require 
decontamination at the expense of the United States.
  In 1982, the Federal Government conveyed land in Culebra to the 
Government of Puerto Rico, including a 400-acre parcel within the 
former bombardment area. The deed provided that, in accordance with the 
1974 act, the Government of Puerto Rico would not hold the Federal 
Government liable for decontamination of the land.
  Four years later, in 1986, Congress enacted SARA, which amended the 
1980 CERCLA law. SARA states that DOD is responsible for cleaning up 
contamination it caused on current and former military sites and 
established the Defense Environmental Restoration Program for DOD to 
carry out these responsibilities. That program is funded by the bill 
under consideration today.
  SARA directed DOD to clean up former defense sites conveyed to third 
parties prior to 1986. These sites are eligible for Federal funding, 
even though there were no specific authorities enabling their cleanup 
at the time they were decommissioned and conveyed. Nevertheless, DOD 
contends that the 1974 law and the 1982 deed that tracks it prohibits 
the use of Federal funds to decontaminate the 400-acre parcel on 
Culebra, and these prohibitions were not superceded by SARA. As a 
result of this restrictive interpretation, Culebra is the only former 
defense site in the Nation that DOD contends it is barred by statute 
from decontaminating.
  This makes no sense. The 1974 act and the 1982 deed may have been 
consistent with Federal policy at that time since there was no legal 
framework in place that would have enabled the Federal Government to 
pay for the cleanup of the conveyed property. However, they're now 
squarely at odds with Federal policy that has been in place for more 
than 25 years under SARA. Accordingly, there's no principled basis to 
treat Culebra differently from thousands of other former defense sites 
conveyed out of Federal hands prior to 1986 which the Federal 
Government is obligated to decontaminate.
  The status quo poses a threat to human safety since this parcel 
contains beaches, walkways, and campgrounds visited by over 300,000 
people a year. A recent DOD report found that since 1995, there have 
been 70 incidents in which members of the public encountered unexploded 
munitions that could have caused great harm. In fact, in March of this 
year, a young girl visiting a Culebra beach suffered burns after she 
picked up an artillery shell containing white phosphorous. The FBI 
responded and found six other munitions which it detonated and removed. 
This potentially tragic incident underscores the need for congressional 
action.
  This amendment would ensure that the 1974 act ceases to function as 
an obstacle to implementation of current Federal policy, as reflected 
in CERCLA and SARA. The amendment simply ensures that Culebra will 
receive the same treatment as other former defense sites in the FUDS 
program. The citizens in Culebra sacrificed so our military could 
receive the training it needed. Congress, in turn, should take this 
small step to remove the barrier that is preventing DOD from addressing 
safety hazards that remain on the island.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Certainly I appreciate the gentleman's passion on 
this issue and agree that is an important issue that needs to be 
addressed. As he is aware, Mr. Chairman, the Department estimates it 
will take multiple years and a significant investment to properly 
address these contaminated sites in Puerto Rico.
  We look forward to working with the gentleman. We understand that he 
may be considering withdrawing his amendment so we can continue to work 
with him to address this problem, which significantly has impacted the 
Commonwealth.
  I will yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. PIERLUISI. I look forward to working with the majority.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I yield to the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. 
Visclosky).
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I appreciate my friend yielding to me.
  I simply want to rise in support of the gentleman's amendment. The 
agreement that was reached--and I think some people used the agreement 
as an excuse to do nothing--is 40 years old. It was entered into in 
1973. Well, they agreed to it. I graduated from law school in 1973. The 
world is a much different place today. People have changed. I certainly 
think our environmental consciousness has improved and our 
consciousness of our responsibility in this has improved. And I do 
think this is an opportunity to rectify that.
  I serve on the Energy and Water Subcommittee of this great committee. 
The chairman chairs that Energy and Water Subcommittee. Unfortunately, 
in the Formerly Used Defense Sites that were cited by the gentleman, we 
have over 10,000 properties, which is one of the problems I think the 
gentleman alludes to as far as the costs we have to deal with. All the 
more reason, I believe, that we ought to be very assiduous and active 
in beginning to address these sites.
  So I appreciate the gentleman raising it, and I certainly support his 
position.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Reclaiming my time, it was my understanding with

[[Page H5011]]

Mr. Young that the gentleman would consider withdrawing the amendment 
if we gave a commitment to continue to work with him on this very 
important issue, which he has dedicated so much time and effort to.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PIERLUISI. That's absolutely right. So I will withdraw my 
amendment. But let me just say that, again, this is one property. It's 
only one property out of thousands of properties facing these 
circumstances. So I hope we can work it out. It's not going to be 
costly. It makes sense to clean it up.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I yield back the balance of my time.


Moment of Silence in Memory of Officer Jacob J. Chestnut and Detective 
                             John M. Gibson

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the Chair's announcement of earlier 
today, the House will now observe a moment of silence in memory of 
Officer Jacob J. Chestnut and Detective John M. Gibson.
  Will all present please rise for a moment of silence.


           Amendment No. 72 Offered by Mr. Brooks of Alabama

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 72 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. BROOKS of Alabama. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. _.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used by the Department of Defense--
       (1) to implement or execute any agreement with the Russian 
     Federation pertaining to missile defense other than a treaty; 
     or
       (2) to provide the Government of the Russian Federation 
     with any information about the ballistic missile defense 
     systems of the United States that is classified or 
     unclassified by the Department or component thereof.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from Alabama (Mr. Brooks) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Alabama.
  Mr. BROOKS of Alabama. Mr. Chairman, my amendment prohibits funds to 
implement or execute any non-treaty executive agreement with Russia 
regarding missile defense or to provide Russia with information about 
America's ballistic missile defense systems, both classified and 
unclassified. The reason the amendment says classified and unclassified 
is to prohibit the administration from declassifying missile defense 
technology to skirt the law. A similar amendment was passed last year, 
with bipartisan support, and is included in the current continuing 
resolution that is funding our government during this fiscal year.
  Multiple news sources over the years have reported that the Obama 
administration may seek to share our missile defense secrets with the 
Russians. I am concerned these reports may be accurate. While the 
danger to national security is a serious concern, so is the loss of 
billions of dollars we have sunk into creating these exceptional 
technologies.
  The Congressional Research Service estimates the United States has 
spent approximately $153 billion on missile defense. Roughly 90 percent 
of that $153 billion, or $140 billion, has been spent on hit-to-kill 
technology.
  I ask the House to support this amendment to preserve America's lead 
in missile defense technologies, protect America's investment of 
billions of dollars, and ensure the viability of current and future 
missile defense technologies.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I rise to claim time in opposition to the gentleman's 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Indiana is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chairman, I had my breath taken away with the 
assertion that the President of the United States might give away the 
most intimate defense secrets of this country to Russia, and that we 
are debating an amendment to Defense appropriations, with all of the 
other problems we face and all the threats we face in this country, 
based on the assumption that the President of the United States might 
give away the most intimate defense secrets of this country to Russia.
  I would simply ask my colleagues to think about the underlying 
assumptions based in the gentleman's amendment and vote ``no,'' and I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BROOKS of Alabama. There have been numerous occasions in which 
the media has reported that the administration is considering, as a 
part of negotiations or other things, divulgence of our sensitive hit-
to-kill technology to the Russian federation.

                              {time}  1545

  I am thankful that my colleague across the aisle says that it takes 
away his breath, and I hope with that that he will support this 
amendment.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. BROOKS of Alabama. I yield to the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  We support your amendment. As you said, it is similar to what the 
bill carried last year and what was a provision in the armed services 
bill, so we are supportive of it. We're obviously mindful and 
respectful of the ranking member's position, but the majority of 
Congress felt the way you and I do and the committee did as well.
  Mr. BROOKS of Alabama. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chairman, the gentleman responds to my concern by 
suggesting that he has discovered the possibility that the President of 
the United States is going to give away the most intimate secrets this 
country holds to Russia through the media. I'm wondering--and I ask 
this question simply rhetorically, not necessarily of my colleague--I 
wonder if that was FOX News. I wonder if he saw that on the Colbert 
Report recently. I wonder if that was on the John Stewart program.
  I was watching CNN, and I didn't see any report of that yesterday; 
although, I saw that a baby was born in another country. Despite the 
world coming apart, that was the headline news. I didn't see MSNBC, and 
I don't know if that was it. Perhaps it was even on a BBC telecast. But 
I'm wondering what media outlets are providing this inside information 
as to the deliberations of the President of the United States to give 
away these cherished secrets.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BROOKS of Alabama. Mr. Chairman, I would submit that the 
appropriate way to gather the requested information is simply for the 
gentleman to Google what I have just stated.
  This issue arose in 2011 with numerous comments by the White House 
that were reported in numerous outlets. By way of background, my source 
is not FOX News in this particular instance, but all he has to do is 
Google it and he can find it.
  Also, there were numerous reports in 2012 where the President 
indicated--in what turned out to be an open mic--that once the 
elections were over with, he could more freely negotiate or give away 
information to the Russians. Those aren't the exact words used by the 
President. Unfortunately, I don't have perfect recall, but it was words 
to that effect.
  I would emphasize that this House has visited this issue previously. 
This has passed with bipartisan support. So I would urge this body to 
again, as a precautionary measure, adopt this amendment to prevent the 
sharing of our hit-to-kill technology with the Russian Federation to 
the extent that risk becomes a reality.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I reserve the balance of my time, and I understand I 
have the right to close.
  Mr. BROOKS of Alabama. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chairman, the gentleman indicated, in query to my 
rhetorical question, that all I have to do is Google and I will 
discover the information that will lead to our knowledge that the 
President of the United States is considering giving away this very 
sensitive information.
  It comes to mind, when the gentleman suggests I should Google it, how 
many different encounters I have had with members of the public who 
said, ``I saw it on the Internet; it must be true.'' For example, 
Members of Congress, after serving one term, receive a full salary 
pension for the rest

[[Page H5012]]

of their lives; and Members of Congress receive free health care for 
the rest of their lives; and Members of Congress, for the last 4 years 
in a row, have received significant pay increases because they Googled 
it on the Internet, and so they secured very specific, accurate 
information. Perhaps we should go to Facebook or LinkedIn or reddit, or 
maybe we should tweet each other.
  Again, in very serious concern, I would suggest my colleagues 
absolutely reject this amendment. I would ask for their vote against 
it, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Alabama (Mr. Brooks).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 73 Offered by Mr. Schiff

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 73 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. SCHIFF. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following:
       Sec. _.  None of the funds made available under this Act 
     may be obligated or expended pursuant to the Authorization 
     for Use of Military Force (Public Law 107-40; 50 U.S.C. 1541 
     note) after December 31, 2014.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Schiff) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. SCHIFF. Mr. Chairman, my amendment would prohibit funding the use 
of force pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force, or 
AUMF, effective on December 31, 2014, when the last American combat 
troops will rotate out of Afghanistan and the responsibility for 
security will have passed to the Afghan people after more than 13 years 
of war in that country.
  New Year's Day 2015 should not only bring about a new relationship 
between the United States and Afghanistan, it should also mark the end 
of a conflict that was begun in our skies on that September morning and 
which was formalized days later when the Congress passed the AUMF.
  That legislation provided the President with the authority to use 
``force against those nations, organizations, or persons he determines 
planned, authorized, committed, or aided the terrorist attacks that 
occurred on September 11, 2001, or harbored such organizations or 
persons, in order to prevent any future acts of international terrorism 
against the United States by such nations, organizations, or persons.''
  The 2001 AUMF was never intended to authorize a war without end, and 
it now poorly defines those who pose a threat to our country. That 
authority and the funding that goes along with it should expire 
concurrent with the end of our combat role in Afghanistan.
  In addition to this amendment, I have introduced bipartisan 
legislation, H.R. 2324, which sunsets the AUMF effective the same date, 
December 31, 2014, and calls on the administration to work with 
Congress together to determine what new authority, if any, is necessary 
to protect the country after that time.
  The Constitution vests the Congress with the power to declare war and 
the responsibility of appropriating funds to pay for it. It is our most 
awesome responsibility and central to our military efforts overseas. We 
owe it to the men and women we send into combat to properly define and 
authorize their mission, and my amendment will effectively give 
Congress the next 16 months to do so.
  In his recent speech at National Defense University, President Obama 
specifically called on Congress to work with him:

       I look forward to engaging Congress and the American people 
     in efforts to refine, and ultimately repeal, the AUMF's 
     mandate, and I will not sign any laws designed to expand this 
     mandate further. Our systematic effort to dismantle terrorist 
     organizations must continue, but this war, like all wars, 
     must end.

  This amendment is a prudent first step towards meeting the 
President's challenge, a call that we must embrace, not as Republicans 
or Democrats, but as Members of Congress sworn to defend the 
Constitution.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote and reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, in some ways I'm somewhat sympathetic 
to the hopes that underlie this amendment. I hope that terrorism has 
gone away by December 31, 2014. I hope that Zawahiri and the others 
responsible for 9/11 and those who authorized, committed, or aided the 
terrorist attack or harbored them are all brought to justice in the 
next 14 months. I hope that our country and other countries around the 
world no longer have to worry about terrorists hiding bombs inside 
their clothing or inside their bodies, trying to kill as many innocent 
people as possible. And I hope that military and civilians who serve 
our Nation all around the world, and others in the private sector, are 
no longer the target for suicide bombings and assassinations and the 
other sorts of things that we've seen since 9/11.
  But, Mr. Chairman, what if my hopes don't come to pass? What if the 
world has something else in store? What if terrorism still exists by 
December 31, 2014? Well, then it seems to me that this amendment 
doesn't make a lot of sense. Because this amendment says no matter 
what--not just in Afghanistan, but anywhere around the world--we're not 
going to fund anything through the Department of Defense pursuant to 
that AUMF.
  Now, I've got to say, I have been and continue to be for updating 
that AUMF to better reflect the way that al Qaeda has evolved over the 
last decade or so. Unfortunately, that has been resisted by the 
administration, as the gentleman just pointed out.
  Of course we all want this war against terrorists and other wars to 
end, but, unfortunately, the enemy gets a vote. So for us to 
unilaterally say, because of the calendar, we're done, and, oh, maybe 
we'll pass some new authority--but maybe not--in order to protect this 
country, I think, is dangerous. It's shortsighted. It is putting hopes 
above reality.

  So I hope my colleagues reject this. We can do better in fighting 
terrorists in a variety of ways. But to bury our head in the sand and 
say it's all going to be over on a certain date is not the way to 
protect this country, and I believe it forfeits our most essential 
responsibilities under the Constitution.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SCHIFF. I want to yield to my colleague from Indiana. Before I 
do, two quick points.
  No one is suggesting, of course, that terrorism is going to go away 
in 16 months or all of our problems will be over. But what we are 
saying with this amendment is that the authorization we passed that 
authorizes force against those who planned, authorized, and committed 
the 9/11 attacks shouldn't be used to go after groups like al Shabaab, 
which may not even have been in existence at the time of 9/11.
  This AUMF is now outdated; and unless we have a sunset date, we're 
going to continue to rely on an AUMF that no longer describes the 
nature of the conflict we're in.
  With that, I yield to the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Visclosky).
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I appreciate the gentleman yielding and rise in strong 
support of his amendment.
  The gentleman who is in opposition mentions that the administration 
mentions the United States Constitution. The fact is we have a 
constitutional responsibility. With the passage of more than a decade 
and a changing world--and I would agree with the gentleman, something 
else may be in store--we ought to revisit that issue. We ought to 
exercise our constitutional, congressional prerogative and have a full 
debate.
  Again, the gentleman is providing over 1\1/2\ years. In such a 
serious issue, I think even this Congress could come to grips with that 
type of fundamental issue and resolve the future.
  So I strongly support what the gentleman is doing and appreciate his 
amendment.
  Mr. SCHIFF. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I just point out to my colleagues, this

[[Page H5013]]

House has voted 2 years in a row to update the AUMF so it does better 
reflect the way that al Qaeda has changed. We have included the exact 
language used by the Obama administration and the Bush administration 
in court proceedings and just adopted that. The House has passed that. 
I don't remember how the particular gentleman voted on that, but the 
House has passed it. The Senate has not gone along. But there has been 
an effort to update the language to better reflect the way that the 
threat has changed, but that's a far different thing from saying, okay, 
we're just going to make this go away and hope that in the meantime we 
can do something better. I think that is terribly risky.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SCHIFF. I would only say to my colleague, through the Chair, that 
this institution has proved that unless we have a deadline, we simply 
refuse to act.
  What the President has said in terms of any new authorization for use 
of force--and it's something I agree wholeheartedly with the White 
House--is that he won't support a new authorization that is broader 
than the one that we seek to sunset. That, I think, is a problem with 
some of the drafts which the majority has proposed.
  We don't want an expanded war. We do want an authorization that 
reflects the precise nature of the threat, and that threat has changed 
since 9/11. It no longer comes as much from the core of al Qaeda, which 
has been decimated; rather, it comes now from a group of franchises, 
loosely affiliated organizations that sometimes, as a product of 
convenience, will associate with al Qaeda for financing or legitimacy. 
But it is now a far-flung terrorist challenge, and any authorization 
ought to reflect the changing nature of threat.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, may I inquire as to how much time I 
have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas has 1\1/4\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, the bottom line is you have to read the 
amendment and the words that are in it. The amendment says we can spend 
no money for any part of the Department of Defense pursuant to the AUMF 
after December 31, 2014.

                              {time}  1600

  Now, we can have a very interesting discussion about how the AUMF 
should be updated, about different authority that could take its place, 
but none of that is before us. What is before us is that it basically 
says, no funding shall be used. It essentially repeals the AUMF.
  Now, I realize the gentleman is trying to precipitate further debate, 
but the fact is terrorism is not going away. This prohibits any U.S. 
military action, not only in Afghanistan, but anywhere in the world 
that al Qaeda or its affiliates may have traveled. This stops all of 
that.
  My point is that there is too dangerous a risk in a world where there 
are too many people still trying to find new, innovative ways to attack 
us and kill as many Americans as possible. We can't take that risk.
  Therefore, I urge my colleagues to reject this amendment, and yield 
back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR (Ms. Ros-Lehtinen). The question is on the amendment 
offered by the gentleman from California (Mr. Schiff).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SCHIFF. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 74 Offered by Ms. Speier

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 74 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Ms. SPEIER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 9, line 6, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $65,000,000) (increased by $65,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Speier) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.
  Ms. SPEIER. Madam Chair, my amendment addresses a current issue that 
is undermining an already weakened system of justice in our military.
  Any JAG will tell you that it is impossible to effectively prosecute 
a case if the investigation was improperly handled. That is why the DOD 
Inspector General report released last week was so troubling.
  It uncovered that of the 501 investigations of sexual assault 
offenses they audited, all but 83 had some sort of deficiency. That 
means that less than 20 percent were completed without error. Fifty-six 
cases, 11 percent of the cases, had serious deficiencies. And 399 of 
these cases had interview and post-interview deficiencies. They also 
found weaknesses in collecting evidence, not developing leads, and 
photographing the scene. This in large part is a result of inadequate 
training in how to properly investigate these complex cases.
  A February IG report found that criminal investigators want and need 
more training on conducting sexual assault investigations. For example, 
criminal investigators for the Air Force told the IG they wanted more 
training on the psychology of interviewing victims and evidence 
collection. One investigator said he would be ``in trouble'' if he only 
relied on the training he received.
  That is why I'm offering this amendment that will provide an 
additional $10 million in funds to train investigators on how to 
properly investigate sexual assault-related offenses.
  My amendment realigns funds from the Operations and Maintenance 
Defense-wide account and shifts $5 million to Army Operations and 
Maintenance, $2.5 million to Air Force Operations and Maintenance, and 
$2.5 million to Navy Operations and Maintenance, which are accounts 
that pay for training investigators.
  Ensuring that assaults are investigated properly is the first step 
for holding perpetrators accountable.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Chairman, I claim the time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Chairman, this is an issue that we can't 
sweep under the rug any longer. We have got to face it square on. The 
gentlelady's amendment helps do that.
  The subcommittee when preparing this legislation was extremely 
concerned about the issue, and we have included considerable amounts of 
money to deal with sexual predators and sexual assaults in the 
military, especially demanding that the military do a better job at 
enforcing the rules, the laws, to protect the rights of those who are 
sexually abused.
  I thank the gentlelady for offering this amendment, and we do support 
the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. SPEIER. I thank the gentleman.
  Madam Chair, I've got goose bumps that I actually have an amendment 
that my colleagues on the other side support.
  I would like to yield as much time as he may consume to the gentleman 
from Indiana (Mr. Visclosky).
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I appreciate the gentlewoman for yielding and the 
chairman's support.
  Madam Chair, the amendment does seek to target an important part of 
the process when prosecuting a sexual assault--the investigation of the 
incident.
  As the Congresswoman pointed out, the Inspector General found this 
particular part of the process lacking in terms of interviewing 
victims, investigating crime scenes, and notifying the sexual assault 
response coordinator. The funding proposed would provide the means to 
include special training for tactics and techniques when investigating 
crimes of these natures. I would join the chairman of the committee in 
thanking her for raising the issue and strongly support it.
  I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.

[[Page H5014]]

  Ms. SPEIER. Madam Chair, let me just say in closing, we all now 
recognize 26,000 cases a year of sexual assault and rape. This is not 
sexual harassment, I might point out; this is unwanted sexual contact. 
Of those cases, only 3,000 are actually reported. The fear of 
reporting, the fear of reprisal is so great, that very few of them, 
less than 20 percent, actually report them.
  Then when you report these cases, to have them improperly or 
inadequately investigated, that then results in a handful of actual 
courts-martial, and then even smaller, some 250 convictions out of some 
3,000 that are reported suggests that we have a lot of work to do.
  I thank my colleagues for the support, and I yield back the balance 
of my time.
  Mr. KEATING. Madam Chair, I would like to thank my colleague, Ms. 
Speier for offering this amendment. Frequently, sexual-assault victims 
in the military are referred to Uniformed mental-health experts. From 
there, they are all too often subsequently diagnosed with ``personality 
disorders'' and separated from the military. While the military is 
making some positive steps to correct the improper processes 
surrounding sexual assault cases, it is impossible to know how many 
veterans of the military have disputed their personality disorder 
discharges and it is even more difficult to know how many victims of 
sexual assault did not come forward in fear of being labeled or 
scapegoated. Instead of sweeping these crimes under the rug, this 
amendment will review these cases and identify individuals that were 
improperly separated from the military subsequent to reporting a sexual 
assault and correct their record. I urge support for this important way 
forward in addressing sexual crimes.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Mr. Speier).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 75 Offered by Ms. Speier

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 75 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Ms. SPEIER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 8, line 2, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $5,000,000)''.
       Page 8, line 11, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $2,500,000)''.
       Page 8, line 24, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $2,500,000)''.
       Page 9, line 6, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $10,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Speier) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.
  Ms. SPEIER. Madam Chair, since I began working on this issue of 
military sexual assault 3 years ago, I've had the opportunity to speak 
to over 100 courageous survivors of rape.
  With each of their experiences, there is a unique nature to them. But 
many of these survivors that decided to report these crimes have had a 
very similar experience after they reported: they were retaliated 
against, ostracized, and involuntarily separated from the military on 
the grounds of a personality or adjustment disorder.
  Mental health diagnoses are grossly misused to administratively 
discharge or retaliate against survivors of sexual assault and other 
servicemembers. Since 2001, the military has discharged more than 
31,000 servicemembers on the grounds that they were subject to a 
personality disorder.
  A GAO investigation found that 22 to 60 percent of the time 
personality disorders were either not diagnosed by a trained 
psychiatrist or psychologist, or there was undue command influence.
  This pattern has become a potent lesson to servicemembers that are 
assaulted: report and get kicked out of the military with a personality 
disorder diagnosis. This designation amounts to a scarlet letter, 
pinned where their medals should be, and follows them for the rest of 
their lives. These servicemembers are re-victimized every time they 
apply for a job and submit their DD214s. It also makes it virtually 
impossible to retain a security clearance.
  My amendment aims to address this clear pattern of retaliation 
against victims who report a crime of rape or sexual assault. The 
amendment provides funds to correct their service record and provide 
them with the benefits they have earned. My amendment realigns $65 
million within the Operations and Maintenance Defense-wide account to 
dedicate these funds to identifying and correct the service record of 
servicemembers who were summarily discharged from the military 
following reports of a sexual assault. This amendment requires the 
Department of Defense to review all separations of individuals that 
made an unrestricted report of sexual assault and determine if they 
were discharged, and on what grounds--including personality and 
adjustment disorders. My amendment will also direct the Secretary of 
Defense to correct their records of service--to right this wrong--and 
provide them with any compensation and services they weren't able to 
receive as a consequence of this error.
  This is the very least we can do for these brave survivors. It is the 
first step in addressing the systemic re-victimization of courageous 
men and women who were brave enough to come forward.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Chairman, I claim the time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Again, Madam Chairman, this is a good 
amendment. Those who are subject to sexual assaults, sexual attacks, 
and who have been separated from the military on grounds of a disorder 
need to have their records corrected if information indicates that that 
should be done.
  Sexual assault victims have already suffered a great deal. They 
deserve to have their military records accurately reflect their 
military service. Those victims who were improperly discharged on the 
grounds of a personality disorder deserve to have those records 
corrected.
  We do support the amendment. This bill already provides substantial 
funding to provide these services.
  I notice a very distinguished gentleman rising who would like me to 
yield, and I yield to the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Visclosky).
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I appreciate the gentleman for yielding and would like 
to associate myself with his kind remarks, and appreciate the 
gentlewoman for offering the amendment and would like to indicate my 
support for the amendment as well.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Chairman, needless to say, we support 
this amendment. We have already robustly financed sexual assault 
programs. We fully fund the President's request for sexual assault 
prevention and response programs at the service level and at the 
Department of Defense Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program 
office.
  I would like to emphasize ``prevention.'' If we can prevent these 
sexual assaults, then the other problems go away. So it is important 
that we do pay attention to prevention.
  In addition, our bill provides $25 million to the Department and the 
services, including the Guard and Reserve, to implement a Sexual 
Assault Special Victims program, such as the Air Force Special Victims 
Counsel program, to provide all victims with specially trained legal 
assistance throughout the investigation and prosecution process--fair 
play. That's important.
  We also support a number of policy changes that were including the FY 
2014 National Defense Authorization Act. I think our bill goes a long 
way on this issue, and this amendment goes even further, so we 
enthusiastically support it.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1615

  Ms. SPEIER. I thank the chairman and the ranking member for their 
unanimous support of this effort and of this particular amendment.
  Madam Chair, let me just close by saying that the GAO says 20 to 60 
percent of these personality disorder designations are either done 
improperly or are done with undue influence. Certainly, those who have 
been victimized deserve to be able to have that designation erased from 
their DD-214 forms so that they are not in a position of having to then 
in the civilian world explain why they have this designation on their 
discharge papers.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

[[Page H5015]]

  Mr. KEATING. Madam Chair, I would like to thank my colleague, Ms. 
Speier for offering this amendment. While many protections for victims 
of sexual violence have recently been put in place across our Armed 
Forces, a review by the IG of military sexual assault cases revealed 
that over three-quarters (83%) of the 501 investigations conducted, 
were not properly investigated, and had significant deficiencies, such 
as a failure to collect key evidence; incomplete interviews; and only 
partial crime scene investigations. As a former District Attorney, I 
was stunned by these findings. I have worked to protect victims of 
abuse and violence throughout my career and know that such sloppy 
investigative work will only cause further injury to victims and their 
families. To add insult to injury, these victims are the very men and 
women who have devoted their lives to the lives of others. With this 
amendment, we will be returning the favor of their commitment to our 
country's security and ensure additional funding and training to close 
the harmful loops that exist in the military's investigative processes 
related to sexual assaults. This amendment is a vital step towards 
ensuring an environment where there is justice for all victims. I urge 
support of our amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Speier).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 84 
printed in House Report 113-170.


                 Amendment No. 97 Offered by Mr. Radel

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 97 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. RADEL. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following:
       Sec. _.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used with respect to Syria in contravention of the War 
     Powers Resolution (50 U.S.C. 1541 et seq.), including for the 
     introduction of United States forces into hostilities in 
     Syria, into situations in Syria where imminent involvement in 
     hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, or 
     into Syrian territory, airspace, or waters while equipped for 
     combat, in contravention of the Congressional consultation 
     and reporting requirements of sections 3 and 4 of that law 
     (50 U.S.C. 1542 and 1543).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from Florida (Mr. Radel) and a Member opposed each will control 10 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. RADEL. Madam Chair, this amendment should serve as a reminder to 
the President that he does not have the authority to unilaterally send 
our children to war. In fact, it was Senator Obama who in 2007 said:

       History has shown us time and again, however, that military 
     action is most successful when it is authorized and supported 
     by the legislative branch.

  Here we are, again, seeing that Senator Obama and President Obama are 
two very different people; and with the rhetoric heating up on Syria in 
particular and with word that we will now arm rebel factions, we must 
make a statement today. What we are saying is: Mr. President, if you 
want to go to war, you go through us.
  Don't get me wrong. My heart goes out to the innocent families who 
have been victimized and caught up in this fierce civil war in Syria, 
but that's exactly what it is--a civil war--and we cannot be the police 
of the world. If you thought that the situations in Iraq and 
Afghanistan were complicated, the situation in Syria has history going 
back 1,000 years with deep and profound complexities. We cannot just go 
into Syria and pick and choose who to arm. Too many times we have seen 
those we arm often turn their own weapons against us, weapons that we 
have provided. We do not have to use military force around the world to 
be a leader for democracy.
  This amendment is about Congress doing its job instead of following 
the President's cloudy, unclear foreign policy. This is about the House 
of the people making decisions for the people--for our young men and 
women in the military who are serving our country today.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Chair, I rise to claim the additional 10 minutes 
on the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Indiana is recognized for 10 
minutes.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I appreciate the gentleman for offering the amendment.
  Madam Chair, I would point out in my opening remarks that I think the 
fundamental responsibility of this body is to be engaged in these types 
of situations and to make determinations relative to our constitutional 
responsibility, particularly in dangerous situations when it involves 
military action. Syria, for example, is reported to have the fourth 
most sophisticated, integrated air defense of any nation on the planet 
Earth. Reports in the media indicate that Russia has kept these systems 
resupplied and up to date technologically.
  It is but one of many things that we have to consider as far as the 
safety and well-being of those who are in our military forces, as well 
as, ultimately, what our national interests are.
  At this point, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. RADEL. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Young).
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Chairman, first of all, I want to 
congratulate our colleague from Florida for having a very successful 
first few months in the Congress. He has done a really good job.
  I am happy to rise in support of this amendment. It is a responsible 
approach to a critical national security issue. We appreciate the 
gentleman working closely with the committee to address this issue in a 
responsible manner that protects our national interests.
  So I say, again, thank you for the initiative that you have offered 
here today.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Chair, I would make an additional observation on 
the gentleman's amendment.
  There are political and diplomatic issues of Russia's relationship 
with the Assad regime. Altering this relationship over the long run may 
become an objective of U.S. foreign policy. Maybe. Maybe not. However, 
entering into an armed conflict with this relationship in mind is a 
dangerous step, among many other dangerous steps, and it renews the 
prospect of a more openly hostile relationship with a country that 
otherwise had ended the Cold War. So it's certainly an additional 
reason as to my appreciation for the gentleman offering the amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. RADEL. I thank the gentleman.
  Madam Chair, I now yield 2 minutes to my neighbor up north, the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Rooney).
  Mr. ROONEY. I want to thank my friend from Florida (Mr. Radel) for 
bringing this amendment to the floor today.
  Madam Chair, I would have liked to have seen something that went 
specifically to not arming the so-called ``rebels'' in Syria, but I 
think it's important that we also address this issue of the President 
of the United States and what his obligations are to this Congress and 
to the American people under the War Powers Act.
  The Founding Fathers didn't want one person to be able to take us to 
these wars in foreign lands. They wanted there to be debate, 
deliberation, and for the President to have to come and make the 
argument to the American people through their representation as to why 
something is such an important part of our national interests that he 
would send our men and women into harm's way to potentially die for us 
in that land.
  In this case, we have Assad, who is a dangerous dictator in the 
Middle East. On the other hand, we have the rebels, who are infiltrated 
by al Qaeda and other bad actors--the same people we've been fighting, 
by the way, over the last 10 years.
  So whose side are we on--Sunni? Shia? It's a civil war in the Middle 
East. What is our national interest?
  Ladies and gentlemen, if you can't answer that question, if you're 
not absolutely sure--as the President needs to make us sure through the 
War Powers Act and through authorization, which this amendment 
requires--then you cannot support sending our men and women or getting 
involved in Syria or even sending weapons to the so-called ``rebels'' 
over there.
  Support the Radel amendment. Make the President make the case for 
Syria. Come to Congress, and let the people decide.

[[Page H5016]]

  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I yield such time as he may consume to my good friend 
from Vermont (Mr. Welch).
  Mr. WELCH. I thank the gentleman.
  I thank my colleague for this extremely important amendment.
  Madam Chair, we have a dire situation in Syria, and everyone's heart 
breaks for the suffering of the Syrian people. Over 100,000 people are 
getting slaughtered by the leader of their own government. It's 
absolutely unconscionable. So the questions for us are: What can we 
practically do? Whatever it is that we do do, does Congress have a say 
in the ``yes'' or ``no'' of military action?
  I thank the gentleman for this amendment because there are two 
questions here.
  One is as to the policy itself, the use of military force, arming the 
rebels. Is that a wise policy? Will it make things better or will it 
make things worse?
  The second question is: Whatever the policy is, is it the 
responsibility of those of us who have been elected to represent 
Americans as Members of Congress--and we all do--to be accountable in 
making that enormously important and consequential decision that has 
the potential to send our troops into combat?
  Let me talk briefly about the policy.
  The military situation there is chaotic. The rebels are united 
loosely in an effort to bring down Assad, but distinguishing between 
the ``good rebels'' and the ``bad rebels'' is impossible. In fact, we 
are reading reports right now of how rebels who are having disputes 
with fellow rebels are settling them by beheading them. That's 
literally what's happening. So the notion that we can have a 
micromanaged approach and pick the good guys and arm them and not have 
any reasonable and, actually, inevitable expectation that the arms will 
get into bad hands, I think, is naive.
  Also, General Dempsey, who is a hard-headed thinker about military 
matters, testified and laid out very clearly, if we just want to arm 
the rebels, that it's going to be like $500 million, or it could be 
into the billions. If we want to do standoff attacks, which supposedly 
will be surgical, that could be in the $1 billion-a-month range. If we 
want to actually have a no-fly zone, it will take hundreds of ships and 
aircraft in order to implement that--over $1 billion a month. That's a 
consequential decision that we can't stumble into.
  Then the second question, Madam Chair, is the congressional 
responsibility to act. One of the frustrations that, I think, Americans 
have with all of us is the sense that we are not accountable. Do you 
know what? If we allow an action to be taken that has the potential to 
send troops into combat and if we haven't actually stood up and voted 
``yes'' or ``no,'' then they are right. We have a job to do under the 
Constitution. This amendment is really saying to all of us here in 
Congress on both sides of the aisle that, if the moment comes when that 
decision is going to be made by the President, he has to return to us 
for approval, and we have to stand and make our decision.
  So with regard to that constitutional responsibility, what is more 
important?
  We all talk about how much we admire the troops for their willingness 
to sacrifice--and all of us do--but do you know what? All Americans 
admire the troops, but 435 Americans in this Chamber have the 
responsibility to make certain that, when we take advantage of the 
willingness of these young men and women to serve and to sacrifice, 
including to give up their lives, we are the ones who must make the 
decision about the policy. Our responsibility--all of ours--is to make 
certain that whatever policy it is we are asking them to pursue be 
worthy of their willingness to sacrifice. That has to be done at the 
beginning.
  Once our troops are in the field, yes, we have to support them. Then, 
once they're in the field, we find ourselves conflicted about having a 
discussion about how it is they got there. Do you know what? They got 
there because we sent them there. Sometimes we do it consciously. 
Sometimes we stumble into it. That's not right. There are 435 of us in 
this House who are united by a common responsibility to the soldiers 
and sailors who serve and to the citizens whom we represent.
  So I thank the gentleman as I see this as an opportunity for Members 
of this House on both sides of the aisle, who share a common admiration 
for the people who serve in the military and who share a common sense 
of duty to the people we represent, to be accountable for any policy 
that has the potential to send our soldiers into combat.
  Mr. RADEL. Madam Chair, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida has 6\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. RADEL. I would like to thank the gentleman from Vermont as well.
  Madam Chair, it is times like these as we debate this that we realize 
the heavy weight we carry on our shoulders. We are talking about 
people's lives as we approach this. Once again, this re-asserts the 
fact that this is the people's House and that we want to have a say in 
our foreign policy.
  At this point, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. 
Fortenberry).

                              {time}  1630

  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman from Florida for 
yielding and for this important amendment. Madam Chair, not only should 
there be no American troops sent to Syria, there should be no American 
weapons sent to Syria.
  Several weeks ago, a Catholic priest named Father Francois Murad was 
murdered in northern Syria. Who killed him? The very people that we're 
considering arming. What was he guilty of? Serving the poor. We have no 
business shipping weapons to those who would raid convents and kill 
innocent civilians.
  Madam Chair, there are now 100,000 people dead from this conflict. 
What began as a hopeful exercise of civic engagement by the Syrian 
people against the brutal Assad regime has now become a wanton 
slaughter. We don't know who is who among this Syrian rebel movement. 
No one there is safe, and no happy projections of democratic ideals 
will make this better. We do not have control over the Syrian battle 
space. Americans must not be complicit in this killing field.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Chair, from my perspective, I would also make it 
clear that what we're talking about at this point is the use of 
military force. There is no question that there is a significant and 
tragic humanitarian crisis taking place.
  It is estimated that about 6.8 million people are in need of various 
types of humanitarian assistance in Syria itself. There are about 4.25 
million people displaced within that country. We have 1.78 million 
Syrians displaced to neighboring countries. There were 486,972, as of 
the latest count, that are refugees in Jordan; 607,908 are refugees in 
Lebanon; 412,789 are refugees in Turkey; 161,014 are refugees in Iraq, 
and 92,367 in Egypt. It's one reason why today it's estimated that 
about $814 million of U.S. humanitarian aid has been expended for good 
purposes. That's certainly not what we're talking about here today, and 
I certainly would want to make our colleagues understand that as well.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. RADEL. Madam Chair, this is excellent bipartisan discussion; 
whereas, this country tends to be a little war weary these days, but we 
see where the United States can have a role, most especially when it 
comes to humanitarian aid, with our allies in the region and how 
exactly we can help.
  Once again, our colleagues on the other side of the aisle have 
highlighted just how deeply profound these complexities are in Syria. 
We're not only confused when it comes to who the rebels are--I don't 
even know if they're good or bad anymore. We simply don't know what 
rebel factions are playing a part in this. You've got Hezbollah, you've 
got al Qaeda, and then you have the state players in this; and we know 
that we have sensitive relationships with Russia, with China, who also 
potentially, at least diplomatically, are involved in this.
  Again, I just want to commend our colleagues here. This is excellent 
discussion.
  At this point, I yield such time as she may consume to the 
gentlewoman from Minnesota (Mrs. Bachmann).
  Mrs. BACHMANN. Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman for yielding.

[[Page H5017]]

  I feel very strongly about this issue, Madam Chair. I believe without 
a shadow of a doubt this is one of the most insane policies that 
borders on madness. For the United States to give funding, training, 
and arms most likely to al Qaeda in Syria doesn't make any sense.
  Can we realize what it is we're talking about right now? This is 
Islamic jihad, which has declared war on the United States and declared 
war on our ally Israel. And we're now in a position when we're 
authorizing arming, training, and funding for allies of al Qaeda, and 
al Qaeda themselves, in Syria? This is absolute madness.
  You see, Madam Chair, the decision to arm the Syrian rebels by the 
Obama administration just this week will likely have catastrophic 
consequences for our United States national security and the national 
security of our ally Israel. The Syrian rebels that the President wants 
to arm consist mostly of al Qaeda members that we've spent the last 
decade fighting a war against. Have we forgotten the thousands of 
Americans that were killed on September 11 in the horrific Twin Towers 
attack and here in this city at the Pentagon? We lost over 3,000 
Americans that day. Are we forgetting who we fought in Iraq and in 
Afghanistan? It's my opinion, Madam Chair, that this is insanity to aid 
those who've taken the lives of Americans with impunity and continue to 
do so.
  Just take note that the leader of al Qaeda is an individual named 
Zawahiri. Zawahiri called on Muslims from around the world to make 
their way to Syria and support the rebels and, in fact, become the 
rebels who are seeking to overthrow Assad.
  We don't have a great track record, Madam Chair, of putting arms into 
the hands of terrorists. Take a look at the Fast and Furious program in 
Mexico and the terrorists who received arms from the United States. 
Take a look at Benghazi and the tens of thousands of weapons, MANPADS, 
that went into the hands of al Qaeda after Benghazi. And now we're 
intentionally going to make a decision to send money, training, and 
arms to al Qaeda?

  How about a referendum with the American people? I think this would 
be more than a 90 percent issue. Don't do it. That's why we're standing 
here today. Don't do it.
  The top spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood is a man named 
Qaradawi. He has been outlawed from the United States because he's a 
terrorist. Also, he was outlawed from Egypt because he's a terrorist. 
He has called for jihad in Syria, and he has said:

       Every Muslim trained to fight and capable of doing that 
     must make himself available.

  So you have the head of al Qaeda and the head of the terrorist 
organization the Muslim Brotherhood both calling on Islamic jihadists 
to go to Syria to fight and be the rebels. And we're going to arm them, 
and we're going to train them, and we're going to provide materiel 
support to them? Not my vote.
  Madam Chair, former President Morsi, who was formerly the head of the 
Muslim Brotherhood, which was outlawed under Mubarak in Egypt, he 
supported the call from hardline Egyptian clerics who called for 
Egyptians to go fight jihad in Syria. So you see, there's a common 
thread here. All the wrong guys on the wrong team are all calling for 
jihadists to go to Syria and fight. It was reported that over 2,500 
Egyptians have already gone to Syria to fight jihad.
  Pakistan Taliban fighters have left Pakistan to join the fight in 
Syria, and they're working with al Qaeda-affiliated groups in Syria.
  On Monday, al Qaeda's Iraq-affiliated attack on the Abu Ghraib prison 
helped 500 inmates escape, most of whom were part of senior positions 
in al Qaeda. These prisoners included trained fighters and ideological 
extremists who are expected to travel to Syria to join the fight with 
the rebels.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I yield the gentlewoman as much time as she may 
consume.
  Mrs. BACHMANN. Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman on the other side 
of the aisle, my friend.
  These prisoners included trained fighters and ideological extremists 
who are expected to travel to Syria to join the fight with the rebels.
  The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the top military officer 
in the United States, Martin Dempsey, has warned us that intervening in 
Syria could assist Islamist extremists, helping them gain access to 
chemical weapons and biological weapons and further erode United States 
military readiness already suffering from sharp defense budget cuts. He 
has said that using force is ``no less than an act of war,'' and stated 
that some of the military options for Syria may not be feasible without 
compromising U.S. security elsewhere.
  He made reference to the chaos in Iraq after the fall of Saddam 
Hussein and Libya after Qadhafi. He warned of the unintended 
consequences if Assad fell without having a viable opposition. He said 
``we could inadvertently empower extremists or unleash the very 
chemical weapons we seek to control.''
  This is a hub for jihadist activity. The American taxpayer has no 
obligation. In fact, I say this body must protect the American taxpayer 
from being involved in arming al Qaeda in Syria. We must defeat this 
effort, and that's why I'm in support of this today.
  Again, we have the major general from the Israeli military 
intelligence, and he said that right before our eyes the center of 
global jihad is developing; let's not do it. I agree with him.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Radel).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 98 Offered by Mr. Massie

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 98 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. MASSIE. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following:
       Sec. _.  No funds made available by this Act may be used by 
     the Department of Defense to fund military operations in 
     Egypt, nor may funds made available by this Act be used by 
     the Department of Defense to fund individuals, groups, or 
     organizations engaged in paramilitary activity (as that term 
     is used in section 401 of title 10, United States Code) in 
     Egypt.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from Kentucky (Mr. Massie) and a Member opposed each will control 10 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Kentucky.
  Mr. MASSIE. Madam Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  There's been some misunderstanding about what my amendment does. I 
welcome the opportunity to clarify the intention of the amendment.
  I realize that Members of the House have different views about the 
current U.S. relationship with the Egyptian Government and the Egyptian 
military. This amendment is not designed to affect the current 
military-to-military relationship with Egypt. It is not intended to 
prevent U.S. participation in the Multinational Forward Observer 
mission in the Sinai, in other words, the peacekeeping mission. It is 
not intended to curtail the activities of the Office of Military 
Cooperation. It is not intended to prevent U.S. military exercises with 
the Egyptian military. And it is certainly not intended to prevent U.S. 
marines from providing security at our diplomatic facilities in Egypt.
  My amendment is quite simple. It's intended to prevent the U.S. 
military from engaging in offensive operations in Egypt and to prevent 
the Defense Department from providing assistance to Egyptian 
paramilitary or terrorist groups.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WOMACK. I claim time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arkansas is recognized for 10 
minutes.
  Mr. WOMACK. Madam Chair, I'm so pleased to hear my friend from 
Kentucky further discuss the true intent of what his amendment does; 
and respectfully, I recognize that, in order for the amendment to be 
made in order, it has to be written broadly. And because it was written 
broadly, there were concerns expressed by a number of people on both 
sides of the aisle about what an amendment written this way might do 
that would negatively affect a lot of

[[Page H5018]]

the things that we presently do and have been doing for a long time in 
Egypt.
  I can speak personally to it because it was right after 9/11, while 
commanding an infantry battalion in Arkansas with the Arkansas National 
Guard, that I was called to duty to lead a task force of infantry 
soldiers and other personnel of over 500 men and women to the Sinai in 
Egypt to become the U.S. battalion so that other forces of the 18th 
Airborne Corps could go prosecute missions elsewhere in support of the 
war on terror.
  The gunslingers of Arkansas distinguished themselves by going to the 
Sinai in Egypt on very short notice and executed that mission, the U.S. 
battalion in the South Sinai Peninsula that does the observe-and-report 
mission, consistent with all of the protocols that were established 
with the Treaty of Peace in 1979. In fact, our unit was there during 
the 20th anniversary of the MFO. Since that time, other State National 
Guard units have followed this mission and have been doing it 
consistently--Oregon, Oklahoma, and others--until, because of 
sequestration, the active component has accepted responsibility for 
that mission once again. So we've had a lot of our men and women across 
the country into the Sinai to do the mission of the MFO.
  On top of that, our country has had a number of exercises called 
Bright Star, which is, if not the largest, one of the largest military 
training exercises that takes place on a biennial basis.

                              {time}  1645

  Now it didn't happen in 2011 because of unrest in Egypt, but my 
understanding is that Bright Star is certainly going to occur again.
  So it is our hope, and as I said, I'm glad that my friend from 
Kentucky has further clarified the intent of his amendment, that it is 
not designed to affect the Multinational Forward Observer, nor is it 
designed to affect the training exercises that would happen with a 
Bright Star operation, nor does it affect what goes on with the Office 
of Military Cooperation or the Defense Attache program or, as he has 
indicated, our marine security to outposts in that region.
  So again, I am very, very pleased, and we can breathe a bit of a sigh 
of relief that there is no intent in here at all to abandon, Madam 
Chair, the Treaty of Peace that was famously signed in 1979, and 
everybody has the vivid reminder of that picture with Jimmy Carter in 
the middle and Anwar Sadat and Menachem Begin signing over that peace 
treaty.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. MASSIE. Madam Chair, I appreciate the words from my good 
colleague from Arkansas, and I certainly appreciate the service that 
he's provided to our country and the service that others have provided 
there in the mission of keeping the peace.
  If we count the two chairmen of the Supreme Council of the Armed 
Forces, Egypt has been led by five different men in the past 2\1/2\ 
years. So five of them in 2\1/2\ years, only one of them democratically 
elected. I would say this is not a stable environment, and so my 
constituents have concerns that we don't escalate military activity in 
the region.
  My good friend is correct about the intention of the amendment that I 
have offered. My amendment, again, is intended to prevent the U.S. 
military from engaging in offensive operations in Egypt and to prevent 
the Defense Department from providing assistance to the Egyptian 
paramilitary or terrorist groups. It's certainly not intended to 
prevent the peacekeeping missions or the current military missions 
there or, most of all, protecting our embassies. We want to make sure 
that we allow the service of our good marines over there in Egypt.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WOMACK. I yield as much time as she may consume to the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Granger), the distinguished chair of the 
Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, situations in Egypt have been problematic, 
and we're all dealing with that and trying to come to terms. But I want 
to remind Members that one reason we have a relationship with Egypt is 
the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty. We helped forge peace between Egypt and 
Israel, a peace that has held for over 30 years.
  Our military-to-military relationship has been a key component to 
keeping that peace. Since the signing of the treaty, the Egyptian 
military has been a reliable partner and ally. Throughout all the 
changes and turmoil, the Egyptian military has upheld our security 
arrangements, including the peace treaty. They've also maintained 
priority access for U.S. ships through the Suez Canal and allowed U.S. 
military planes to use their airspace. We cannot underestimate the 
importance of this.
  Furthermore, since July 3, the Egyptian military has successfully 
closed nearly 80 percent of the tunnels used to smuggle goods and arms 
into the Gaza Strip. This is an important part of our partnership and 
how we've worked together. The relationship between the United States 
and Egypt has never been more critical than it is now. This amendment 
could jeopardize our ability to help Egypt and Israel secure the Sinai 
if the intent were other than it has been explained just a few minutes 
ago. It could harm our efforts to secure the Libyan border with Egypt, 
which is used to smuggle weapons to be used against Israel.
  It's vital to the United States national security that we maintain 
our long-standing relationship with the Egyptian military. I'm not 
going to oppose this amendment as long as the intent is not to 
interfere with this 30-year partnership and relationship. U.S. and 
Israeli security are simply too important to put at risk.
  I appreciate the time and the effort.
  Mr. WOMACK. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Indiana (Mr. Visclosky), the ranking member.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I appreciate the gentleman yielding.
  Either to yourself or possibly for the author of the amendment, the 
question I have, because there has been a lot of talk, it is ``not the 
intent of the amendment'' to interfere with any intercooperation we 
have today with the Egyptians. It is not our intent not to be involved 
in the Sinai, but the amendment reads no funds, and then goes on to 
fund military operations in Egypt.
  If I am an adviser, if I am a member of the uniformed services, how 
is the intent met under the particular restrictions of the amendment? 
That would be my question.
  Mr. WOMACK. Reclaiming my time, I don't want to put words in the 
mouth of the author of the amendment, but I would yield to the 
gentleman from Kentucky to further clarify, as I understand it, his 
willingness to make sure that we make the appropriate adjustments to 
this amendment in a conference.
  I yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from Kentucky.
  Mr. MASSIE. I thank the gentleman from Arkansas.
  To allay your concerns and the concerns of the gentlelady who spoke, 
the intentions are the intentions that have been mentioned here, and 
the verbiage that was allowed in the amendment process was very 
difficult to convey the intention. It would be our intention to work 
through the process going forward in conference or otherwise to 
ameliorate the language and to ameliorate your concerns.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. If the gentleman will yield, as a Member of the House 
and the committee, I would want to participate in that to ensure we do 
not disrupt the very positive interchange that is taking place.
  Mr. WOMACK. Reclaiming my time, I thank the gentleman from Kentucky 
for his further clarification of the intent going forward beyond this.
  I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. 
Frelinghuysen).
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arkansas has 1 minute remaining.
  Mr. WOMACK. I yield 45 seconds to the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, it is in our interest that we have a 
strong, stable, moderate, and truly democratic Egypt. It's in the best 
interests of both our countries. We've had a 30-year relationship, and 
those interests would be damaged if we decide to in any way disengage 
from Egypt and its people in their quest for a true democracy or reduce 
current levels of support for the Egyptian military. This is a country 
of 80 million

[[Page H5019]]

people, a cornerstone of peace in the Middle East, despite its recent 
troubles, and we need to make sure that we keep the Egyptians close to 
us as a strong ally and work with their military operations.
  Mr. WOMACK. Madam Chair, let me just say in conclusion, I do 
appreciate my friend from Kentucky for further clarifying this intent 
of his amendment. It is something that I believe we can work with so 
long as we can make the proper adjustments once we get to conference.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Massie).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in House Report 113-170 on 
which further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 67 by Mr. Kilmer of Washington.
  Amendment No. 69 by Mr. Nadler of New York.
  Amendment No. 70 by Mr. Nadler of New York.
  Amendment No. 73 by Mr. Schiff of California.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.


                 Amendment No. 67 Offered by Mr. Kilmer

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington 
(Mr. Kilmer) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 277, 
noes 142, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 407]

                               AYES--277

     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Camp
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hurt
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lamborn
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Renacci
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuster
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--142

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Cantor
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Ellmers
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Paulsen
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reichert
     Ribble
     Roby
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Womack
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Barletta
     Bonner
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     Joyce
     McCarthy (NY)
     Olson
     Pallone
     Reed
     Rokita
     Vela

                              {time}  1722

  Messrs. PERRY and YOHO changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. ELLISON and STIVERS, Mrs. CAPITO, Mr. HUIZENGA of Michigan, 
Mrs. McMORRIS RODGERS, Messrs. UPTON, PEARCE, GRIFFIN of Arkansas, 
MESSER, LEWIS, THOMPSON of Mississippi, BROOKS of Alabama, GIBBS, DENT, 
GUTHRIE, BISHOP of Utah, and RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois changed their 
vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 69 Offered by Mr. Nadler

  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Terry). The unfinished business is the demand 
for a recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Nadler) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 176, 
noes 242, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 408]

                               AYES--176

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards

[[Page H5020]]


     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--242

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     Johnson (GA)
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     McCarthy (NY)
     Olson
     Pallone
     Rokita
     Speier
     Waters
     Wittman

                              {time}  1727

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Ms. MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM of New Mexico. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 
408, Nadler (NY) amendment No. 69, had I been present, I would have 
voted ``yes.''


                 Amendment No. 70 Offered by Mr. Nadler

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Nadler) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 187, 
noes 237, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 409]

                               AYES--187

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--237

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Delaney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens

[[Page H5021]]


     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Pallone
     Rokita

                              {time}  1732

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 73 Offered by Mr. Schiff

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Schiff) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 185, 
noes 236, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 410]

                               AYES--185

     Amash
     Bachmann
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Frankel (FL)
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--236

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bucshon
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Rodney
     Delaney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Meng
     Neal
     Pallone
     Rokita
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1737

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 99 Offered by Mr. Pompeo

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 99 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. POMPEO. Mr. Chairman, I rise as the designee of Mr. Nugent to 
offer the Nugent amendment.


                        Parliamentary Inquiries

  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, I have a point of parliamentary inquiry.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman may state his parliamentary inquiry.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, is it in order for a designee to offer an 
amendment on behalf of its sponsor on this bill?
  The Acting CHAIR. Would the gentleman please restate the 
parliamentary inquiry.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, is it in order for a designee to offer an 
amendment on behalf of its sponsor on this rule?
  The Acting CHAIR. Under the terms of House Report 113-170, the named 
sponsor of an amendment may name a designee.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, point of further parliamentary inquiry.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman may state his inquiry.
  Mr. POLIS. Does the gentleman from Kansas have a formal designation 
of the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Nugent)?
  The Acting CHAIR. The Chair has been made aware that the gentleman 
from Kansas is the designee of the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. POLIS. I thank the Chair.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following:
       Sec. __. None of funds made available by this Act may be 
     used by the National Security Agency to--
       (1) conduct an acquisition pursuant to section 702 of the 
     Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 for the purpose 
     of targeting a United States person; or
       (2) acquire, monitor, or store the contents (as such term 
     is defined in section 2510(8) of title 18, United States 
     Code) of any electronic communication of a United States

[[Page H5022]]

     person from a provider of electronic communication services 
     to the public pursuant to section 501 of the Foreign 
     Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from Kansas (Mr. Pompeo) and a Member opposed each will control 7\1/2\ 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Kansas.
  Mr. POMPEO. Mr. Chairman, the amendment I offer this evening 
clarifies and confirms the scope of two programs that Mr. Snowden 
illegally exposed while sitting in a hotel room in Communist China.
  First, the amendment clarifies that under section 702 no U.S. citizen 
or person in the U.S. can be targeted, period. I say again, no U.S. 
person under section 702 may be targeted in any way by the United 
States Government. While there are other specific authorities the U.S. 
person may be subject to an investigation, the U.S. Government may not 
do so under section 702. That's what this amendment intends to clarify.
  The second part of the amendment clarifies section 215, also known as 
section 501 of FISA. The amendment clarifies that no content of 
communications can be stored or collected by the National Security 
Agency--that's no emails, no video clips, no Skype. No record of the 
actual conversation or the contents thereof may be recorded or 
collected by the National Security Agency. I can't repeat that enough. 
That's the intent of this amendment.
  I want to make clear to everyone that, contrary to the suggestions of 
some, the NSA has not been acting outside of the scope of its 
authorities. The Meta-Data program is carefully designed with program 
layers of oversight by all three branchs of government. This is 
precisely the way our government ought to operate, with input from 
Article I and Article II and Article III of the United States 
Constitution.
  It is, of course, our duty to ensure that the NSA stays within these 
legal bounds here in Congress, and this amendment makes those 
boundaries perfectly clear for everyone to know and understand.
  And we shouldn't mislead the American people into thinking that the 
NSA has been acting illegally. There is perhaps no program in the 
United States Government that is as carefully monitored and overseen as 
the programs this amendment attempts to clarify.
  To the extent that some in this Chamber wish to review or provide 
more protections and controls for these programs, we should proceed 
through a carefully considered and debated legislative process so that 
the full implications for our security are clearly understood.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Indiana is recognized for 7\1/2\ 
minutes.

                              {time}  1745

  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chair, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Nadler).
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, this amendment has been described and 
offered as an alternative to the Amash-Conyers amendment that we will 
consider next. It is not.
  This amendment restates the existing ban on the intentional targeting 
of United States persons under section 702. It also places into law for 
the next fiscal year the Obama administration's current ban on 
collecting the contents of the communications of U.S. persons under 
section 215. I agree with these prohibitions. But they have nothing to 
do with the current misuse of section 215 to engage in the 
suspicionless, bulk collection of Americans' telephone records.
  The dragnet collection under section 215 telephone metadata program 
reveals call information--including all numbers dialed, all incoming 
phone numbers and call duration--but not the content of communications. 
Therefore, this amendment would have no impact whatsoever on this 
misuse of section 215. Metadata reveals highly personal and sensitive 
information, including, for example, when and how often one calls the 
doctor, a journalist, or the local Tea Party or ACLU affiliate. By 
tracing the pattern of calls, the government can paint a detailed 
picture of anyone's personal, professional, and political associations 
and activities.
  Congress never authorized this type of unchecked, sweeping 
surveillance of our citizens. It is this problem--the indiscriminate, 
bulk collection of metadata under section 215--that we need to fix 
right now.
  The Amash-Conyers amendment does so by restoring the required 
reasonable relationship between the collection of records and specific 
persons being investigated under section 215. The Amash-Conyers 
amendment ensures that this standard is not ignored by the 
administration or by the FISA Court, as is happening now.
  This amendment does not fix the problem with 215. The Amash-Conyers 
amendment does. However you vote on this amendment, and I intend to 
vote in favor of it, it is imperative that we also vote in favor of the 
Amash-Conyers amendment because this amendment, although doing no harm, 
does not solve the problems that Congress and Mr. Sensenbrenner and 
many others have articulated with respect to the misuse of section 215 
of the PATRIOT Act.
  Mr. POMPEO. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Thornberry).
  Mr. THORNBERRY. I thank the gentleman from Indiana for yielding, and 
I thank the gentleman from Kansas for offering this amendment, because 
it helps focus on what concerns most Americans and it clarifies what 
really is and is not happening.
  Mr. Chairman, sometimes it is a challenge for those of us on the 
Intelligence Committee to talk openly about this--even the safeguards--
in some of these programs. But this amendment helps make it clear and 
reassures Americans about some of the things they may have read or 
heard that is occurring with NSA. But at the same time, this amendment 
is not an overreaction that actually increases the danger that 
Americans face from terrorism around the world.
  This amendment says clearly that NSA cannot acquire information for 
the purpose of targeting Americans, and it says clearly that NSA may 
not acquire, monitor, or store the content of the communication of any 
Americans.
  I think the key point that Members need to know is there are multiple 
layers of safeguards to make sure that these programs operate exactly 
in the way that the FISA Court has laid them out to operate.
  The Intelligence Committees of both the House and Senate do a 
considerable amount of oversight, get regular reports. Even if somebody 
accidentally punches a ``2'' versus a ``3'' on their keyboard, we get a 
report about that. And it even goes so far as members of the 
Intelligence Committee can go sit next to the analysts and watch what 
they are doing.
  But it is not just the Intelligence Committees. The FISA Court has 
oversight of the same sorts of reports. They can change the guidelines 
that it operates under. But in addition to that, there are internal 
inspector general monitoring of these. So you get every branch of 
government involved in making sure that the safeguards are in place and 
those same safeguards will be in place to make sure that the provisions 
of the gentleman's amendment are followed as well.
  Some, however, Mr. Chairman, would do away with these programs. No 
amount of safeguards are good for them. But they never say what would 
replace them, they never say what would fill the gap in meeting our 
responsibilities to defend Americans. They would just have them go 
away, and I guess assume that somehow or other that Americans could be 
made safe.
  The truth is, we had been incredibly successful and somewhat lucky 
since 9/11 as far as preventing further terrorist attacks on our 
homeland. That is because of the work of the military, intelligence 
professionals, law enforcement and, as I say, a fair amount of luck.
  But these programs at NSA have made a crucial contribution to that 
success over the last decade. It seems to me it would be foolhardy to 
toss them away, as some would want to do.
  I think this amendment strikes the right approach. I also believe, 
Mr. Chairman, The Wall Street Journal makes a good point in today's 
editorial when it says:


[[Page H5023]]


       The last thing Congress should do is kill a program in a 
     rush to honor the reckless claims of Mr. Snowden and his 
     apologists.

  Mr. POMPEO. Mr. Chairman, I am happy to yield 3 minutes to the 
ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, the gentleman from 
Maryland (Mr. Ruppersberger).
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. Thank you, Mr. Pompeo.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the Pompeo amendment.
  This amendment strongly reaffirms that in America, privacy and 
security must coexist together. This amendment states in no uncertain 
terms that the government cannot use section 702 of the Foreign 
Intelligence Surveillance Act, FISA, to intentionally target an 
American for surveillance.
  This important amendment also reaffirms that phone conversations 
cannot be collected through section 215 of the PATRIOT Act. It makes 
the intentions of Congress very clear.
  I believe the Pompeo amendment makes a powerful statement that NSA 
cannot target Americans for the collection or listen to their phone 
calls. I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes.'' However, I do understand 
the concerns of the American people and of Congress when it comes to 
these programs.
  On the House Intelligence Committee, we are reviewing and evaluating 
potential ways to change the FISA Act that will provide the 
intelligence community with the tools it needs to keep our country safe 
while also protecting privacy and civil liberties. We are committed to 
having this important discussion. However, I do have concerns about the 
amendment we will debate next.
  The Amash amendment is an on/off switch for section 215 of the 
PATRIOT Act. It will have an immediate operational impact and our 
country will be more vulnerable to terrorist attacks. This authority 
has helped prevent terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. A planned attack on 
the New York City subway system was stopped because of section 215.

  But the Amash amendment passes this authority and it will end it. 
This amendment goes too far, too fast, on the wrong legislative 
vehicle. We need to debate the scope of this program, and we are, but 
this is an extreme knee-jerk reaction to the situation.
  This program has been authorized and reauthorized by Congress. It 
receives extensive oversight by the Intelligence Committee and is a 
vital tool for our intelligence community to protect our Nation. 
Remember, 9/11 happened in part because we failed to connect the dots. 
One of the critical tools we now have and use to connect those dots is 
section 215 of the PATRIOT Act. Remember, this is just phone records--
just phone numbers--no conversations.
  I respectfully urge a ``no'' vote on the Amash amendment and a 
``yes'' vote on the Pompeo amendment.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman 
from the State of California (Ms. Lofgren).
  Ms. LOFGREN. Thank you, Mr. Visclosky.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge a ``no'' vote on the amendment. Why? Because it 
restates current law, and current law has been interpreted by the 
administration in a way that is, frankly, contrary to the intent of the 
crafters of the PATRIOT Act.
  Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act says that you can obtain information 
that is relevant to a national security investigation.
  Now, what has happened since Congress enacted that provision? It is a 
low bar, but under the NSA's interpretation, it is no bar at all. 
Because, as has been widely reported, they are collecting the 
information about every phone call made by every American. Clearly, 
that is not relevant to a terrorist investigation.
  I think it is important to note that business records that are the 
subject of 215 include a lot of sensitive information. What are 
business records? phone records? Internet records? credit card records? 
medical records? Are these things that we would voluntarily give up to 
the government? No. They are incredibly sensitive, and that's why they 
are being sought.
  I do think it is important to note that the amendment that will 
follow after this one doesn't end the ability of the government to 
pursue terrorism. We are all for that. It merely requires that the 
government adhere to the law, which requires that there be relevance to 
a terrorist investigation.
  I certainly do not challenge the motivation of the gentleman who has 
offered this amendment, but I do think if you think that this provides 
a remedy, then you are wrong. This provides a fig leaf.
  We should vote against it, and I hope that we will move on to the 
Amash amendment and solve the problem today.
  Mr. POMPEO. Mr. Chairman, I am prepared to close. I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. POMPEO. Mr. Chairman, I would just like to correct a couple of 
things.
  This legislation is not a fig leaf. It is intended to clarify some 
things that have been said, some beliefs that people hold, about what 
section 215 authorizes and what section 702 authorizes.
  It is intended to make crystal clear to everyone here, as well as to 
the American public, the boundaries of these two important national 
security programs. These laws have been in place and interpreted by 
multiple administrations in the same way. There was no change in this 
law when this President came into office, and we should continue to 
support these programs regardless of who is the Commander in Chief for 
the United States.
  Mr. Chairman, I would ask my colleagues to support this amendment, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Kansas (Mr. Pompeo).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. POMPEO. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Kansas will 
be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 100 Offered by Mr. Amash

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 100 
printed in House Report 113-170.
  Mr. AMASH. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following new section:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to execute a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court 
     order pursuant to section 501 of the Foreign Intelligence 
     Surveillance Act of 1978 (50 U.S.C. 1861) that does not 
     include the following sentence: ``This Order limits the 
     collection of any tangible things (including telephone 
     numbers dialed, telephone numbers of incoming calls, and the 
     duration of calls) that may be authorized to be collected 
     pursuant to this Order to those tangible things that pertain 
     to a person who is the subject of an investigation described 
     in section 501 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act 
     of 1978 (50 U.S.C. 1861).''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 312, the gentleman 
from Michigan (Mr. Amash) and a Member opposed each will control 7\1/2\ 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Michigan.
  Mr. AMASH. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself 1 minute.
  We are here today for a very simple reason: to defend the Fourth 
Amendment, to defend the privacy of each and every American.
  As the Director of National Intelligence has made clear, the 
government collects the phone records without suspicion of every single 
American in the United States.
  My amendment makes a simple, but important change. It limits the 
government's collection of the records to those records that pertain to 
a person who is the subject of an investigation pursuant to section 
215.

                              {time}  1800

  Opponents of this amendment will use the same tactic that every 
government throughout history has used to justify its violation of 
rights--fear. They will tell you that the government must violate the 
rights of the American people to protect us against those who hate our 
freedoms. They will tell you there is no expectation of privacy in 
documents that are stored with a third party. Tell that to the American

[[Page H5024]]

people. Tell that to our constituents back home.
  We are here to answer one question for the people we represent: Do we 
oppose the suspicionless collection of every American's phone records?
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Chairman, I rise to claim the time in 
opposition to the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 7\1/2\ minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I am very happy to yield 3 minutes to the very 
distinguished chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Rogers).
  Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. I thank the gentleman.
  Mr. Chairman, I think the American people and, certainly, some well-
intentioned Members in this Chamber have legitimate concerns. They 
should be addressed. We should have time and education on what actually 
happens in the particular program of which we speak.
  I will pledge to each one of you today and give you my word that this 
fall, when we do the Intel authorization bill, that we will work to 
find additional privacy protections with this program which have no 
email, no phone calls, no names, and no addresses.
  Fourteen Federal judges have said, yes, this comports with the 
Constitution; 800 cases around the 1979 case have affirmed the 
underpinnings of the legality of this case--800. So 14 judges are 
wrong, and 800 different cases are wrong. The legislators on both 
Intelligence committees--Republicans and Democrats--are all wrong.
  Why is it that people of both parties came together and looked at 
this program at a time when our Nation was under siege by those 
individuals who wanted to bring violence to the shores of the United 
States?
  It is that those who know it best support the program because we 
spend as much time on this to get it right, to make sure the oversight 
is right. No other program has the legislative branch, the judicial 
branch, and the executive branch doing the oversight of a program like 
this. If we had this in the other agencies, we would not have problems.
  Think about who we are in this body. Have 12 years gone by and our 
memories faded so badly that we've forgotten what happened on September 
11?
  This bill turns off a very specific program. It doesn't stop so-
called ``spying'' and other things that this has been alleged to do. 
That's not what's happening. It's not a surveillance bill. It's not 
monitoring. It doesn't do any of those things.
  What happened after September 11 that we didn't know on September 
10--again, passing this amendment takes us back to September 10, and 
afterwards we said, wow, there is a seam, a gap--was somebody leading 
up to the September 11 attacks who was a terrorist overseas, called a 
``terrorist,'' living amongst us in the United States, and we missed it 
because we didn't have this capability.
  What if we'd have caught it?
  The good news is we don't have to what-if. It's not theoretical. 
Fifty-four times this and the other program stopped and thwarted 
terrorist attacks both here and in Europe--saving real lives. This 
isn't a game. This is real. It will have a real consequence. This is 
hard.
  Think about the people who came here before us in this great body--
Madison, Lincoln, Kennedy served here--and about the issues they dealt 
with and about the politics of ``big'' and of moving America forward 
while upholding the article I mandate to this House in that we must 
provide for the general defense of the United States. Think of those 
challenges. Think of those challenges that they met.
  Are we so small that we can only look at our Facebook ``likes'' today 
in this Chamber, or are we going to stand up and find out how many 
lives we can save?
  Let us get back to the big politics of protecting America and of 
moving America forward. Soundly reject this amendment. Let's do this 
right in the Intel authorization bill.
  Mr. AMASH. I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. 
Conyers).
  Mr. CONYERS. I thank the gentleman for yielding to me.
  Ladies and gentlemen of the House, this amendment will not stop the 
proper use of the PATRIOT Act or stop the FISA authorities from 
conducting terrorism and intelligence investigations. I'd never block 
that.
  All this amendment is intending to do is to curtail the ongoing 
dragnet collection and storage of the personal records of innocent 
Americans. It does not defund the NSA, and it will continue to allow 
them to conduct full-fledged surveillance as long as it relates to an 
actual investigation.
  Our joining together on this bipartisan amendment demonstrates our 
joint commitment to ensure that our fight against terrorism and 
espionage follows the rule of law and the clear intent of the statutes 
passed by this Congress. I urge my colleagues on both sides of the 
aisle to vote for this amendment.
  I rise in support of this amendment, which I am cosponsoring with my 
colleague from Michigan, Representative Justin Amash.
  This amendment will prevent mass collection of personal records, such 
as phone calling information, under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act. 
When Congress passed and later revised this provision, we did not 
intend for it to authorize the bulk, indiscriminate collection of 
personal information of individuals not under investigation.
  However, we have learned that this law has been misused to allow the 
collection of call detail information on every phone call made in the 
United States under a bizarre interpretation of the statute's 
authorization to collect ``relevant'' information. As my colleague and 
author of the statute, Representative Jim Sensenbrenner, has stated, 
``This expansive characterization of relevance makes a mockery of the 
legal standard.''
  This amendment will not stop the proper use of PATRIOT Act and FISA 
authorities to conduct terrorism and intelligence investigations. All 
this amendment is intended to do is curtail the ongoing dragnet 
collection and storage of the personal records of innocent Americans. 
It does not defund the NSA, and it would continue to allow them to 
conduct full fledged surveillance as long as it relates to an actual 
investigation.
  Our joining together on this bipartisan amendment demonstrates our 
joint commitment to ensuring that our fight against terrorism and 
espionage follows the rule of law and the clear intent of the statutes 
passed by Congress. I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to 
vote for this amendment to demonstrate our bipartisan commitment to 
protecting individual liberty.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I am very happy to yield 2\1/2\ minutes to the 
gentlelady from Minnesota (Mrs. Bachmann).
  Mrs. BACHMANN. I thank the gentleman from Florida.
  Madam Chair, this is a very important issue that we are taking up 
today because the number one duty of the Federal Government is the 
safety of the American people--of our constituents and of our own 
skins, the skins of each one of us in this Chamber today. As we know 
all too well, national security is a real and present danger, and it is 
something that we have to take quite seriously. We can't deal in false 
narratives.
  A false narrative has emerged that the Federal Government is taking 
in the content of Americans' phone calls. It's not true. It's not 
happening.
  A false narrative has emerged that the Federal Government is taking 
in the content of the American people's emails. It's not true. It's not 
happening.
  We need to deal in facts. The facts are real, and the facts are 
these:
  The only people who have benefited from the revelation of classified 
information by someone who worked for this government--who 
intentionally and without authorization declassified some of the most 
sensitive national security information that we have--are those who are 
engaged in Islamic jihad. They will have been benefited, and those whom 
we seek to protect will have not.
  Consider this:
  There is more information about each one of us contained in the phone 
book that sits at home on your kitchen counter than information that is 
in the National Security Database that we're talking about today. Your 
name, your address are in the phone book. Your name, your address are 
not in this National Security Database.
  No other nation in the world has the advantage that the United States 
of America has on national security--no

[[Page H5025]]

other nation--and we by this amendment today would agree to handcuff 
ourselves and our allies by restricting ourselves? Let it not be. Let 
us not deal in false narratives. Let us deal in facts that will keep 
the American people safe.
  When you look at an envelope, when a letter is put in the mail, is 
there a privacy right as to what has been written on that envelope? No, 
there isn't. There is a privacy right as to what is contained inside 
that envelope. That's a Fourth Amendment right.
  Is there a Fourth Amendment right to the record that you called 
someone on a certain day? No, there isn't--that's a record--but there 
is a Fourth Amendment right to what's in that phone call. Let's deal in 
reality, not in false narratives.
  Mr. AMASH. I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. 
Sensenbrenner).
  Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of the Amash 
amendment. I do so as the person who was the principal author of the 
PATRIOT Act in 2001, who got that law through quickly after 9/11 and 
who supported and managed its 2006 reauthorization.
  Let me make this perfectly clear that unlike what we have heard from 
speakers on the other side of this issue, this amendment does not stop 
the collection of data under section 215--the people who are subject to 
an investigation of an authorized terrorist plot. What it does do is to 
prevent the collection of data of people who are not subject to an 
investigation.
  Now, relevance is required in any type of a grand jury subpoena or in 
a criminal collection of data for a criminal trial. This goes far 
beyond what the NSA is doing. The time has come to stop it, and the way 
we stop it is to approve this amendment.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. AMASH. I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. 
Polis).
  Mr. POLIS. I thank the gentleman from Michigan for his leadership on 
this important issue.
  Madam Chair, reports of the NSA surveillance program have broad and 
far-reaching consequences.
  Many Americans feel that our fundamental liberties as a country and 
our constitutional rights are threatened. In addition, it has ruined 
and hurt our reputation abroad--threatening our trade relationships 
with allies, threatening American jobs as a result, and putting in 
danger our cooperative security relationships that we need to fight the 
war on terror.
  The responsible thing to do is to show some contrition. Let's pass 
this amendment. Let's make sure that we can have a practical approach 
that shows that protecting our liberties and securities are consistent 
and critical for the United States of America. I urge a ``yes'' vote.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. AMASH. I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from South Carolina 
(Mr. Mulvaney).
  Mr. MULVANEY. Madam Chair, here is the question:
  It's a question of balancing privacy versus security. It's a question 
beyond that. It's a question of who will do the balancing.
  Right now, the balancing is being done by people we do not know, by 
people we do not elect and, in large part right now, by somebody who 
has admitted lying to this body at a hearing. That's wrong.
  We should be doing the balancing. We were elected to do that. We need 
to pass this amendment so that we can do the balancing, not the folks 
who are not elected and whom we do not know.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. AMASH. May I inquire of the Chair how much time remains.
  The Acting CHAIR (Ms. Ros-Lehtinen). The gentleman from Michigan has 
3\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. AMASH. Madam Chair, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Lofgren).
  Ms. LOFGREN. I want to talk about the much ballyhooed oversight.
  Every year, there is a report to the Judiciary Committee, an annual 
report, on section 215. This year, the report was eight sentences--less 
than a full page. To think that the Congress has substantial oversight 
of this program is simply incorrect. I cannot match Mr. Sensenbrenner's 
brilliant remarks; but I do agree that when we wrote the PATRIOT Act 
relevance had a meaning.
  Madam Chair, I submit for the Record a letter to Mr. Sensenbrenner 
from the Department of Justice, which basically says, because 300 
inquiries were made, the records of every single American became 
relevant. That's a joke.
                                       U.S. Department of Justice,


                                Office of Legislative Affairs,

                                    Washington, DC, July 16, 2013.
     Hon. F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr.,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Sensenbrenner: This responds to your 
     letter to the Attorney General date June 6, 2013, regarding 
     the ``business records'' provision of the Foreign 
     Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), 50 U.S.C. Sec. 1861, 
     enacted as section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act.
       As you know, on June 5, 2013, the media reported the 
     unauthorized disclosure of a classified judicial order issued 
     under this provision that has been used to support a 
     sensitive intelligence collection program. Under this 
     program, which has been briefed to Congress and repeatedly 
     authorized by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court 
     (FISC), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) obtains 
     authorization to collect telephony metadata, including the 
     telephone numbers dialed and the date, time and duration of 
     calls, from certain telecommunications service providers. The 
     National Security Agency (NSA), in turn, archives and 
     analyzes this information under carefully controlled 
     circumstances and provides leads to the FBI or others in the 
     Intelligence Community for counterterrorism purposes. Aspects 
     of this program remain classified, and there are limits to 
     what can be said about it in an unclassified letter. 
     Department of Justice and Intelligence Community staff are 
     available to provide you a briefing on the program at your 
     request.
       In your letter, you asked whether this intelligence 
     collection program is consistent with the requirements of 
     section 215 and the limits of that authority. Under section 
     215, the Director of the FBI may apply to the FISC for an 
     order directing the production of any tangible things, 
     including business records, for investigations to protect 
     against international terrorism. To issue such an order, the 
     FISC must determine that (1) there are reasonable grounds to 
     believe that the things sought are relevant to an authorized 
     investigation, other than a threat assessment; (2) the 
     investigation is being conducted under guidelines approved by 
     the Attorney General under Executive Order 12333; and (3) if 
     a U.S. person is the subject of the investigation, the 
     investigation is not being conducted solely upon the basis of 
     First Amendment protected activities. In addition, the FISC 
     may only require the production of items that can be obtained 
     with a grand jury subpoena or any other court order directing 
     the production of records or tangible things. Finally, the 
     program must, of course, comport with the Constitution.
       The telephony metadata program satisfies each of these 
     requirements. The lawfulness of the telephony metadata 
     collection program has repeatedly been affirmed by the FISC. 
     In the years since its inception, multiple FISC judges have 
     granted 90-day extensions of the program after concluding 
     that it meets all applicable legal requirements.
       Of particular significance to your question is the 
     relevance to an authorized international terrorism 
     investigation of the telephony metadata collected through 
     this program. First, it is critical to understand the program 
     in the context of the restrictions imposed by the court. 
     Those restrictions strictly limit the extent to which the 
     data is reviewed by the government. In particular, the FISC 
     allows the data to be queried for intelligence purposes only 
     when there is reasonable suspicion, based on specific facts, 
     that a particular query term, such as a telephone number, is 
     associated with a specific foreign terrorist organization 
     that was previously identified to and approved by the court. 
     NSA has reported that in 2012, fewer than 300 unique 
     identifiers were used to query the data after meeting this 
     standard. This means that only a very small fraction of the 
     records is ever reviewed by any person, and only specially 
     cleared counterterrorism personnel specifically trained in 
     the court-approved procedures can access the records to 
     conduct queries. The information generated in response to 
     these limited queries is not only relevant to authorized 
     investigations of international terrorism, but may be 
     especially significant in helping the government identify and 
     disrupt terrorist plots.
       The large volume of telephony metadata is relevant to FBI 
     investigations into specific foreign terrorist organizations 
     because the intelligence tools that NSA uses to identify the 
     existence of potential terrorist communications within the 
     data require collecting and storing large volumes of the 
     metadata to enable later analysis. If not collected and held 
     by NSA, the metadata may not continue to be available for the 
     period that NSA has deemed necessary for national security 
     purposes because it need not be retained by 
     telecommunications service providers. Moreover, unless the 
     data is aggregated by NSA, it may not be possible to identify 
     telephony

[[Page H5026]]

     metadata records that cross different telecommunications 
     networks. The bulk collection of telephony metadata--i.e. the 
     collection of a large volume and high percentage of 
     information about unrelated communications--is therefore 
     necessary to identify the much smaller subset of terrorist-
     related telephony metadata records contained within the data. 
     It also allows NSA to make connections related to terrorist 
     activities over time and can assist counterterrorism 
     personnel to discover whether known or suspected terrorists 
     have been in contact with other persons who may be engaged in 
     terrorist activities, including persons and activities inside 
     the United States. Because the telephony metadata must be 
     available in bulk to allow NSA to identify the records of 
     terrorist communications, there are ``reasonable grounds to 
     believe'' that the data is relevant to an authorized 
     investigation to protect against international terrorism, as 
     section 215 requires, even though most of the records in the 
     dataset are not associated with terrorist activity.
       The program is consistent with the Constitution as well as 
     with the statute. As noted above, the only type of 
     information acquired under the program is telephony metadata, 
     not the content of any communications, not the identity, 
     address or financial information of any party to the 
     communication, and not geolocational information. Under 
     longstanding Supreme Court precedent, there is no reasonable 
     expectation of privacy with respect to this kind of 
     information that individuals have already provided to third-
     party businesses, and such information therefore is not 
     protected by the Fourth Amendment. See Smith v. Maryland, 442 
     U.S. 735, 739-42 (1979).
       Moreover, it is important to bear in mind that activities 
     carried out pursuant to FISA, including those conducted under 
     this program, are subject to stringent limitations and robust 
     oversight by all three branches of government. As noted 
     above, by order of the FISC, the Government is prohibited 
     from indiscriminately sifting through the telephony metadata 
     it acquires. Instead, all information that is acquired is 
     subject to strict, court-imposed restrictions on review and 
     handling that provide significant and reasonable safeguards 
     for U.S. persons. The basis for a query must be documented in 
     writing in advance and must be approved by one of a limited 
     number of highly trained analysts. The FISC reviews the 
     program approximately every 90 days.
       The Department of Justice conducts rigorous oversight to 
     ensure the telephony metadata is being handled in strict 
     compliance with the FISC's orders, and the Department of 
     Justice and The Office of the Director of National 
     Intelligence (ODNI) conduct thorough and regular reviews to 
     ensure the program is implemented in compliance with the law.
       The program is also subject to extensive congressional 
     oversight. The classified details of the program have been 
     briefed to the Judiciary and Intelligence Committees on many 
     occasions. In addition, in December 2009, the Department of 
     Justice worked with the Intelligence Community to provide a 
     classified briefing paper to the House and Senate 
     Intelligence Committees to be made available to all Members 
     of Congress regarding the telephony metadata collection 
     program. It is our understanding that both Intelligence 
     Committees made this document available to all Members prior 
     to the February 2010 reauthorization of section 215. That 
     briefing paper clearly explained that the government and the 
     FISC had interpreted Section 215 to authorize the collection 
     of telephony metadata in bulk. An updated version of the 
     briefing paper was provided to the Senate and House 
     Intelligence Committees again in February 2011 in connection 
     with the reauthorization that occurred later that year.
       Finally, we do not agree with the suggestion in your letter 
     that the Department's March 9, 2011 public testimony on 
     section 215 conveyed a misleading impression as to how this 
     authority is used. Quoting a portion of that testimony, your 
     letter states that it ``left the committee with the 
     impression that the Administration was using the business 
     records provision sparingly and for specific materials. The 
     recently released FISA order, however, could not have been 
     drafted more broadly,'' In fact, key language in the 
     testimony in question noted that orders issued pursuant to 
     section 215 ``have also been used to support important and 
     highly sensitive intelligence collection operations, on which 
     this committee and others have been separately briefed.'' We 
     hope that the explanation above regarding the use of this 
     authority to identify specific terrorism-related telephony 
     metadata records helps to clarify the point.
       The recent unauthorized disclosure of this and other 
     classified intelligence activities has caused serious harm to 
     our national security. Since the disclosure of the telephony 
     metadata collection program, the Department of Justice and 
     the Intelligence Community have worked to ensure that 
     Congress and the American people understand how the program 
     operates, its importance to our security, and the rigorous 
     oversight that is applied. As part of this effort, senior 
     officials from ODNI, NSA, DOJ and FI31 provided a classified 
     briefing for all House Members on June 11, 2013 and separate 
     classified briefings to the House Democratic Caucus and the 
     House Republican Conference on June 26, 2013.
       The Department of Justice is committed to ensuring that our 
     efforts to protect national security are conducted lawfully 
     and respect the privacy and civil liberties of all Americans. 
     We look forward to continuing to work with you and others in 
     the Congress to ensure that we meet this objective.
       We hope this information is helpful. Please do not hesitate 
     to contact this office if we may provide additional 
     assistance with this or any other matter.
           Sincerely,
                                                  Peter J. Kadzik,
                      Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General.

  Mr. AMASH. I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Barton).
  (Mr. BARTON asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. BARTON. I thank the gentleman.
  Madam Chair, this is not about how sincere the NSA people are in 
implementing this technique. It is not about how careful they are. It 
is whether they have the right to collect the data in the first place 
on every phone call on every American every day.
  The PATRIOT Act did not specifically authorize it. Section 215 talks 
about tangible things that are relevant to an authorized security 
investigation. In the NSA's interpretation of that, ``relevant'' is all 
data all the time. That is simply wrong. We should support the Amash 
amendment and vote for it.

                              {time}  1815

  Mr. AMASH. Madam Chair, I yield 15 seconds to the gentleman from 
South Carolina (Mr. Duncan).
  Mr. DUNCAN of South Carolina. Madam Chair, amendment IV:

       The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
     house, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and 
     seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, 
     but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, 
     and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the 
     persons or things to be seized.

  Those who choose to trade liberty for security will find they have 
neither.
  Mr. AMASH. Madam Chair, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Poe).
  Mr. POE of Texas. Warrants need to be particular and specific about 
the place to be searched and the items to be seized.
  No judge would ever sign a general search warrant like the British 
did, allowing the police to search every house on the block, much less 
seize everybody's phone records, but this is what has happened under 
section 215 under the government.
  The government has gone too far in the name of security and the 
Fourth Amendment has been bruised.
  Rein in government invasion. No more dragnet operations. Get a 
specific warrant based on probable cause, or stay out of our lives.
  And that's just the way it is.
  Mr. AMASH. I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Nadler).
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chairperson, this amendment stops the government 
from misusing section 215, to engage in the dragnet collection of all 
of our personal telephone records. Congress did not grant the executive 
the authority to collect everything it wants so long as it limits any 
subsequent search of that data.
  This amendment restores the requirement that records sought are 
relevant to an authorized foreign intelligence or terrorist 
investigation. It restores the minimal relevant standard required by 
Congress but ignored by successive administrations.
  No administration should be permitted to operate above or beyond the 
law as they have done in this respect. I therefore urge all of my 
colleagues to vote in favor of the Amash-Conyers amendment.
  Mr. AMASH. I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. 
Griffith).
  Mr. GRIFFITH of Virginia. General warrants, writs of assistance, 
that's what we're looking at, and the Founding Fathers found that to be 
anathema. What they're doing does violate the Fourth Amendment. We took 
an oath to uphold the Constitution, and we're supposed to rely on a 
secret agency that deals with a secret court that deals with a 
selective secrecy committee; and Members of Congress are limited to 
their access to the actions of that committee, but we're supposed to 
trust them.
  Folks, we've got a job to do. Vote ``yes.''

[[Page H5027]]

  Mr. AMASH. Madam Chair, may I inquire as to how much time remains?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Michigan has 45 seconds 
remaining, and the gentleman from Florida has 2 minutes remaining.
  Mr. AMASH. I yield 30 seconds to the gentlelady from Hawaii (Ms. 
Gabbard).
  Ms. GABBARD. Madam Chairwoman, countless men and women from my State 
of Hawaii and all across the country have worn the uniform and put 
their lives on the line to protect our freedoms and our liberties. I 
cannot in good conscience vote to take a single dollar from the pockets 
of hardworking taxpayers from across the country to pay for programs 
which infringe on the very liberties and freedoms our troops have 
fought and died for.
  Ben Franklin said:

       They who give up essential liberty to obtain a little 
     temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.

  Mr. AMASH. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  We're here to answer one question for the people we represent: Do we 
oppose the suspicion list collection of every American's phone records?
  When you had the chance to stand up for Americans' privacy, did you?
  Please support the Amash amendment and oppose the NSA's blanket 
surveillance of our constituents.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Chairwoman, I yield 2 minutes for the 
closing argument to the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Cotton).
  Mr. COTTON. Madam Chairwoman, I rise to strongly urge opposition to 
the Amash amendment.
  This program has stopped dozens of terrorist attacks. That means it's 
saved untold American lives.
  This amendment is not simple. It does not limit the program. It does 
not modify it. It does not constrain the program. It ends the program. 
It blows it up. Some of you've heard the analogy that if you want to 
search for a needle in a haystack, you have to have the haystack. This 
takes a leaf blower and blows away the entire haystack. You will not 
have this program if this amendment passes. And it does so, despite all 
of the safeguards you have already heard.
  This program is constitutional under Supreme Court precedent--not 
recent precedent. Precedent goes back to 1979, just 2 years after I was 
born, the year that one of the young sponsors of this amendment was 
born. This program is approved by large bipartisan majorities of this 
body on the statute--text that they approved, not their secret intents 
or wishes.
  It is overseen by article III judges who have been confirmed by the 
Senate and are independent of the executive branch. It is reviewed by 
the Intelligence Committees, and it is executed primarily by military 
officers, not generals, but the majors and the colonels who have been 
fighting and bleeding for this country for 12 years.
  What is it, metadata? It sounds kind of scary. It's nothing more than 
an Excel spreadsheet with five columns: called to, called from, date, 
time, and the duration. Five columns, billions of rows. It's in a 
lockbox. It can't be searched unless you have specific suspicion of a 
number being used by a terrorist. Only then do they go into that 
database and do they run a search for what that number has been 
calling.
  Why do you need it? Verizon, AT, other companies will not keep this 
data for the years necessary. Secondly, you need it quickly. When I was 
in Iraq as a platoon leader with the 101st Airborne, if we rolled up a 
bad guy and we found a cell phone or we found a thumb drive, we would 
immediately upload that data so intelligence professionals could search 
it so they could go roll up another bad guy, because you only have a 
few hours to stop a terrorist once you catch another terrorist.
  Folks, we are at war. You may not like that truth. I wish it weren't 
the truth. But it is the truth. We're at war. Do not take this tool 
away from our warriors on the frontline.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Amash).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. AMASH. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
will be postponed.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in House Report 113-170 on 
which further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 24 by Mr. Terry of Nebraska.
  Amendment No. 99 by Mr. Pompeo of Kansas.
  Amendment No. 100 by Mr. Amash of Michigan.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.


                 Amendment No. 24 Offered by Mr. Terry

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Nebraska 
(Mr. Terry) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.
  Mr. TERRY. Madam Chair, I withdraw my request for a recorded vote on 
amendment No. 24.
  The Acting CHAIR. The request for a recorded vote on amendment No. 24 
is withdrawn, and the amendment stands adopted in accordance with the 
previous voice vote thereon.


                 Amendment No. 99 Offered by Mr. Pompeo

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Kansas 
(Mr. Pompeo) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 409, 
noes 12, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 411]

                               AYES--409

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bass
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)

[[Page H5028]]


     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                                NOES--12

     Becerra
     Capuano
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Grijalva
     Holt
     Honda
     Lofgren
     Polis
     Rangel

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Barletta
     Beatty
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Negrete McLeod
     Pallone
     Rokita
     Schock

                              {time}  1847

  Messrs. COLLINS of New York, GALLEGO, HASTINGS of Florida, Mrs. 
BACHMANN, Ms. SHEA-PORTER, Mr. DOYLE, Ms. LEE of California, Ms. KELLY 
of Illinois, Ms. DeGETTE, Messrs. McGOVERN, McDERMOTT, GRIMM, LEWIS, 
PEARCE, PAYNE, ANDREWS, and CARSON of Indiana changed their vote from 
``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 100 Offered by Mr. Amash

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
(Mr. Amash) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 205, 
noes 217, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 412]

                               AYES--205

     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barton
     Bass
     Becerra
     Bentivolio
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Hahn
     Hall
     Harris
     Hastings (FL)
     Holt
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kingston
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Marchant
     Massie
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Walz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Welch
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--217

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bucshon
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carney
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (CA)
     Delaney
     Denham
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Esty
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Rigell
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Schakowsky
     Schneider
     Schwartz
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Titus
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Barletta
     Beatty
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Negrete McLeod
     Pallone
     Rokita
     Schock

                              {time}  1851

  Mr. CICILLINE changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                          Personal Explanation

  Mrs. BEATTY. Mr. Chair, on rollcall Nos. 411--Pompeo amendment #99, 
``yes'' and 412--Amash amendment #100, ``No.''

[[Page H5029]]

                          Personal Explanation

  Mrs. NEGRETE McLEOD. Mr. Chair, on rollcall Nos. 411, ``yes'' and 
412, ``yes.''
  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider a final period of 
general debate.
  The gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young) and the gentleman from Indiana 
(Mr. Visclosky) each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Indiana.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Chair, I would rise to enter into a colloquy 
with my colleague from Washington (Mr. Heck) and I yield to the 
gentleman.
  Mr. HECK of Washington. I thank the gentleman from Indiana.
  Madam Chair, every summer, Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington's 
10th Congressional District hosts nearly 6,000 ROTC cadets from all 
across the Nation. These cadets conduct an assessment exercise we call 
Warrior Forge. The exercise is an invaluable tool in shaping our next 
generation of Army officers.
  For 40 years, this course has honed the skills, provided the 
cohesion, and fostered the knowledge necessary to create the Army's 
next leaders. I have visited this program, and you need not have a 
single doubt about the quality of the next generation of military 
leaders in our Nation.
  Yet, Madam Chair, an effort is afloat to radically change this proven 
system, without the knowledge or input from this Congress. Members of 
this body, including myself, the ranking member of the House Armed 
Services Committee, and the former ranking member of the House 
Appropriations Committee have been requesting from the Army a simple 
brief and cost-benefit analysis of this proposed radical 
transformation. And for over 2 years, those requests have repeatedly 
been delayed and dismissed and denied.
  Now, while my preference would have been to offer a limiting 
amendment to this legislation, I asked the ranking member and the chair 
if, in this instance, we could work together to seek from the Army a 
timely report so that Congress and the relevant committees can do our 
job, which is to ensure proper oversight.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I appreciate the gentleman raising the issue. I am 
aware of it, and would gladly work with him to get the answers on this 
proposal.
  Mr. HECK of Washington. I thank the ranking member very much.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Chair, I simply want to take this time to thank 
someone I have a profound respect for, as we all do, my chairman, our 
chairman, Bill Young from Florida, for the masterful job he has done 
leading us to this point. And I would ask that he be given a round of 
applause.
  I want to thank the members of the subcommittee and the staff. And I 
would also want to thank four young people who've worked in our offices 
this summer for all of their efforts on our behalf: Craig, Morgan, 
Deepa, and Matt.
  Finally, I want to thank all of my colleagues. We did work our way 
through 100 amendments. From my perspective, this is exactly how this 
institution should work, to have issues and disagreement, to have 
discussions, to have votes, and to have a conclusion to the process, 
and to report a bill.
  So, again, I thank my colleagues, and I thank the chair and the 
colleagues I work with every day on the Defense Subcommittee.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Chair, I'd like to use my time to say 
thank you to the House and all of the Members who participated in some 
vigorous debate, for having conducted the affairs of the House in a 
most professional way, proving to our constituents that we can work 
things out, that we can work together.

                              {time}  1900

  I just want to say thank you to Mr. Visclosky, who is handling the 
minority leadership on this bill for the first time. I think he 
deserves a lot of credit and a lot of applause for the good job that he 
did in keeping this schedule on track.
  Peter, thank you very much.
  While it seems a long time ago, it was only Monday night that we 
finally received the 100 amendments that would be filed and considered 
during the debate. We had to analyze those amendments by Tuesday--
yesterday--so that we could begin the debate on this bill. Our staff 
did an outstanding job in working late into the night Monday night 
analyzing these amendments so that we could consider where we would be 
on those amendments.
  I would like to read the names of the members of our staff, headed by 
Tom McLemore as staff director and Paul Juola in a similar position for 
Mr. Visclosky. Also, Becky Leggierri, Brook Boyer, Ann Reese, Megan 
Rosenbush, Tim Prince, Walter Hearne, B.G. Wright, Paul Terry, Maureen 
Holohan, Jennifer Miller, Adrienne Ramsay, and Sherry Young. They are a 
professional staff. It's hard to find any more of a professional staff 
than those that I just mentioned.
  Madam Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. All time has expired.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       This Act may be cited as the ``Department of Defense 
     Appropriations Act, 2014''.

  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Chairman, I move that the Committee do 
now rise and report the bill back to the House with sundry amendments, 
with the recommendation that the amendments be agreed to and that the 
bill, as amended, do pass.
  The motion was agreed to.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. Poe 
of Texas) having assumed the chair, Ms. Ros-Lehtinen, Acting Chair of 
the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported 
that that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 
2397) making appropriations for the Department of Defense for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2014, and for other purposes, directed 
her to report the bill back to the House with sundry amendments adopted 
in the Committee of the Whole, with the recommendation that the 
amendments be agreed to and that the bill, as amended, do pass.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under House Resolution 312, the previous 
question is ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment reported from the 
Committee of the Whole? If not, the Chair will put them en gros.
  The amendments were agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. FRANKEL of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at 
the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Ms. FRANKEL of Florida. I am opposed in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Ms. Frankel of Florida moves to recommit the bill H.R. 2397 
     to the Committee on Appropriations with instructions to 
     report the same back to the House forthwith, with the 
     following amendment:
       Page 86, line 21, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $25,000,000)''.
       Page 86, line 22, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $20,000,000)''.
       Page 87, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $5,000,000)''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. FRANKEL of Florida. Mr. Speaker, this is the final amendment to 
the bill, which will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. If 
adopted, the bill will re-appropriate resources in areas critical to 
our national security and to defend Israel, our most important ally in 
the Middle East.
  The motion to recommit adds $20 million in funding for Israel's Iron 
Dome defense program and $5 million for the Arrow defense program in 
order to bolster protection against short- and long-range missile 
attacks.
  Now here's something on which we can all agree. Defending Israel is 
in the interest of our national security. The bond between the United 
States and Israel is rooted in our shared national interest and our 
common values of democracy, rule of law, and basic human rights. 
Israel's security is our security. The same forces threatening Israel 
jeopardize the United States. And this is not a partisan issue.

[[Page H5030]]

  All of us who have been to Israel are struck by how close Israelis 
live to neighbors who want to destroy them. As a former mayor of a 
city, I ran a city where we had real problems like gangs and crimes; 
but never did I have to worry about the towns next door shooting 
rockets at my residents. I can't imagine what it would be like to be 
the mayor of Sderot.
  In 2008, before we had Iron Dome, a surge in Hamas rocket attacks 
forced Israel to launch a ground operation that, tragically, claimed 
over a thousand Israeli and Palestinian lives.
  Fast forward to last November. In just 1 week, over 1,500 rockets 
were fired at Israel again by terrorist groups in Gaza. Thankfully, 
this time, Iron Dome intercepted over 80 percent of the deadly attacks, 
preventing war and saving lives.
  I know that we can all agree that support for Israel's missile 
defense program is not merely a favor we do for Israel. Our political 
and military leaders have long praised the strategic significance of 
Israel's powerful military advancing our interests in the region, 
saving our Nation billions of dollars on military personnel and 
equipment that we might otherwise be forced to deploy.
  Looking at Israel's neighborhood, never has this situation been so 
urgent for both our countries, with increased threats from Iran, Hamas, 
Hezbollah, and al Qaeda, and instability in Syria, Egypt, and Jordan. 
We must do all we can to strengthen Israel's defenses, and that is why 
this amendment to increase funding for these defense systems is so 
timely and so necessary.
  Support for Israel has always enjoyed overwhelming bipartisan 
support. So I urge my Democratic and Republican colleagues to come 
together on this important amendment to support Israel and promote 
stability in the Middle East.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Madam Speaker, I rise in opposition to the 
motion.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. Ros-Lehtinen). The gentleman is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. There's no doubt that Iron Dome is an extremely 
effective missile defense system. And because of that, the committee 
fully funded this bill at $220 million for Iron Dome, which is fully in 
line with the President's request and the recently passed defense 
authorization bill.
  Additionally, this is the third year of consecutive funding for a 4-
year commitment. The truth of the matter is they really can't spend it 
any faster or any more effectively.
  So as is so often the case, this motion is purely a political 
statement, and I urge its rejection.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. FRANKEL of Florida. Madam Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 
XX, this 5-minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by 5-
minute votes on passage of the bill; and approval of the Journal, if 
ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 192, 
noes 231, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 413]

                               AYES--192

     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     Owens
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--231

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Pallone
     Rokita

                              {time}  1915

  Messrs. STEWART and RICE of South Carolina changed their vote from 
``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  Under clause 10 of rule XX, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  This is a 5-minute vote.

[[Page H5031]]

  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 315, 
nays 109, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 414]

                               YEAS--315

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Beatty
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardenas
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Rodney
     Delaney
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Holding
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Kelly (PA)
     Kilmer
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NAYS--109

     Amash
     Bass
     Becerra
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings (FL)
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Jones
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kind
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Massie
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Serrano
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Velazquez
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Barletta
     Bustos
     Campbell
     Coble
     Herrera Beutler
     Horsford
     McCarthy (NY)
     Pallone
     Rokita

                              {time}  1930

  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________